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  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500154931
    Description:

    Using Statistics Canada data from multiple cycles of the General Social Survey, this chapter of Women in Canada examines gender differences in the allocation of time to both primary activities and simultaneous activities (i.e., those done concurrently with other activities), focusing on unpaid work and leisure. It also estimates the total work burden of women and men. In addition to gender, age, family type, and immigrant status may affect time use. For this reason, gender differences in time use among these sub-populations are explored.

    Release date: 2018-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X200900110886
    Description:

    Interviewer variability is a major component of variability of survey statistics. Different strategies related to question formatting, question phrasing, interviewer training, interviewer workload, interviewer experience and interviewer assignment are employed in an effort to reduce interviewer variability. The traditional formula for measuring interviewer variability, commonly referred to as the interviewer effect, is given by ieff := deff_int = 1 + (n bar sub int - 1) rho sub int, where rho sub int and n bar sub int are the intra-interviewer correlation and the simple average of the interviewer workloads, respectively. In this article, we provide a model-assisted justification of this well-known formula for equal probability of selection methods (epsem) with no spatial clustering in the sample and equal interviewer workload. However, spatial clustering and unequal weighting are both very common in large scale surveys. In the context of a complex sampling design, we obtain an appropriate formula for the interviewer variability that takes into consideration unequal probability of selection and spatial clustering. Our formula provides a more accurate assessment of interviewer effects and thus is helpful in allocating more reasonable amount of funds to control the interviewer variability. We also propose a decomposition of the overall effect into effects due to weighting, spatial clustering and interviewers. Such a decomposition is helpful in understanding ways to reduce total variance by different means.

    Release date: 2009-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X200900210835
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines physical and emotional abuse from patients in nurses working in hospitals or long-term care facilities.

    Release date: 2009-04-15

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X200800210565
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines associations between medication error and selected factors in the workplace of hospital-employed registered nurses in Canada. Data are from the 2005 National Survey of the Work and Health of Nurses.

    Release date: 2008-05-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20061129544
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Discussions related to work hours are typically driven by cross-sectional studies. Much less is known about the longitudinal perspective and the persistence of long hours or periods of underemployment. The annual hours of employees are examined over a five-year period to determine what proportion experience variable work years and how their well-being is affected.

    Release date: 2007-03-20

  • Journals and periodicals: 83-003-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The 2005 National Survey of the Work and Health of Nurses (NSWHN) is the first nationally representative survey to focus on the working conditions and health of Canada's nurses. Registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs) and registered psychiatric nurses (RPNs) in all provinces and territories shared their perceptions on a variety of topics, including:- workload- working overtime, whether paid or unpaid- adverse events such as medication errors and patient falls- support and respect from co-workers and supervisors- staffing adequacy- working relations with physicians- their own chronic diseases and injuries- their mental health.

    The 2005 NSWHN was developed in collaboration with organizations representing practicing nurses, health care researchers, health information specialists and federal government departments. The survey was conducted by Statistics Canada in partnership with the Canadian Institute for Health Information and Health Canada. A total of 18,676 nurses were interviewed, representing LPNs, RNs and RPNs in a variety of health care settings and in all provinces and territories. The survey's impressive response rate of 80% reflects the enthusiasm and support of nurses across the country.

    The survey collected information on a rich array of topics reflecting the physical and emotional challenges nurses face in delivering patient care today. Nurses answered many questions about the quality of patient care, working relations with co-workers and managers, the amount of time they work to get their jobs done, and the way they feel about their jobs and careers as nurses. Data from the 2005 NSWHN will provide an invaluable resource for researchers, health care providers, policy makers and anyone with an interest in human resources, particularly in the health care field.

    Release date: 2006-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2006052
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    The 2005 National Survey of the Work and Health of Nurses (NSWHN) represents a collaborative effort involving the Canadian Institute for Health Information, Health Canada, and Statistics Canada.

    The NSWHN was designed to examine links between the work environment and the health of regulated nurses in Canada, and is the first nationally representative survey of its kind. The survey's high response rate (80%) reflects the enthusiasm with which nurses involved themselves in the survey.

    Nearly 19,000 regulated nurses, representing registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs) and registered psychiatric nurses (RPNs) across the country were interviewed on a variety of topics, including the conditions in which they practice, the challenges they face in doing their jobs, and their physical and mental wellbeing.

    They shared their perceptions of work organization, including staffing, shift work, overtime and employee support. Nurses were also asked about work stress, role overload, respect, and quality of patient care. Information about their health status, such as chronic conditions, pain, self-perceived general and mental health, medication use, and the impact of health on the performance of nursing duties, was also collected.

    This document presents key findings from the 2005 NSWHN for each province, as well as for the three territories combined.

