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All (9)

All (9) ((9 results))

  • Classification: 12-003-X
    Description:

    The North American Product Classification System (NAPCS) is the departmental standard for the classification of products (goods and services). The classification is a joint project of the national statistical agencies of Canada, Mexico and the United States. However, Statistics Canada has created new classification items for cannabis products in NAPCS Canada V2.0 that are unique to Canada. NAPCS is used to produce product statistics on a variety of topics, including the value of outputs of industries, the consumption by businesses and households, the value of imports and exports, and the movement of industrial and raw material prices.

    NAPCS Canada 2017 Version 2.0 comprises definitions for its 5,033 categories. At the lowest level of the classification, definitions include a descriptive text, as well as illustrative examples, inclusions and exclusions where appropriate.

    Release date: 2018-10-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2013022
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article reports on the composition of capital expenditures in Canada. It highlights major changes in the distribution of aggregate capital spending over the last decade, as investments in structural assets accelerated in resource-based regions. The article also discusses the new preliminary actual estimates for 2012 and the investment intentions for 2013. It is one of a series of Economic Insights articles designed to facilitate ongoing assessments of the Canadian economy.

    Release date: 2013-02-27

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2010003
    Description:

    Design activities are central to firm competitiveness and delivering value-added products. Research has shown that rapidly growing companies attach greater weight to design activities. Through design, firms may improve the user interface and create characteristics that allow them to distinguish their products from those of their competitors. Using the results of the Survey of Advanced Technology 2007, this paper examines the extent of use of design activities among Canadian firms, with a view to explaining factors fostering firms' engagement in design activities. It explores whether design activities are more likely to be carried out in some manufacturing industries than in others. The average size of firms undertaking design activities will also be explored. Characteristics of firms that are likely to spend a greater proportion of their expenditures on in-house design activities versus those who outsource larger percentage of their design work to other firms outside their organizational boundaries will be discussed. This paper will also explore whether firms that have high design intensity are more likely to be innovators. Another area of interest of this paper is the question of whether firms that undertake design activities are more likely to be exporters. Common success factors reported by those firms with high design intensity will also be discussed.

    Release date: 2010-05-25

  • Stats in brief: 13-605-X200900111028
    Description:

    Revised estimates of the Income and Expenditure Accounts (IEA) covering the period 2005 to 2008 have been released along with those for the first quarter of 2009. These revised estimates incorporate the most current source data and seasonal patterns.

    Release date: 2009-11-19

  • Table: 16-001-M2008005
    Description:

    This paper describes a revision of the 2002 greenhouse gas emission reduction expenditure estimates made by Canadian business. These estimates were derived from the 2002 Survey of Environmental Protection Expenditures. Included for comparison purposes are 2004 estimates of greenhouse gas reduction expenditures. Additional tables include statistics on the technologies used by industry as well as the obstacles and drivers encountered by industry to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

    Release date: 2008-06-25

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X20060089562
    Description:

    This service bulletin presents the nature of research and development distribution of current intramural research and development expenditures by Canadian firms for the years 2000 to 2004.

    Release date: 2006-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2006008
    Description:

    Statistics Canada publishes information on industrial research and development (R&D) performers that includes the number of such firms and their total R&D expenditures. What has not been done to date is to look at R&D performers over time. This paper looks at R&D performance between 1994 and 2002 in three ways; first it looks at all firms that performed R&D at any point; the second section looks at R&D performing firms by R&D expenditure group for each year; and, the third section of the study follows firms that began to perform R&D and documents their R&D performance through time.

    Release date: 2006-08-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2004217
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper investigates the link between financial structure and employment growth, and the link between financial structure and inventory growth, among incorporated Canadian manufacturers from 1988 to 1997. It finds that financially vulnerable firms - smaller firms and those with higher leverage - shed nearly 10% more labour than financially healthier firms for a given drop in product demand. The influence was larger during the recession of 1990 to 1992 indicating that higher financial vulnerability, reflected in high leverage, may have worsened during that period. The influence was also greater in sectors that experienced larger cyclical fluctuations. On average, firms with high leverage also tend to cut inventories 5% more when a shock in demand occurs.

    Release date: 2004-02-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20030046509
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article studies recent divergence between Canadian and U.S. household, government, business and external spending and saving. It also looks at the implications for lending and borrowing in the two countries.

