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All (22) (0 to 10 of 22 results)

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019009
    Description:

    This infographic presents results from the Survey of Innovation and Business Strategy relating to the connections of Canadian business to global markets. Data refer to activities in 2017.

    Release date: 2019-02-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2013030
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Description:

    This paper describes the patterns of firm entry and exit across provinces in Canada, the relationship of these patterns to differences in industrial structure and the response of firm entry and exit to changes in the economic environment.

    Firm entry and exit play an important role in shaping industrial structure and dynamics. Although entry and exit are ubiquitous, new firms are often associated with new ideas and the provision of innovative goods and services that enhance competition and force incumbents to become more innovative and efficient. Studies have shown the considerable role played by entry and exit in resource reallocation and productivity improvement.

    Release date: 2013-12-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2012028
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the survival characteristics of firms, using microdata from the Longitudinal Employment Analysis Program (LEAP) of Statistics Canada. Entry rates and survival functions for the 2002 cohort are analyzed. The business sector is disaggregated along industry and size dimensions.

    Release date: 2012-11-07

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2012025
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines whether Canadian firms of different sizes (in terms of employment) grow at different rates year-on-year. The data are from Statistics Canada's Longitudinal Employment Analysis Program and cover the 1999-to-2008 period. The methodology is similar to that used by Haltiwanger, Jarmin and Miranda (2010) for the United States: controls are used for firm age, and possible bias from short-term regression to the mean is removed by sizing firms according to their average number of employees in both previous and current years.

    Release date: 2012-07-05

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2012024
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper looks at annual changes in Canadian business sector employment from 2001 to 2009. This period encompasses an expansionary phase (2001 to 2008), followed by a recession (2008/2009). Firm-level data are used to decompose yearly net employment change into gross employment creation and destruction, which makes it possible to measure the size of total annual employment reallocation. These measures of employment turnover are compared across industries and firm size classes.

    Release date: 2012-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2012009
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series decomposes business-sector annual net employment growth into gross employment creation and gross employment destruction at the firm level. It is based on research carried out by Statistics Canada on the topic of business dynamics.

    Release date: 2012-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2012022
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines firm entry and exit patterns in the Canadian business sector by using the Longitudinal Employment Analysis Program database developed by Statistics Canada. Our primary purpose is to present stylized facts and provide descriptive analysis of the entry and exit patterns in the Canadian economy in order to form a solid foundation for future in-depth theoretical and empirical studies of firm dynamics. In particular, this paper focuses on the relative importance of entrants and exiters in terms of both number and employment, the persistence of entry and exit patterns over time, and the correlation between industry entry and exit rates.

    Release date: 2012-01-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2012004
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article discusses firm entry and exit patterns in the Canadian business sector and its constituent industries. The analysis is based on Statistics Canada Longitudinal Employment Analysis program datasets. The article focuses on the relative importance of entrants and exiters, calculated in terms of number of firms and employment, the persistence of entry and exit patterns over time, and the correlation between industry entry and exit rates.

    Release date: 2012-01-25

  • Notices and consultations: 11-015-X
    Description:

    This newsletter is a brief description of projects within the Business and Labour Market Analysis Division of Statistics Canada. The research covers a wide range of topics including labour market issues, low income, immigration, business firm dynamics, pensions, productivity, technology and innovation, as well as economic geography.

    Release date: 2007-09-14

  • Table: 61-534-X
    Description:

    This publication describes the evolution of the Canadian business environment in light of economic changes in Canada from 1991 to 2001. The publication shows business and employment dynamics in Canada during this period. It provides (1) statistics that show the direct impact of these changes on business creation (firm births) and business destruction (firm deaths); (2) the relative share and distribution of businesses and employment across various categories of firms (Size - small, medium and large size firms, Industry - low-knowledge, medium-knowledge and high-knowledge industries, as well as goods and services industries and by Geography-Province); and (3) it examines survival rates of newly created businesses (lifespan of new businesses).

    Release date: 2006-03-10
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Table: 61-534-X
    Description:

    This publication describes the evolution of the Canadian business environment in light of economic changes in Canada from 1991 to 2001. The publication shows business and employment dynamics in Canada during this period. It provides (1) statistics that show the direct impact of these changes on business creation (firm births) and business destruction (firm deaths); (2) the relative share and distribution of businesses and employment across various categories of firms (Size - small, medium and large size firms, Industry - low-knowledge, medium-knowledge and high-knowledge industries, as well as goods and services industries and by Geography-Province); and (3) it examines survival rates of newly created businesses (lifespan of new businesses).

    Release date: 2006-03-10
Analysis (20)

Analysis (20) (10 to 20 of 20 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2004205
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper considers the implications of changing trade barriers on the survival of Canadian manufacturing firms. A segmented market Cournot model was developed to describe the effects of trade liberalization for heterogeneous firms operating in diverse industries. The predictions of this model are tested empirically using firm-level data for both public and private corporations and tariff rates for both Canada and the United States. Our findings suggest that Canadian tariff reductions decreased the probability of the survival of Canadian firms while declines in American tariffs increased the probability. Combining these two effects, firms in two-thirds of Canadian manufacturing industries saw their probability of survival increase as a result of the tariff reductions mandated by the Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement. However, the sensitivity of individual firms to tariff changes was mitigated by the characteristics of those firms. In particular, productivity and leverage played substantial roles in determining a firm's vulnerability to failure as a result of trade liberalization.

