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All (4)

All (4) ((4 results))

  • Articles and reports: 21-601-M2003065
    Description:

    This paper investigates the key characteristics of the farm operators and farm businesses that influence computer use.

    Release date: 2003-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2002008
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    While the number of census-farms and farm operators is shrinking, the number of jobs in the agriculture and agri-food industry is growing. During the 15-year period from 1981 to 1996, the industry employed 15% of Canada's workforce.

    Employment in the agri-food sector has grown faster than the overall Canadian economy and this has offset the decline in employment on farms. In 1981, more people worked on farms than worked in restaurants, bars and taverns. By 1996, this trend had reversed and employment in the food and beverage services sector far outstripped the number of workers on farms.

    Food processing is often promoted as part of agricultural policy (to provide a local market for Canadian farmers) and as part of rural development policy (to create jobs in rural areas). However, in 1996, fewer people were working in Canada's food processing sector than in 1981. More food was processed (there was growth in the gross domestic product (GDP) of this sector), but fewer workers were involved. Rural regions adjacent to urban areas gained a greater share of food processing employment, making these regions relatively competitive in keeping food processing workforces.

    Employment in the agricultural and agri-food sectors is growing, but the nature of the work and where it is being done is changing.

    Release date: 2003-12-11

  • Table: 16-201-X20030006667
    Description:

    Water is a basic necessity of life: access to clean water in sufficient quantity is an integral part of our well-being. It has had a strong influence on Canada's development as a country and remains a precious part of our natural resource wealth.

    While Canadians live in a country with a plentiful supply of fresh water, they are also concerned about a number of water-related issues. These include the availability, distribution, use and quality of water, as well as the controls placed on water usage. This article examines these issues by creating a statistical portrait of Canada's fresh water resources.

    Release date: 2003-12-03

  • Table: 32-229-X
    Description:

    This publication contains supply, disposition and per capita disappearance data for the following food groups: cereals, sugars and syrups, pulses and nuts, beverages, dairy products and by-products, poultry, eggs and meats. Per capita disappearance is available on both a retail weight and fresh equivalent basis per day and per year.

    Release date: 2003-06-27
Data (2)

Data (2) ((2 results))

  • Table: 16-201-X20030006667
    Description:

    Water is a basic necessity of life: access to clean water in sufficient quantity is an integral part of our well-being. It has had a strong influence on Canada's development as a country and remains a precious part of our natural resource wealth.

    While Canadians live in a country with a plentiful supply of fresh water, they are also concerned about a number of water-related issues. These include the availability, distribution, use and quality of water, as well as the controls placed on water usage. This article examines these issues by creating a statistical portrait of Canada's fresh water resources.

    Release date: 2003-12-03

  • Table: 32-229-X
    Description:

    This publication contains supply, disposition and per capita disappearance data for the following food groups: cereals, sugars and syrups, pulses and nuts, beverages, dairy products and by-products, poultry, eggs and meats. Per capita disappearance is available on both a retail weight and fresh equivalent basis per day and per year.

    Release date: 2003-06-27
Analysis (2)

Analysis (2) ((2 results))

  • Articles and reports: 21-601-M2003065
    Description:

    This paper investigates the key characteristics of the farm operators and farm businesses that influence computer use.

    Release date: 2003-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2002008
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    While the number of census-farms and farm operators is shrinking, the number of jobs in the agriculture and agri-food industry is growing. During the 15-year period from 1981 to 1996, the industry employed 15% of Canada's workforce.

    Employment in the agri-food sector has grown faster than the overall Canadian economy and this has offset the decline in employment on farms. In 1981, more people worked on farms than worked in restaurants, bars and taverns. By 1996, this trend had reversed and employment in the food and beverage services sector far outstripped the number of workers on farms.

    Food processing is often promoted as part of agricultural policy (to provide a local market for Canadian farmers) and as part of rural development policy (to create jobs in rural areas). However, in 1996, fewer people were working in Canada's food processing sector than in 1981. More food was processed (there was growth in the gross domestic product (GDP) of this sector), but fewer workers were involved. Rural regions adjacent to urban areas gained a greater share of food processing employment, making these regions relatively competitive in keeping food processing workforces.

    Employment in the agricultural and agri-food sectors is growing, but the nature of the work and where it is being done is changing.

    Release date: 2003-12-11
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