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All (17) (0 to 10 of 17 results)

  • Articles and reports: 16-508-X2019001
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This fact sheet compares population density for the Toronto and Vancouver census metropolitan areas (CMAs) in 1971 and 2016. It includes maps showing changes in the extent and density of populated areas on the periphery of these areas, as well as changes in population density within previously settled areas.

    Release date: 2019-02-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2018018
    Description:

    This paper describes the data sources and methods used to backcast provincial and territorial income-based gross domestic product (GDP), expenditure-based GDP, real gross domestic income, unemployment rates, depreciation rates and urbanization rates. Nevertheless, estimates can be produced that are very close and which are useful for understanding the evolution of the provincial and territorial economies. Instrumental variable techniques are used to estimate the historical movements of these economic variables back to 1950.

    Release date: 2018-11-02

  • Stats in brief: 98-200-X2016001
    Description:

    This Census in Brief examines municipalities (census subdivisions) in Canada that were the largest in 2016, and those that grew the fastest between 2011 and 2016, as well as insights into ongoing urbanization and urban spread in Canada.

    Release date: 2017-02-08

  • Articles and reports: 16-201-X201600014361
    Geography: Census metropolitan area, Census metropolitan area part
    Description:

    The article "The changing landscape of Canadian metropolitan areas" provides an analysis of land cover and land use change in Canada's largest cities. It focuses on the change in built-up area, arable land and natural and semi-natural land in and around CMAs from 1971 to 2011. The report includes CMA-specific geographical profiles that include tables, charts and maps as well as links to a wealth of other relevant information.

    The June 2016 update includes the addition of spatial data files (ArcGIS®, file extension: .shp) for each CMA that can be downloaded from the HTML version of the publication.

    Release date: 2016-03-22

  • Articles and reports: 21-601-M2008090
    Description:

    The objective of this working paper is to document the structure and trends for the rural population of Canada, using three major definitions of rural Canada: the "census rural" definition, the "rural and small town" definition and the OECD "predominantly rural region" definition. This analysis is entirely based on data from the Census of Population from 1981 to 2006 (Statistics Canada, 2007).

    Release date: 2008-12-02

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2006035
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study looks at the average age of the four main components of public infrastructure in Canada: roads and highways, sewer systems, wastewater treatment facilities, and bridges. This study covers the 1963 to 2003 period for the three levels of government.

    Release date: 2006-01-30

  • Articles and reports: 89-613-M2005007
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The report examined the location of jobs in 27 census metropolitan areas, paying particular attention to developments in Quebec, Montreal, Ottawa-Hull, Toronto, Winnipeg, Calgary, Edmonton and Vancouver. It also analysed the modes commuters used to travel to work, emphasising public transit and car (as driver or passenger) commute modes.

    While Canadian metropolitan areas continue to be characterized by a strong concentration of jobs in the downtown core, employment grew faster in the suburbs of Canada's largest metropolitan areas than in the city centres between 1996 and 2001. One characteristic of increasing employment in suburban locations is the shifting of manufacturing activities from the core of the city to the suburbs. Retail trade also shifted away from the central core towards more suburban locations. Relatively few workers employed outside the city centre commuted on public transit, rather, most drove or were a passenger in a car. This tendency to commute by car increased the farther the job was located from the city centre.

    Furthermore commute patterns have become more complex, with growth in suburb-to-suburb commutes outpacing traditional commute paths within the city centre, and between the city centre and suburbs. Commuters travelling from suburb to suburb were also much more likely to drive than take public transit.

    Despite the decentralization of jobs occurring in the metropolitan areas, public transit did not lose its share of commuters between 1996 and 2001. While more car traffic headed to jobs in the suburbs, a larger share of commuters heading for the city centre took public transit. This kept the total share of commuters who took public transit stable between 1996 and 2001.

    The report also found that jobs in the downtown core were higher skilled and higher paid, and that earnings increased faster for jobs in the city centre between 1996 and 2001.

    The report uses the 1996 and 2001 censuses of Canada.

    Release date: 2005-06-01

  • Articles and reports: 21-601-M2005073
    Description:

    The purpose of this study is to examine the extent to which farming practices have adjusted to the presence of urbanization in Canada.

    The adoption rates for the eight EMSs were obtained from the Farm Environmental Management Survey (FEMS) conducted in 2001 by Statistics Canada and sponsored in part by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC).

    Release date: 2005-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2005001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This bulletin examines the trends in agricultural and non-agricultural land use across Canada from 1951-2001. The analysis updates the earlier reports by Hofmann(2001) and Statistics Canada (2001).

    Release date: 2005-01-31

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 96-328-M2004003
    Description:

    This activity looks at the competition between agriculture and urban development for land around urban centres and the difficulties and advantages of farming close to urban areas. The pressure to build more housing in urban areas is strong, but such development takes some of Canada's best farmland out of production permanently. Should decisions on how this land is used be left solely to the market? Students will debate the issue.

    Release date: 2004-06-09
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Analysis (14)

Analysis (14) (0 to 10 of 14 results)

  • Articles and reports: 16-508-X2019001
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This fact sheet compares population density for the Toronto and Vancouver census metropolitan areas (CMAs) in 1971 and 2016. It includes maps showing changes in the extent and density of populated areas on the periphery of these areas, as well as changes in population density within previously settled areas.

    Release date: 2019-02-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2018018
    Description:

    This paper describes the data sources and methods used to backcast provincial and territorial income-based gross domestic product (GDP), expenditure-based GDP, real gross domestic income, unemployment rates, depreciation rates and urbanization rates. Nevertheless, estimates can be produced that are very close and which are useful for understanding the evolution of the provincial and territorial economies. Instrumental variable techniques are used to estimate the historical movements of these economic variables back to 1950.