    Release date: 2006-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006278
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Numerous studies of working hours have drawn important conclusions from cross-sectional surveys. For example, the share of individuals working long hours is quite large at any given point in time. Moreover, this appears to have increased over the past two decades, raising the call for policies designed to alleviate working hours discrepancies among workers, or reduce working time overall. However, if work hours vary substantially at the individual level over time, then conclusions based upon studies of cross-sectional data may be incomplete. Using longitudinal data from the Canadian Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, we find that there is substantial variation in annual working hours at the individual level. In fact, as much as half of the cross-sectional inequality in annual work hours can be explained by individual-level instability in hours. Moreover, very few individuals work chronically long hours. Instability in work hours is shown to be related to low-job quality, non-standard work, low-income levels, stress and bad health. This indicates that working variable work hours is not likely done by choice; rather, it is more likely that these workers are unable to secure more stable employment. The lack of persistence in long work hours, plus the high level of individual work hours instability undermines the equity based arguments behind working time reduction policies. Furthermore, this research points out that policies designed to reduce hours instability could benefit workers.

    Release date: 2006-03-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006279
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article summarizes findings from the research paper entitled: Work Hours Instability in Canada.

    Numerous studies of working hours have drawn important conclusions from cross-sectional surveys. For example, the share of individuals working long hours is quite large at any given point in time. Moreover, this appears to have increased over the past two decades, raising the call for policies designed to alleviate working hours discrepancies among workers, or reduce working time overall. However, if work hours vary substantially at the individual level over time, then conclusions based upon studies of cross-sectional data may be incomplete. Using longitudinal data from the Canadian Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, we find that there is substantial variation in annual working hours at the individual level. In fact, as much as half of the cross-sectional inequality in annual work hours can be explained by individual-level instability in hours. Moreover, very few individuals work chronically long hours. Instability in work hours is shown to be related to low-job quality, non-standard work, low-income levels, stress and bad health. This indicates that working variable work hours is not likely done by choice; rather, it is more likely that these workers are unable to secure more stable employment. The lack of persistence in long work hours, plus the high level of individual work hours instability undermines the equity based arguments behind working time reduction policies. Furthermore, this research points out that policies designed to reduce hours instability could benefit workers.

    Release date: 2006-03-29

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200411113130
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Nurses make up the largest proportion of health workers in Canada. However, these days they are under increasing pressure. Their average age has increased, enrolment in nursing programs declined during the 1990s, and employment of lower-paid unregulated workers has increased. A look at employment trends between 1987 and 2003 for registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and nurse aides and orderlies.

    Release date: 2004-12-20
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Analysis (14)

Analysis (14) (0 to 10 of 14 results)

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500154931
    Description:

    Using Statistics Canada data from multiple cycles of the General Social Survey, this chapter of Women in Canada examines gender differences in the allocation of time to both primary activities and simultaneous activities (i.e., those done concurrently with other activities), focusing on unpaid work and leisure. It also estimates the total work burden of women and men. In addition to gender, age, family type, and immigrant status may affect time use. For this reason, gender differences in time use among these sub-populations are explored.

    Release date: 2018-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X200900110886
    Description:

    Interviewer variability is a major component of variability of survey statistics. Different strategies related to question formatting, question phrasing, interviewer training, interviewer workload, interviewer experience and interviewer assignment are employed in an effort to reduce interviewer variability. The traditional formula for measuring interviewer variability, commonly referred to as the interviewer effect, is given by ieff := deff_int = 1 + (n bar sub int - 1) rho sub int, where rho sub int and n bar sub int are the intra-interviewer correlation and the simple average of the interviewer workloads, respectively. In this article, we provide a model-assisted justification of this well-known formula for equal probability of selection methods (epsem) with no spatial clustering in the sample and equal interviewer workload. However, spatial clustering and unequal weighting are both very common in large scale surveys. In the context of a complex sampling design, we obtain an appropriate formula for the interviewer variability that takes into consideration unequal probability of selection and spatial clustering. Our formula provides a more accurate assessment of interviewer effects and thus is helpful in allocating more reasonable amount of funds to control the interviewer variability. We also propose a decomposition of the overall effect into effects due to weighting, spatial clustering and interviewers. Such a decomposition is helpful in understanding ways to reduce total variance by different means.

    Release date: 2009-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X200900210835
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines physical and emotional abuse from patients in nurses working in hospitals or long-term care facilities.

    Release date: 2009-04-15

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X200800210565
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines associations between medication error and selected factors in the workplace of hospital-employed registered nurses in Canada. Data are from the 2005 National Survey of the Work and Health of Nurses.

    Release date: 2008-05-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20061129544
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Discussions related to work hours are typically driven by cross-sectional studies. Much less is known about the longitudinal perspective and the persistence of long hours or periods of underemployment. The annual hours of employees are examined over a five-year period to determine what proportion experience variable work years and how their well-being is affected.

