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  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2007303
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In this study, we use new Canadian data containing detailed information on standardized test scores, school marks, parental and peer influences, and other socio-economic background characteristics of boys and girls to try to account for the large gender gap in university attendance. Among 19-year-old youth in 2003, 38.8% of girls had attended university, compared with only 25.7% of boys. However, young men and women were about equally likely to attend college. We find that differences in observable characteristics between boys and girls account for more than three quarters (76.8%) of the gap in university participation. In order of importance, the main factors are differences in school marks at age 15, standardized test scores in reading at age 15, study habits, parental expectations and the university earnings premium relative to high school. Altogether, the four measures of academic abilities used in the study "overall marks, performance on standardized reading tests, study habits and repeating grade" collectively account for 58.9% of the gender gap in university participation. These results suggest that understanding why girls outperform boys in the classroom may be a key to understanding the gender divide in university participation.

    Release date: 2007-09-20

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2007049
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using current major Statistics Canada data sources related to the education of Canadians, this publication presents some of what we currently know on educating health workers to begin to address some critical questions facing Canadians today: Does Canada have enough interested individuals with the right skills who want to work in health? Does it have the infrastructure, capacity, and effective education system to ensure an adequate supply of health workers to meet future health care demands? As such, the report is primarily comprised of information tables accompanied by some brief analysis intended to highlight broad findings that may guide the reader in interpreting the tables.

    Release date: 2007-08-13

  • Table: 81-595-M2007052
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This bulletin contains salary information for the year 2006-07. Information is provided for institutions that have determined salaries for the period and have responded to the survey by June 2007. This information is collected annually under the 'University and College Academic Staff Survey' and has a reference date of October 1. Therefore, the data reflect employment in universities as of that date. Each university must authorize Statistics Canada to release their information. However, information for institutions that have less than 100 full-time staff (and who responded to the survey by June 2007) are not included in this bulletin but are now available by special request to Client Services (telephone: 1 800 307-3382 or 613-951-7608; fax: 613-951-4441; TTY: 1 800 363-7629; email: educationstats@statcan.ca), Culture, Tourism and the Centre for Education Statistics, Statistics Canada, 150 Tunney's Pasture Driveway, Ottawa ON, K1A 0T6.

    Release date: 2007-08-02

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20070029989
    Description:

    Between the ages of 15 and 19, youth have three decisions to make: first, whether or not to graduate from high school; second, whether or not to go to postsecondary education; and finally, the type of institution in which to pursue that postsecondary education. Using data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS), this article examines these pathways to see if there are any differences between the provinces in the choices made by boys versus girls and by youth from lower-income backgrounds versus those from higher-income backgrounds. The target population for the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS), cohort A includes all 15 year-old students enrolled in an educational institution in Canada on December 31, 1999. Students were initially interviewed in April or May of 2000 and re-interviewed in February to May of 2002 and again, between February and June of 2004. Youth were questioned about their school and work activities for the two-year period directly prior to the interview date. Thus, the high school dropout and postsecondary participation rates presented here refer to the youth's schooling status as of December 2003, the last date for which data were collected. These results are representative of Canadian youth who were 15 years old as of December 1999.

    Release date: 2007-06-19

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X20070029607
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This release contains estimates of total spending on research and development (R&D) in the health field in Canada. Tables demonstrate expenditures on health R&D by both performer and funder from 1989 to 2006 preliminary estimates. Historical data indicates that in Canada, health R&D expenditures as a percentage of Gross Domestic Expenditures on Research and Development (GERD) are growing.

    Release date: 2007-03-30

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20060059589
    Description:

    In an increasingly knowledge-based economy, the key to equity in economic opportunity lies in equity in access to a university education. Attending university is a costly undertaking. One aspect of the costs is distance, for the many who do not live within commuting distance of a university. Using census data, a new study looks at the impact the creation of seven new universities : in British Columbia, Newfoundland and Nova Scotia : in the last 25 years has had on university attendance of local youth. The impact is positive, but not shared equally among all youth.

