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All (18) (0 to 10 of 18 results)

  • Table: 66-001-P
    Description:

    This bulletin contains advance information, monthly and year-to-date, on visitors entering Canada and on returning Canadian residents. It also includes an estimate of overnight trips by province of entry (visitors) and re-entry (Canadian residents). The bulletin is released seven weeks following the reference period.

    Release date: 2019-05-22

  • Public use microdata: 66M0001X
    Description:

    Records relate to the activities of Canadians travelling outside the country and visitors to Canada: Canadian residents; travellers; non-residents; expenditures; length of stay; type of transportation; purpose of trip; accommodation used; places visited; expenditure by categories.

    International travel data are collected in two flows: Canadian returning from abroad; visitors from the USA and from other countries to Canada.

    Release date: 2017-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201200111619
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines various issues related to seniors' access to transportation and to a vehicle. The first part focuses on determining which seniors have a driver's licence and drive a car, including those with the weakest visual, auditory, motor and cognitive faculties. The second part of the article describes seniors' main forms of transportation other than driving a car. The last part examines the impact of seniors' main form of transportation on their level of social participation.

    Release date: 2012-01-23

  • Journals and periodicals: 87-212-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This publication presents data and analytical text on trips and socio-economic characteristics of Canadians travelling within Canada. Trip information includes purpose, activities, mode of transportation, length of stay, origin and destination, and expenditures. In addition to providing national data, the publication also includes some tables presenting provincial and metropolitan detail.

    Release date: 2006-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 89-613-M2005007
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The report examined the location of jobs in 27 census metropolitan areas, paying particular attention to developments in Quebec, Montreal, Ottawa-Hull, Toronto, Winnipeg, Calgary, Edmonton and Vancouver. It also analysed the modes commuters used to travel to work, emphasising public transit and car (as driver or passenger) commute modes.

    While Canadian metropolitan areas continue to be characterized by a strong concentration of jobs in the downtown core, employment grew faster in the suburbs of Canada's largest metropolitan areas than in the city centres between 1996 and 2001. One characteristic of increasing employment in suburban locations is the shifting of manufacturing activities from the core of the city to the suburbs. Retail trade also shifted away from the central core towards more suburban locations. Relatively few workers employed outside the city centre commuted on public transit, rather, most drove or were a passenger in a car. This tendency to commute by car increased the farther the job was located from the city centre.

    Furthermore commute patterns have become more complex, with growth in suburb-to-suburb commutes outpacing traditional commute paths within the city centre, and between the city centre and suburbs. Commuters travelling from suburb to suburb were also much more likely to drive than take public transit.

    Despite the decentralization of jobs occurring in the metropolitan areas, public transit did not lose its share of commuters between 1996 and 2001. While more car traffic headed to jobs in the suburbs, a larger share of commuters heading for the city centre took public transit. This kept the total share of commuters who took public transit stable between 1996 and 2001.

    The report also found that jobs in the downtown core were higher skilled and higher paid, and that earnings increased faster for jobs in the city centre between 1996 and 2001.

    The report uses the 1996 and 2001 censuses of Canada.

    Release date: 2005-06-01

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 96-328-M2004003
    Description:

    This activity looks at the competition between agriculture and urban development for land around urban centres and the difficulties and advantages of farming close to urban areas. The pressure to build more housing in urban areas is strong, but such development takes some of Canada's best farmland out of production permanently. Should decisions on how this land is used be left solely to the market? Students will debate the issue.

    Release date: 2004-06-09

  • Articles and reports: 96F0030X2001010
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This topic deals with Canadians' journey to work and includes data on workplace location, mode of transportation to work and commuting distance between home and work.

    Data from the 2001 Census show that most Canadians work outside the home and that a higher proportion of them is working outside Canada. The data also show that, although the majority of Canadians use their cars to travel to work, more workers, especially in Central Canada, are using public transportation for their daily commute.

    All analyses on Canadians' journey to work are available at the national and provincial/territorial levels, as well as for selected census metropolitan areas.

    This series includes a number of comprehensive articles that supplement the day-of-release information launched through The Daily. These catalogued articles provide an analytical perspective on the 2001 Census release topics. The number and length of these articles vary for each census release and are based on the 21 census release topics disseminated over 8 major release dates.

    More focused articles were disseminated as major releases in The Dailyin the weeks following the official release of the data. Other more specialized articles were also announced in The Daily. The articles in the 2001 Census Analysis Series are available free of charge via the Internet.

    Release date: 2003-02-11

  • Articles and reports: 87-403-X20010015901
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 1999, travel expenditures in Canada totalled $50.1 billion, of which $20.1 billion or 40% was transportation-related. Canadians and foreigners travel billions of kilometres per year in Canada - by air, train or boat or in road vehicles, including private passenger vehicles as well as urban buses and intercity motor coaches providing scheduled or charter services.