    Release date: 2004-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030016468
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    New small firms with more long-term debt in their balance sheets tend to devote a smaller percentage of their investment expenditure to research and development. A recent Statistics Canada study on financing innovation in new small firms provides insight into an important segment of the small-firm population, namely successful entrants.

    Release date: 2003-02-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002189
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Understanding the importance of the dynamic entry process in the Canadian economy involves measuring size of entry. The main purpose of this paper is to summarize the information we have on the amount of entry in Canada.

    The paper also fulfils another purpose. Some studies have focused on cross-country comparisons (Geroski and Schwalbach 1991; OECD 2001). Interpretation of the results of these studies is difficult unless methodological issues regarding how entry is measured are addressed. Without an understanding of the extent to which different databases produce different results, international comparisons are difficult to evaluate. Cross-country comparisons that are derived from extremely different data sources may be misleading because of the lack of comparability.

    Since there is more than one reliable database that can be used to estimate entry in Canada, this paper asks how measured entry rates vary across different Canadian databases. By examining the difference in entry rates produced by these databases, we provide an estimate of the range or confidence interval that should be used in evaluating whether there are real differences in measured entry rates across countries. We also offer guidance as to the questions that should be asked about the databases used by researchers who conduct international studies. Finally, we make suggestions as to areas of comparison on which international studies should focus.

    Release date: 2002-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2001004
    Description:

    The Survey of Innovation, Advanced Technologies and Practices in the Construction and Related Industries was conducted by Statistics Canada during the spring and summer of 1999. This working paper presents descriptive statistics on business environment, success factors, use and planned use of advanced technologies, use and planned use of advanced practices, source of information, obstacles and impact.

    Release date: 2001-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2001003
    Description:

    The Survey of Innovation, Advanced Technologies and Practices in the Construction and Related Industries was conducted by Statistics Canada during the spring and summer of 1999. It was based on a list of businesses classified to construction industries taken from the Statistics Canada's Business Register. The survey consists of eight sections with questions on business environment; success factors; use and planned use of advanced technologies; use and planned use of advanced practices; mergers, acquisitions and expansions; sources of information; obstacles; and impact.

    Release date: 2001-02-26

  • Articles and reports: 88F0017M2001010
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report defines innovation and explores the current understanding of innovation processes in construction industries. It uses data from the 1999 Survey on Innovation, Advanced Technologies and Practices in the Construction and Related Industries.

    Release date: 2001-02-19

  • Journals and periodicals: 61-526-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study investigates the determinants of failure for new Canadian firms. It explores the role that certain factors play in conditioning the likelihood of survival - factors related to industry structure, firm demographics and macroeconomic cycles. It asks whether the determinants of failure are different for new start-ups than for firms that have reached adolescence, and if the magnitude of these differences is economically significant. It examines whether, after controlling for certain influences, failure rates differ across industries and provinces.

    Two themes figure prominently in this analysis. The first is the impact that certain industry characteristics - such as average firm size and concentration - have on the entry/exit process, either through their influence on failure costs or on the intensity of competition. The second centres on how the dimensions of failure evolve over time as new firms gain market experience.

    Release date: 2000-02-16

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X19990025336
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In a recent Statistics Canada survey, 77% of Canadian plant managers felt their production technology was as good as their domestic competitors. Against their U.S. counterparts, they were less confident: only 57% of Canadian firms believed their technologies were as good as their American competitors. The survey also reveals that 70% firms used the Internet and 60% had a "home page" on the World Wide Web.

    Release date: 2000-01-17

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X1997012
    Description:

    Statistics Canada is engaged in a project "Information System for Science and Technology" which purpose is to develop useful indicators of activity and a framework to tie them together into a coherent picture of science and technology (S&T) in Canada. The Working papers series is used to publish results of the different initiatives conducted within this project. The produced data are related to the activities, linkages and outcomes of S&T. Several key areas are covered such as: innovation, technology diffusion, human resources in S&T and interrelations between different actors involved in S&T. This series also presents important data tabulations taken from regular surveys on R&D and S&T and made possible because of the existing Project.

    Release date: 1998-09-25

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1995067
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The role of technical innovation in economic growth is both a current matter of keen public policy interest, and active exploration in economic theory. However, formal economic theorizing is often constrained by considerations of mathematical tractability. Evolutionary economic theories which are realized as computerized microsimulation models offer significant promise both for transcending mathematical constraints and addressing fundamental questions in a more realistic and flexible manner. This paper sketches XEcon, a microsimulation model of economic growth in the evolutionary tradition.

    Release date: 1995-06-30
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Notices and consultations: 11-015-X
    Description:

    This newsletter is a brief description of projects within the Business and Labour Market Analysis Division of Statistics Canada. The research covers a wide range of topics including labour market issues, low income, immigration, business firm dynamics, pensions, productivity, technology and innovation, as well as economic geography.

    Release date: 2007-09-14
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