    Release date: 2007-02-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2007292
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper models earnings of male and female Bachelor's graduates in Canada five years after graduation. Using a university fixed-effect approach, the research finds evidence of significant (fixed) variations in earnings among graduates from different universities. Within universities, changes over time in various characteristics are correlated with changes in graduates' earnings. Increases in undergraduate enrollment are associated with declines in subsequent earnings for graduates, suggesting crowding out. For men, but not women, increases in the professor - student ratio are associated with meaningful gains in students' subsequent earnings. Models that do not condition on a student's major show increased effects of changes in a university's characteristics, with estimated effects rising up to almost two-fold. For women in particular, changes in several university characteristics are strongly associated with changes in women's choice of major. Changes in university characteristics are not strongly related to the probability of employment five years after graduation.

    Release date: 2007-02-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2007295
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In this study, I use new Canadian data containing detailed information on academic abilities, parental influences, financial constraints, and other socio-economic background characteristics of youth to try to account for the large gap in university attendance across the income distribution. I find that 96% of the total gap in university attendance between youth from the top and bottom income quartiles can be accounted for by differences in observable characteristics. Differences in long-term factors such as standardized test scores in reading obtained at age 15, school marks reported at age 15, parental influences, and high-school quality account for 84% of the gap. In contrast, only 12% of the gap is related to financial constraints. Similar results hold across different income quartiles and when I use standardized test scores in mathematics and science. However, reading scores account for a larger proportion of the gap than other test scores.

    Release date: 2007-02-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006283
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In this study, I explore the relationship between the presence of a local university in a city and university and college participation among local youth. The evidence is drawn from Census data, along with information on the creation of new university degree-granting institutions in Canada. Students who do not have access to a local university are far less likely to go on to university than students who grew up near a university, likely due to the added cost of moving away to attend, as opposed to differences in other factors (e.g., family income, parental education, academic achievement). When distant students are faced with a local option, however, their probability of attendance substantially increases. Specifically, the creation of a local degree-granting institution is associated with a 28.1% increase in university attendance among local youth, and large increases were registered in each city affected. However, the increase in university participation came at the expense of college participation in most cities. Furthermore, not everyone benefited equally from new universities. In particular, students from lower income families saw the largest increase in university participation, which is consistent with the notion that distance poses a financial barrier. Also, local aboriginal youth only saw a slight increase in university participation when faced with a local university option.

    Release date: 2007-01-25
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Table: 81-595-M2007052
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This bulletin contains salary information for the year 2006-07. Information is provided for institutions that have determined salaries for the period and have responded to the survey by June 2007. This information is collected annually under the 'University and College Academic Staff Survey' and has a reference date of October 1. Therefore, the data reflect employment in universities as of that date. Each university must authorize Statistics Canada to release their information. However, information for institutions that have less than 100 full-time staff (and who responded to the survey by June 2007) are not included in this bulletin but are now available by special request to Client Services (telephone: 1 800 307-3382 or 613-951-7608; fax: 613-951-4441; TTY: 1 800 363-7629; email: educationstats@statcan.ca), Culture, Tourism and the Centre for Education Statistics, Statistics Canada, 150 Tunney's Pasture Driveway, Ottawa ON, K1A 0T6.

    Release date: 2007-08-02
Analysis (8)

Analysis (8) ((8 results))

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2007303
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In this study, we use new Canadian data containing detailed information on standardized test scores, school marks, parental and peer influences, and other socio-economic background characteristics of boys and girls to try to account for the large gender gap in university attendance. Among 19-year-old youth in 2003, 38.8% of girls had attended university, compared with only 25.7% of boys. However, young men and women were about equally likely to attend college. We find that differences in observable characteristics between boys and girls account for more than three quarters (76.8%) of the gap in university participation. In order of importance, the main factors are differences in school marks at age 15, standardized test scores in reading at age 15, study habits, parental expectations and the university earnings premium relative to high school. Altogether, the four measures of academic abilities used in the study "overall marks, performance on standardized reading tests, study habits and repeating grade" collectively account for 58.9% of the gender gap in university participation. These results suggest that understanding why girls outperform boys in the classroom may be a key to understanding the gender divide in university participation.

    Release date: 2007-09-20

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2007049
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using current major Statistics Canada data sources related to the education of Canadians, this publication presents some of what we currently know on educating health workers to begin to address some critical questions facing Canadians today: Does Canada have enough interested individuals with the right skills who want to work in health? Does it have the infrastructure, capacity, and effective education system to ensure an adequate supply of health workers to meet future health care demands? As such, the report is primarily comprised of information tables accompanied by some brief analysis intended to highlight broad findings that may guide the reader in interpreting the tables.