    Release date: 2018-11-02

  • Stats in brief: 98-200-X2016001
    Description:

    This Census in Brief examines municipalities (census subdivisions) in Canada that were the largest in 2016, and those that grew the fastest between 2011 and 2016, as well as insights into ongoing urbanization and urban spread in Canada.

    Release date: 2017-02-08

  • Articles and reports: 16-201-X201600014361
    Geography: Census metropolitan area, Census metropolitan area part
    Description:

    The article "The changing landscape of Canadian metropolitan areas" provides an analysis of land cover and land use change in Canada's largest cities. It focuses on the change in built-up area, arable land and natural and semi-natural land in and around CMAs from 1971 to 2011. The report includes CMA-specific geographical profiles that include tables, charts and maps as well as links to a wealth of other relevant information.

    The June 2016 update includes the addition of spatial data files (ArcGIS®, file extension: .shp) for each CMA that can be downloaded from the HTML version of the publication.

    Release date: 2016-03-22

  • Articles and reports: 21-601-M2008090
    Description:

    The objective of this working paper is to document the structure and trends for the rural population of Canada, using three major definitions of rural Canada: the "census rural" definition, the "rural and small town" definition and the OECD "predominantly rural region" definition. This analysis is entirely based on data from the Census of Population from 1981 to 2006 (Statistics Canada, 2007).

    Release date: 2008-12-02

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2006035
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study looks at the average age of the four main components of public infrastructure in Canada: roads and highways, sewer systems, wastewater treatment facilities, and bridges. This study covers the 1963 to 2003 period for the three levels of government.

    Release date: 2006-01-30

  • Articles and reports: 89-613-M2005007
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The report examined the location of jobs in 27 census metropolitan areas, paying particular attention to developments in Quebec, Montreal, Ottawa-Hull, Toronto, Winnipeg, Calgary, Edmonton and Vancouver. It also analysed the modes commuters used to travel to work, emphasising public transit and car (as driver or passenger) commute modes.

    While Canadian metropolitan areas continue to be characterized by a strong concentration of jobs in the downtown core, employment grew faster in the suburbs of Canada's largest metropolitan areas than in the city centres between 1996 and 2001. One characteristic of increasing employment in suburban locations is the shifting of manufacturing activities from the core of the city to the suburbs. Retail trade also shifted away from the central core towards more suburban locations. Relatively few workers employed outside the city centre commuted on public transit, rather, most drove or were a passenger in a car. This tendency to commute by car increased the farther the job was located from the city centre.

    Furthermore commute patterns have become more complex, with growth in suburb-to-suburb commutes outpacing traditional commute paths within the city centre, and between the city centre and suburbs. Commuters travelling from suburb to suburb were also much more likely to drive than take public transit.

    Despite the decentralization of jobs occurring in the metropolitan areas, public transit did not lose its share of commuters between 1996 and 2001. While more car traffic headed to jobs in the suburbs, a larger share of commuters heading for the city centre took public transit. This kept the total share of commuters who took public transit stable between 1996 and 2001.

    The report also found that jobs in the downtown core were higher skilled and higher paid, and that earnings increased faster for jobs in the city centre between 1996 and 2001.

    The report uses the 1996 and 2001 censuses of Canada.

    Release date: 2005-06-01

  • Articles and reports: 21-601-M2005073
    Description:

    The purpose of this study is to examine the extent to which farming practices have adjusted to the presence of urbanization in Canada.

    The adoption rates for the eight EMSs were obtained from the Farm Environmental Management Survey (FEMS) conducted in 2001 by Statistics Canada and sponsored in part by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC).

    Release date: 2005-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2005001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This bulletin examines the trends in agricultural and non-agricultural land use across Canada from 1951-2001. The analysis updates the earlier reports by Hofmann(2001) and Statistics Canada (2001).

    Release date: 2005-01-31

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2001002
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Many towns that started as agricultural trading centres have become successful and growing cities. Part of their original comparative advantage was their proximity to productive and fertile agricultural land. Now their continuing expansion is consuming this high-quality agricultural land. The purpose of this paper is to explore the amount of dependable agricultural land that has been lost to urbanisation.

    Release date: 2001-09-05
Reference (3)

Reference (3) ((3 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 96-328-M2004003
    Description:

    This activity looks at the competition between agriculture and urban development for land around urban centres and the difficulties and advantages of farming close to urban areas. The pressure to build more housing in urban areas is strong, but such development takes some of Canada's best farmland out of production permanently. Should decisions on how this land is used be left solely to the market? Students will debate the issue.

    Release date: 2004-06-09

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2001001
    Description:

    This report describes the quality indicators produced for the 1998 Survey of Household Spending. It covers the usual quality indicators that help users interpret data, such as coefficients of variation, nonresponse rates, imputation rates and the impact of imputed data on the estimates. Added to these are various less often used indicators such as slippage rates and measures of the representativity of the sample for particular characteristics that are useful for evaluating the survey methodology.

    Release date: 2001-10-15

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2001002
    Description:

    This report describes the quality indicators produced for the 1999 Survey of Household Spending. It covers the usual quality indicators that help users interpret data, such as coefficients of variation, nonresponse rates, imputation rates and the impact of imputed data on the estimates. Added to these are various less often used indicators such as slippage rates and measures of the representativity of the sample for particular characteristics that are useful for evaluating the survey methodology.

    Release date: 2001-10-15
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