    Release date: 2001-10-12

  • Table: 50-501-X
    Description:

    North American transportation in figures provides a comprehensive set of comparable statistical indicators of the use, performance and impact of transportation in North America. It includes over 90 different data tables, supported by figures, maps and extensive technical documentation describing data categories and definitions relating to each country, that is, Canada, Mexico and the United States. The report covers a wide variety of transportation subjects across the three countries: including transportation and the economy; safety; merchandise trade; freight activity; passenger travel; infrastructure; and transportation energy and environment.

    Release date: 2000-10-12

  • Journals and periodicals: 53F0003X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    For several years, urban transit ridership in Canada has been declining. In the late 1990s, ridership began to stabilize but at a level well below the peaks reached in previous years. Many have postulated reasons for the decline, including the dominance of the automobile, changes in work locations and hours, increasing fares, decreasing subsidies and increasing suburbanization.

    Using data from approximately 85 Canadian urban transit service providers, over a period of 8 years, this paper outlines the empirical results of analysis to measure factors that have affected urban transit ridership. Among the key goals of this project was the development of measures of fare elasticity.

    Demographic, socio-economic and level of service variables were used in the research to explain changes in ridership. A variety of dummy variables was also used to account for structural differences.

    The paper concludes with an examination of major Canadian cities that carry the majority of all commuters in the country.

    Release date: 2000-06-06
Data (4)

Data (4) ((4 results))

  • Table: 66-001-P
    Description:

    This bulletin contains advance information, monthly and year-to-date, on visitors entering Canada and on returning Canadian residents. It also includes an estimate of overnight trips by province of entry (visitors) and re-entry (Canadian residents). The bulletin is released seven weeks following the reference period.

    Release date: 2019-05-22

  • Public use microdata: 66M0001X
    Description:

    Records relate to the activities of Canadians travelling outside the country and visitors to Canada: Canadian residents; travellers; non-residents; expenditures; length of stay; type of transportation; purpose of trip; accommodation used; places visited; expenditure by categories.

    International travel data are collected in two flows: Canadian returning from abroad; visitors from the USA and from other countries to Canada.

    Release date: 2017-12-04

  • Table: 50-501-X
    Description:

    North American transportation in figures provides a comprehensive set of comparable statistical indicators of the use, performance and impact of transportation in North America. It includes over 90 different data tables, supported by figures, maps and extensive technical documentation describing data categories and definitions relating to each country, that is, Canada, Mexico and the United States. The report covers a wide variety of transportation subjects across the three countries: including transportation and the economy; safety; merchandise trade; freight activity; passenger travel; infrastructure; and transportation energy and environment.

    Release date: 2000-10-12

  • Table: 50-002-X19990054723
    Description:

    On an industry wide basis, Canadian bus companies continue to grow and prosper. Gross revenues in 1998 (excluding subsidies) were 8.6 percent higher than in 1995.

    Release date: 1999-11-04
Analysis (13)

Analysis (13) (0 to 10 of 13 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201200111619
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines various issues related to seniors' access to transportation and to a vehicle. The first part focuses on determining which seniors have a driver's licence and drive a car, including those with the weakest visual, auditory, motor and cognitive faculties. The second part of the article describes seniors' main forms of transportation other than driving a car. The last part examines the impact of seniors' main form of transportation on their level of social participation.

    Release date: 2012-01-23

  • Journals and periodicals: 87-212-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This publication presents data and analytical text on trips and socio-economic characteristics of Canadians travelling within Canada. Trip information includes purpose, activities, mode of transportation, length of stay, origin and destination, and expenditures. In addition to providing national data, the publication also includes some tables presenting provincial and metropolitan detail.

    Release date: 2006-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 89-613-M2005007
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The report examined the location of jobs in 27 census metropolitan areas, paying particular attention to developments in Quebec, Montreal, Ottawa-Hull, Toronto, Winnipeg, Calgary, Edmonton and Vancouver. It also analysed the modes commuters used to travel to work, emphasising public transit and car (as driver or passenger) commute modes.

    While Canadian metropolitan areas continue to be characterized by a strong concentration of jobs in the downtown core, employment grew faster in the suburbs of Canada's largest metropolitan areas than in the city centres between 1996 and 2001. One characteristic of increasing employment in suburban locations is the shifting of manufacturing activities from the core of the city to the suburbs. Retail trade also shifted away from the central core towards more suburban locations. Relatively few workers employed outside the city centre commuted on public transit, rather, most drove or were a passenger in a car. This tendency to commute by car increased the farther the job was located from the city centre.