    Release date: 2007-08-13

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20070029989
    Description:

    Between the ages of 15 and 19, youth have three decisions to make: first, whether or not to graduate from high school; second, whether or not to go to postsecondary education; and finally, the type of institution in which to pursue that postsecondary education. Using data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS), this article examines these pathways to see if there are any differences between the provinces in the choices made by boys versus girls and by youth from lower-income backgrounds versus those from higher-income backgrounds. The target population for the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS), cohort A includes all 15 year-old students enrolled in an educational institution in Canada on December 31, 1999. Students were initially interviewed in April or May of 2000 and re-interviewed in February to May of 2002 and again, between February and June of 2004. Youth were questioned about their school and work activities for the two-year period directly prior to the interview date. Thus, the high school dropout and postsecondary participation rates presented here refer to the youth's schooling status as of December 2003, the last date for which data were collected. These results are representative of Canadian youth who were 15 years old as of December 1999.

    Release date: 2007-06-19

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X20070029607
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This release contains estimates of total spending on research and development (R&D) in the health field in Canada. Tables demonstrate expenditures on health R&D by both performer and funder from 1989 to 2006 preliminary estimates. Historical data indicates that in Canada, health R&D expenditures as a percentage of Gross Domestic Expenditures on Research and Development (GERD) are growing.

    Release date: 2007-03-30

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20060059589
    Description:

    In an increasingly knowledge-based economy, the key to equity in economic opportunity lies in equity in access to a university education. Attending university is a costly undertaking. One aspect of the costs is distance, for the many who do not live within commuting distance of a university. Using census data, a new study looks at the impact the creation of seven new universities : in British Columbia, Newfoundland and Nova Scotia : in the last 25 years has had on university attendance of local youth. The impact is positive, but not shared equally among all youth.

    Release date: 2007-02-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2007292
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper models earnings of male and female Bachelor's graduates in Canada five years after graduation. Using a university fixed-effect approach, the research finds evidence of significant (fixed) variations in earnings among graduates from different universities. Within universities, changes over time in various characteristics are correlated with changes in graduates' earnings. Increases in undergraduate enrollment are associated with declines in subsequent earnings for graduates, suggesting crowding out. For men, but not women, increases in the professor - student ratio are associated with meaningful gains in students' subsequent earnings. Models that do not condition on a student's major show increased effects of changes in a university's characteristics, with estimated effects rising up to almost two-fold. For women in particular, changes in several university characteristics are strongly associated with changes in women's choice of major. Changes in university characteristics are not strongly related to the probability of employment five years after graduation.

    Release date: 2007-02-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2007295
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In this study, I use new Canadian data containing detailed information on academic abilities, parental influences, financial constraints, and other socio-economic background characteristics of youth to try to account for the large gap in university attendance across the income distribution. I find that 96% of the total gap in university attendance between youth from the top and bottom income quartiles can be accounted for by differences in observable characteristics. Differences in long-term factors such as standardized test scores in reading obtained at age 15, school marks reported at age 15, parental influences, and high-school quality account for 84% of the gap. In contrast, only 12% of the gap is related to financial constraints. Similar results hold across different income quartiles and when I use standardized test scores in mathematics and science. However, reading scores account for a larger proportion of the gap than other test scores.

    Release date: 2007-02-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006283
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In this study, I explore the relationship between the presence of a local university in a city and university and college participation among local youth. The evidence is drawn from Census data, along with information on the creation of new university degree-granting institutions in Canada. Students who do not have access to a local university are far less likely to go on to university than students who grew up near a university, likely due to the added cost of moving away to attend, as opposed to differences in other factors (e.g., family income, parental education, academic achievement). When distant students are faced with a local option, however, their probability of attendance substantially increases. Specifically, the creation of a local degree-granting institution is associated with a 28.1% increase in university attendance among local youth, and large increases were registered in each city affected. However, the increase in university participation came at the expense of college participation in most cities. Furthermore, not everyone benefited equally from new universities. In particular, students from lower income families saw the largest increase in university participation, which is consistent with the notion that distance poses a financial barrier. Also, local aboriginal youth only saw a slight increase in university participation when faced with a local university option.

    Release date: 2007-01-25
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