    Release date: 2007-03-20

  • Journals and periodicals: 83-003-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The 2005 National Survey of the Work and Health of Nurses (NSWHN) is the first nationally representative survey to focus on the working conditions and health of Canada's nurses. Registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs) and registered psychiatric nurses (RPNs) in all provinces and territories shared their perceptions on a variety of topics, including:- workload- working overtime, whether paid or unpaid- adverse events such as medication errors and patient falls- support and respect from co-workers and supervisors- staffing adequacy- working relations with physicians- their own chronic diseases and injuries- their mental health.

    The 2005 NSWHN was developed in collaboration with organizations representing practicing nurses, health care researchers, health information specialists and federal government departments. The survey was conducted by Statistics Canada in partnership with the Canadian Institute for Health Information and Health Canada. A total of 18,676 nurses were interviewed, representing LPNs, RNs and RPNs in a variety of health care settings and in all provinces and territories. The survey's impressive response rate of 80% reflects the enthusiasm and support of nurses across the country.

    The survey collected information on a rich array of topics reflecting the physical and emotional challenges nurses face in delivering patient care today. Nurses answered many questions about the quality of patient care, working relations with co-workers and managers, the amount of time they work to get their jobs done, and the way they feel about their jobs and careers as nurses. Data from the 2005 NSWHN will provide an invaluable resource for researchers, health care providers, policy makers and anyone with an interest in human resources, particularly in the health care field.

    Release date: 2006-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2006052
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    The 2005 National Survey of the Work and Health of Nurses (NSWHN) represents a collaborative effort involving the Canadian Institute for Health Information, Health Canada, and Statistics Canada.

    The NSWHN was designed to examine links between the work environment and the health of regulated nurses in Canada, and is the first nationally representative survey of its kind. The survey's high response rate (80%) reflects the enthusiasm with which nurses involved themselves in the survey.

    Nearly 19,000 regulated nurses, representing registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs) and registered psychiatric nurses (RPNs) across the country were interviewed on a variety of topics, including the conditions in which they practice, the challenges they face in doing their jobs, and their physical and mental wellbeing.

    They shared their perceptions of work organization, including staffing, shift work, overtime and employee support. Nurses were also asked about work stress, role overload, respect, and quality of patient care. Information about their health status, such as chronic conditions, pain, self-perceived general and mental health, medication use, and the impact of health on the performance of nursing duties, was also collected.

    This document presents key findings from the 2005 NSWHN for each province, as well as for the three territories combined.

    Release date: 2006-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006278
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Numerous studies of working hours have drawn important conclusions from cross-sectional surveys. For example, the share of individuals working long hours is quite large at any given point in time. Moreover, this appears to have increased over the past two decades, raising the call for policies designed to alleviate working hours discrepancies among workers, or reduce working time overall. However, if work hours vary substantially at the individual level over time, then conclusions based upon studies of cross-sectional data may be incomplete. Using longitudinal data from the Canadian Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, we find that there is substantial variation in annual working hours at the individual level. In fact, as much as half of the cross-sectional inequality in annual work hours can be explained by individual-level instability in hours. Moreover, very few individuals work chronically long hours. Instability in work hours is shown to be related to low-job quality, non-standard work, low-income levels, stress and bad health. This indicates that working variable work hours is not likely done by choice; rather, it is more likely that these workers are unable to secure more stable employment. The lack of persistence in long work hours, plus the high level of individual work hours instability undermines the equity based arguments behind working time reduction policies. Furthermore, this research points out that policies designed to reduce hours instability could benefit workers.

    Release date: 2006-03-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006279
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article summarizes findings from the research paper entitled: Work Hours Instability in Canada.

    Numerous studies of working hours have drawn important conclusions from cross-sectional surveys. For example, the share of individuals working long hours is quite large at any given point in time. Moreover, this appears to have increased over the past two decades, raising the call for policies designed to alleviate working hours discrepancies among workers, or reduce working time overall. However, if work hours vary substantially at the individual level over time, then conclusions based upon studies of cross-sectional data may be incomplete. Using longitudinal data from the Canadian Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, we find that there is substantial variation in annual working hours at the individual level. In fact, as much as half of the cross-sectional inequality in annual work hours can be explained by individual-level instability in hours. Moreover, very few individuals work chronically long hours. Instability in work hours is shown to be related to low-job quality, non-standard work, low-income levels, stress and bad health. This indicates that working variable work hours is not likely done by choice; rather, it is more likely that these workers are unable to secure more stable employment. The lack of persistence in long work hours, plus the high level of individual work hours instability undermines the equity based arguments behind working time reduction policies. Furthermore, this research points out that policies designed to reduce hours instability could benefit workers.

    Release date: 2006-03-29

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200411113130
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Nurses make up the largest proportion of health workers in Canada. However, these days they are under increasing pressure. Their average age has increased, enrolment in nursing programs declined during the 1990s, and employment of lower-paid unregulated workers has increased. A look at employment trends between 1987 and 2003 for registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and nurse aides and orderlies.

    Release date: 2004-12-20
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