    Furthermore commute patterns have become more complex, with growth in suburb-to-suburb commutes outpacing traditional commute paths within the city centre, and between the city centre and suburbs. Commuters travelling from suburb to suburb were also much more likely to drive than take public transit.

    Despite the decentralization of jobs occurring in the metropolitan areas, public transit did not lose its share of commuters between 1996 and 2001. While more car traffic headed to jobs in the suburbs, a larger share of commuters heading for the city centre took public transit. This kept the total share of commuters who took public transit stable between 1996 and 2001.

    The report also found that jobs in the downtown core were higher skilled and higher paid, and that earnings increased faster for jobs in the city centre between 1996 and 2001.

    The report uses the 1996 and 2001 censuses of Canada.

    Release date: 2005-06-01

  • Articles and reports: 96F0030X2001010
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This topic deals with Canadians' journey to work and includes data on workplace location, mode of transportation to work and commuting distance between home and work.

    Data from the 2001 Census show that most Canadians work outside the home and that a higher proportion of them is working outside Canada. The data also show that, although the majority of Canadians use their cars to travel to work, more workers, especially in Central Canada, are using public transportation for their daily commute.

    All analyses on Canadians' journey to work are available at the national and provincial/territorial levels, as well as for selected census metropolitan areas.

    This series includes a number of comprehensive articles that supplement the day-of-release information launched through The Daily. These catalogued articles provide an analytical perspective on the 2001 Census release topics. The number and length of these articles vary for each census release and are based on the 21 census release topics disseminated over 8 major release dates.

    More focused articles were disseminated as major releases in The Dailyin the weeks following the official release of the data. Other more specialized articles were also announced in The Daily. The articles in the 2001 Census Analysis Series are available free of charge via the Internet.

    Release date: 2003-02-11

  • Articles and reports: 87-403-X20010015901
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 1999, travel expenditures in Canada totalled $50.1 billion, of which $20.1 billion or 40% was transportation-related. Canadians and foreigners travel billions of kilometres per year in Canada - by air, train or boat or in road vehicles, including private passenger vehicles as well as urban buses and intercity motor coaches providing scheduled or charter services.

    Release date: 2001-10-12

  • Journals and periodicals: 53F0003X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    For several years, urban transit ridership in Canada has been declining. In the late 1990s, ridership began to stabilize but at a level well below the peaks reached in previous years. Many have postulated reasons for the decline, including the dominance of the automobile, changes in work locations and hours, increasing fares, decreasing subsidies and increasing suburbanization.

    Using data from approximately 85 Canadian urban transit service providers, over a period of 8 years, this paper outlines the empirical results of analysis to measure factors that have affected urban transit ridership. Among the key goals of this project was the development of measures of fare elasticity.

    Demographic, socio-economic and level of service variables were used in the research to explain changes in ridership. A variety of dummy variables was also used to account for structural differences.

    The paper concludes with an examination of major Canadian cities that carry the majority of all commuters in the country.

    Release date: 2000-06-06

  • Articles and reports: 87-003-X20000024939
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In this article, we describe, first the changes that have occurred in the family structure. An overview of the demographic changes that have marked the period from 1980 to 1998, will shed some light on the factors that seem to influence the travel market at the start of the millenium. We then paint a picture of travel by Canadian families in 1998 compared to that of adults travelling alone. In this latter section, we present some of the strategies the tourst industry uses to adapt to these new markets.

    Release date: 2000-04-12

  • Articles and reports: 87-403-X19970014744
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Canada's economy was booming in 1997. The economy, as measured by the Gross Domestic Product (GDP), grew 3.8% in 1997, its best performance since 1994 and the second best this decade.

    Release date: 1999-11-24

  • Articles and reports: 87-403-X19970014746
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Vast distances, dependence on trade and low population density (compared to the United States and Europe) make transportation vitally important in Canada. The nation's travel and tourism patterns, both domestically and internationally, are a mirror image of Canadian business, lifestyles and quality of life.

    Release date: 1999-11-24

  • Articles and reports: 87-003-X19990044721
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    As the Internation Year of the Senior Persons winds down, attention on this growing group of consumers will continue well into the next millenium. This event marked the first year that seniors have been recognized by a worldwide designation.

    Release date: 1999-10-29
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 96-328-M2004003
    Description:

    This activity looks at the competition between agriculture and urban development for land around urban centres and the difficulties and advantages of farming close to urban areas. The pressure to build more housing in urban areas is strong, but such development takes some of Canada's best farmland out of production permanently. Should decisions on how this land is used be left solely to the market? Students will debate the issue.

    Release date: 2004-06-09
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