    Release date: 2003-04-17
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Table: 16-001-M2008005
    Description:

    This paper describes a revision of the 2002 greenhouse gas emission reduction expenditure estimates made by Canadian business. These estimates were derived from the 2002 Survey of Environmental Protection Expenditures. Included for comparison purposes are 2004 estimates of greenhouse gas reduction expenditures. Additional tables include statistics on the technologies used by industry as well as the obstacles and drivers encountered by industry to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

    Release date: 2008-06-25
Analysis (7)

Analysis (7) ((7 results))

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2013022
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article reports on the composition of capital expenditures in Canada. It highlights major changes in the distribution of aggregate capital spending over the last decade, as investments in structural assets accelerated in resource-based regions. The article also discusses the new preliminary actual estimates for 2012 and the investment intentions for 2013. It is one of a series of Economic Insights articles designed to facilitate ongoing assessments of the Canadian economy.

    Release date: 2013-02-27

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2010003
    Description:

    Design activities are central to firm competitiveness and delivering value-added products. Research has shown that rapidly growing companies attach greater weight to design activities. Through design, firms may improve the user interface and create characteristics that allow them to distinguish their products from those of their competitors. Using the results of the Survey of Advanced Technology 2007, this paper examines the extent of use of design activities among Canadian firms, with a view to explaining factors fostering firms' engagement in design activities. It explores whether design activities are more likely to be carried out in some manufacturing industries than in others. The average size of firms undertaking design activities will also be explored. Characteristics of firms that are likely to spend a greater proportion of their expenditures on in-house design activities versus those who outsource larger percentage of their design work to other firms outside their organizational boundaries will be discussed. This paper will also explore whether firms that have high design intensity are more likely to be innovators. Another area of interest of this paper is the question of whether firms that undertake design activities are more likely to be exporters. Common success factors reported by those firms with high design intensity will also be discussed.

    Release date: 2010-05-25

  • Stats in brief: 13-605-X200900111028
    Description:

    Revised estimates of the Income and Expenditure Accounts (IEA) covering the period 2005 to 2008 have been released along with those for the first quarter of 2009. These revised estimates incorporate the most current source data and seasonal patterns.

    Release date: 2009-11-19

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X20060089562
    Description:

    This service bulletin presents the nature of research and development distribution of current intramural research and development expenditures by Canadian firms for the years 2000 to 2004.

    Release date: 2006-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2006008
    Description:

    Statistics Canada publishes information on industrial research and development (R&D) performers that includes the number of such firms and their total R&D expenditures. What has not been done to date is to look at R&D performers over time. This paper looks at R&D performance between 1994 and 2002 in three ways; first it looks at all firms that performed R&D at any point; the second section looks at R&D performing firms by R&D expenditure group for each year; and, the third section of the study follows firms that began to perform R&D and documents their R&D performance through time.

    Release date: 2006-08-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2004217
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper investigates the link between financial structure and employment growth, and the link between financial structure and inventory growth, among incorporated Canadian manufacturers from 1988 to 1997. It finds that financially vulnerable firms - smaller firms and those with higher leverage - shed nearly 10% more labour than financially healthier firms for a given drop in product demand. The influence was larger during the recession of 1990 to 1992 indicating that higher financial vulnerability, reflected in high leverage, may have worsened during that period. The influence was also greater in sectors that experienced larger cyclical fluctuations. On average, firms with high leverage also tend to cut inventories 5% more when a shock in demand occurs.

    Release date: 2004-02-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20030046509
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article studies recent divergence between Canadian and U.S. household, government, business and external spending and saving. It also looks at the implications for lending and borrowing in the two countries.

    Release date: 2003-04-17
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Classification: 12-003-X
    Description:

    The North American Product Classification System (NAPCS) is the departmental standard for the classification of products (goods and services). The classification is a joint project of the national statistical agencies of Canada, Mexico and the United States. However, Statistics Canada has created new classification items for cannabis products in NAPCS Canada V2.0 that are unique to Canada. NAPCS is used to produce product statistics on a variety of topics, including the value of outputs of industries, the consumption by businesses and households, the value of imports and exports, and the movement of industrial and raw material prices.

    NAPCS Canada 2017 Version 2.0 comprises definitions for its 5,033 categories. At the lowest level of the classification, definitions include a descriptive text, as well as illustrative examples, inclusions and exclusions where appropriate.

    Release date: 2018-10-11
Date modified: