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All (14)

All (14) (0 to 10 of 14 results)

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202301000005
    Description: The COVID-19 pandemic had a substantial impact on business dynamics, leading to the temporary or permanent closure of many businesses. Using a newly developed linked database, this paper presents trends in exits, insolvency proposals and bankruptcies across business and financial characteristics among corporations from 2004 to 2020.
    Release date: 2023-10-25

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2022001
    Description:

    This study uses data from the Statistics Canada Longitudinal Worker File linked to Canadian census records to examine the impact of firm closures and involuntary job loss on entry into gig work. The analysis distinguishes between the actions of those who experienced an actual layoff associated with a firm closure and those who worked in a closing firm but did not necessarily wait until the closure (“impending layoff”).

    Release date: 2022-09-27

  • Stats in brief: 11-633-X2022001
    Description:

    In 2020, Statistics Canada began publishing monthly releases of data on business openings and closures. This study provides a better understanding of business dynamics and provides decision makers with evidence to support economic policy development.

    Release date: 2022-01-25

  • Articles and reports: 62F0014M2020016
    Description:

    A summary of methodological treatments as applied to the August 2020 CPI in response to the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on price collection, price availability, and business closures.

    Release date: 2020-09-16

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2016004
    Description:

    Understanding the importance of the dynamic entry process in the Canadian economy involves measuring the amount and size of firm entry. The paper presents estimates of the importance of firm entry in Canada. It uses the database underlying the Longitudinal Employment Analysis Program (LEAP), which has produced measures of firm entry and exit since 1988. This paper discusses the methodology used to estimate entry and exit, the issues that had to be resolved and the reasons for choosing the particular solutions that were adopted. It then presents measures that are derived from LEAP. Finally, it analyzes the sensitivity of the estimates associated with LEAP to alternative methods of estimating entry and exit.

    Release date: 2016-11-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2015045
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article presents quarterly estimates of employer business entry and exit, and the associated job creation and destruction from the first quarter of 2001 to the third quarter of 2014. These quarterly estimates supplement the annual data provided by Statistics Canada’s Longitudinal Employment Analysis Program (LEAP) by providing more timely, infra-annual data on business and employment dynamics.

    Release date: 2015-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2014038
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series describes the results of a data linkage project that created experimental long-term estimates of firm entry and exit rates for the Canadian business sector. It is part of a series of papers that examines firm dynamics using micro-economic data.

    Release date: 2014-08-25

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2007291
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using Statistics Canada's Longitudinal Worker File, we document short-term and long-term earnings losses for a large (10%) sample of Canadian workers who lost their job through firm closures or mass layoffs during the late 1980s and the 1990s. Our use of a nationally representative sample allows us to examine how earnings losses vary across age groups, gender, industries and firms of different sizes. Furthermore, we conduct separate analyses for workers displaced only through firm closures and for a broader sample displaced either through firm closures or mass layoffs. Our main finding is that while the long-term earnings losses experienced on average by workers who are displaced through firm closures or mass layoffs are important, those experienced by displaced workers with considerable seniority appear to be even more substantial. Consistent with findings from the United States by Jacobson, Lalonde and Sullivan (1993), high-seniority displaced men experience long-term earnings losses that represent between 18% and 35% of their pre-displacement earnings. For their female counterparts, the corresponding estimates vary between 24% and 35%.

    Release date: 2007-01-16

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2005010
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper tracks the growth and decline of information and communications technology (ICT) industries that were synonymous with the so-called new economy boom of the late-1990s and its subsequent bust period in the early 2000s. The analysis focuses on the question of whether the ICT bust has been accompanied by a structural shift illustrated by less firm turnover. It shows that to date there is little evidence of a structural shift. Entry rates of new establishments within the ICT sector were above those of other sectors within the economy during both the ICT boom and bust. This is evidence that both firms and entrepreneurs continued to see opportunities to develop new products and markets even during a time of retrenchment. The location of the ICT sector also show little evidence of a change.

    Release date: 2005-03-02

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2000123
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Recent studies have demonstrated the quantitative importance of entry, exit, growth and decline in the industrial population. It is this turnover that rewards innovative activity and contributes to productivity growth.

    While the size of the entry population is impressive - especially when cumulated over time - the importance of entry is ultimately due to its impact on innovation in the economy. Experimentation is important in a dynamic, market-based economy. A key part of the experimentation comes from entrants. New entrepreneurs constantly offer consumers new products both in terms of the basic good and the level of service that accompanies it.

    This experimentation is associated with significant costs since many entrants fail. Young firms are most at risk of failure; data drawn from a longitudinal file of Canadian entrants in both the goods and service sectors show that over half the new firms that fail do so in the first two years of life. Life is short for the majority of entrants. Only 1 in 5 new firms survive to their tenth birthday.

    Since so many entrants fall by the wayside, it is of inherent interest to understand the conditions that are associated with success, the conditions that allow the potential in new entrepreneurs to come to fruition. The success of an entrant is due to its choosing the correct combination of strategies and activities. To understand how these capabilities contribute to growth, it is necessary to study how the performance of entrants relates to differences in strategies and pursued activities.

    This paper describes the environment and the characteristics of entrants that manage to survive and grow. In doing so, it focuses on two issues. The first is the innovativeness of entrants and the extent to which their growth depends on their innovativeness. The second is to outline how the stress on worker skills, which is partially related to training, complements innovation and contributes to growth.

    Release date: 2000-12-08
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Analysis (14)

Analysis (14) (0 to 10 of 14 results)

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202301000005
    Description: The COVID-19 pandemic had a substantial impact on business dynamics, leading to the temporary or permanent closure of many businesses. Using a newly developed linked database, this paper presents trends in exits, insolvency proposals and bankruptcies across business and financial characteristics among corporations from 2004 to 2020.
    Release date: 2023-10-25

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2022001
    Description:

    This study uses data from the Statistics Canada Longitudinal Worker File linked to Canadian census records to examine the impact of firm closures and involuntary job loss on entry into gig work. The analysis distinguishes between the actions of those who experienced an actual layoff associated with a firm closure and those who worked in a closing firm but did not necessarily wait until the closure (“impending layoff”).

    Release date: 2022-09-27

  • Stats in brief: 11-633-X2022001
    Description:

    In 2020, Statistics Canada began publishing monthly releases of data on business openings and closures. This study provides a better understanding of business dynamics and provides decision makers with evidence to support economic policy development.

    Release date: 2022-01-25

  • Articles and reports: 62F0014M2020016
    Description:

    A summary of methodological treatments as applied to the August 2020 CPI in response to the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on price collection, price availability, and business closures.

    Release date: 2020-09-16

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2016004
    Description:

    Understanding the importance of the dynamic entry process in the Canadian economy involves measuring the amount and size of firm entry. The paper presents estimates of the importance of firm entry in Canada. It uses the database underlying the Longitudinal Employment Analysis Program (LEAP), which has produced measures of firm entry and exit since 1988. This paper discusses the methodology used to estimate entry and exit, the issues that had to be resolved and the reasons for choosing the particular solutions that were adopted. It then presents measures that are derived from LEAP. Finally, it analyzes the sensitivity of the estimates associated with LEAP to alternative methods of estimating entry and exit.

    Release date: 2016-11-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2015045
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article presents quarterly estimates of employer business entry and exit, and the associated job creation and destruction from the first quarter of 2001 to the third quarter of 2014. These quarterly estimates supplement the annual data provided by Statistics Canada’s Longitudinal Employment Analysis Program (LEAP) by providing more timely, infra-annual data on business and employment dynamics.

    Release date: 2015-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2014038
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series describes the results of a data linkage project that created experimental long-term estimates of firm entry and exit rates for the Canadian business sector. It is part of a series of papers that examines firm dynamics using micro-economic data.

    Release date: 2014-08-25

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2007291
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using Statistics Canada's Longitudinal Worker File, we document short-term and long-term earnings losses for a large (10%) sample of Canadian workers who lost their job through firm closures or mass layoffs during the late 1980s and the 1990s. Our use of a nationally representative sample allows us to examine how earnings losses vary across age groups, gender, industries and firms of different sizes. Furthermore, we conduct separate analyses for workers displaced only through firm closures and for a broader sample displaced either through firm closures or mass layoffs. Our main finding is that while the long-term earnings losses experienced on average by workers who are displaced through firm closures or mass layoffs are important, those experienced by displaced workers with considerable seniority appear to be even more substantial. Consistent with findings from the United States by Jacobson, Lalonde and Sullivan (1993), high-seniority displaced men experience long-term earnings losses that represent between 18% and 35% of their pre-displacement earnings. For their female counterparts, the corresponding estimates vary between 24% and 35%.

    Release date: 2007-01-16

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2005010
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper tracks the growth and decline of information and communications technology (ICT) industries that were synonymous with the so-called new economy boom of the late-1990s and its subsequent bust period in the early 2000s. The analysis focuses on the question of whether the ICT bust has been accompanied by a structural shift illustrated by less firm turnover. It shows that to date there is little evidence of a structural shift. Entry rates of new establishments within the ICT sector were above those of other sectors within the economy during both the ICT boom and bust. This is evidence that both firms and entrepreneurs continued to see opportunities to develop new products and markets even during a time of retrenchment. The location of the ICT sector also show little evidence of a change.

    Release date: 2005-03-02

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2000123
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Recent studies have demonstrated the quantitative importance of entry, exit, growth and decline in the industrial population. It is this turnover that rewards innovative activity and contributes to productivity growth.

    While the size of the entry population is impressive - especially when cumulated over time - the importance of entry is ultimately due to its impact on innovation in the economy. Experimentation is important in a dynamic, market-based economy. A key part of the experimentation comes from entrants. New entrepreneurs constantly offer consumers new products both in terms of the basic good and the level of service that accompanies it.

    This experimentation is associated with significant costs since many entrants fail. Young firms are most at risk of failure; data drawn from a longitudinal file of Canadian entrants in both the goods and service sectors show that over half the new firms that fail do so in the first two years of life. Life is short for the majority of entrants. Only 1 in 5 new firms survive to their tenth birthday.

    Since so many entrants fall by the wayside, it is of inherent interest to understand the conditions that are associated with success, the conditions that allow the potential in new entrepreneurs to come to fruition. The success of an entrant is due to its choosing the correct combination of strategies and activities. To understand how these capabilities contribute to growth, it is necessary to study how the performance of entrants relates to differences in strategies and pursued activities.

    This paper describes the environment and the characteristics of entrants that manage to survive and grow. In doing so, it focuses on two issues. The first is the innovativeness of entrants and the extent to which their growth depends on their innovativeness. The second is to outline how the stress on worker skills, which is partially related to training, complements innovation and contributes to growth.

    Release date: 2000-12-08
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