Keyword search

Filter results by

Search Help
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Type

3 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Year of publication

1 facets displayed. 1 facets selected.

Geography

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.
Sort Help
entries

Results

All (5)

All (5) ((5 results))

  • Table: 81-595-M2006048
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This bulletin presents the final set of tables which contain salary information for the year 2004-2005. This information is collected annually under the University and College Academic Staff System and has a reference date of October 1st. Therefore, the data reflect employment in universities as of that date. Each university must authorize Statistics Canada to release their information. However, information for institutions that have less than 100 full-time staff are not included.

    Release date: 2006-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20060049540
    Description:

    While the teaching profession adapts to demographic shifts in the student population, it is also experiencing changes from within. Using data from the Labour Force Survey, this article profiles university and college professors and elementary and secondary teachers from 1999 to 2005. Elementary and secondary school teachers remain the larger group, but university professors are the fastest growing one. Teachers and professors are older than the average worker. They also work longer hours during the school year.

    Release date: 2006-12-01

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X20060059284
    Description:

    The higher education sector is composed of "all universities, colleges of technology and other institutes of postsecondary education, whatever their source of finance or legal status. It also includes all research institutes, experimental stations and clinics operating under the direct control of, or administered by, or associated with higher education establishments.

    Release date: 2006-08-17

  • Table: 81-595-M2006046
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This bulletin contains salary information of full-time teaching staff at Canadian universities for the academic year 2005/2006. Information is provided for institutions that have determined salaries for the period and have responded to the survey by June 2006. This information is collected annually under the University and College Academic Staff Survey and has a reference date of October 1st. Therefore, the data reflect employment in universities as of that date. Each university must authorize Statistics Canada to release their information. However, information for institutions that have less than 100 full-time staff (and who responded to the survey by June 2006) are not included in this bulletin. This information is available by special request to Client Services, Culture, Tourism and the Centre for Education Statistics (see Contact information, below).

    Release date: 2006-07-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006276
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Based on a sample drawn from Statistics Canada's Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID: 1993 to 1998 and 1996 to 2001), the study finds that young (17 to 34 years old) and single workers were more likely than older (35 to 59 years old) and married and divorced workers to participate in adult schooling and to obtain a post-secondary certificate. Workers with less than a high school education who might have the greatest need to increase their human capital investment were less likely to participate in adult education than workers with high school or more education.

    The study shows that male workers who obtained a post-secondary certificate while staying with the same employer generally registered higher wage and earnings gains than their counterparts who did not go back to school, regardless of age and initial level of education. On the other hand, men who obtained a certificate and switched jobs generally realized no significant return to their additional education, with the exception of young men (17 to 34 years old) who would receive significant returns to a certificate, whether they switched employer or stayed with the same employer.

    Obtaining a certificate generated significant wage and earnings returns for older women (aged 35 to 59) who stayed with the same employer, and significant wage returns for young women who switched employers.

    Release date: 2006-03-24
Data (2)

Data (2) ((2 results))

  • Table: 81-595-M2006048
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This bulletin presents the final set of tables which contain salary information for the year 2004-2005. This information is collected annually under the University and College Academic Staff System and has a reference date of October 1st. Therefore, the data reflect employment in universities as of that date. Each university must authorize Statistics Canada to release their information. However, information for institutions that have less than 100 full-time staff are not included.

    Release date: 2006-12-05

  • Table: 81-595-M2006046
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This bulletin contains salary information of full-time teaching staff at Canadian universities for the academic year 2005/2006. Information is provided for institutions that have determined salaries for the period and have responded to the survey by June 2006. This information is collected annually under the University and College Academic Staff Survey and has a reference date of October 1st. Therefore, the data reflect employment in universities as of that date. Each university must authorize Statistics Canada to release their information. However, information for institutions that have less than 100 full-time staff (and who responded to the survey by June 2006) are not included in this bulletin. This information is available by special request to Client Services, Culture, Tourism and the Centre for Education Statistics (see Contact information, below).

    Release date: 2006-07-12
Analysis (3)

Analysis (3) ((3 results))

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20060049540
    Description:

    While the teaching profession adapts to demographic shifts in the student population, it is also experiencing changes from within. Using data from the Labour Force Survey, this article profiles university and college professors and elementary and secondary teachers from 1999 to 2005. Elementary and secondary school teachers remain the larger group, but university professors are the fastest growing one. Teachers and professors are older than the average worker. They also work longer hours during the school year.

    Release date: 2006-12-01

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X20060059284
    Description:

    The higher education sector is composed of "all universities, colleges of technology and other institutes of postsecondary education, whatever their source of finance or legal status. It also includes all research institutes, experimental stations and clinics operating under the direct control of, or administered by, or associated with higher education establishments.

    Release date: 2006-08-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006276
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Based on a sample drawn from Statistics Canada's Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID: 1993 to 1998 and 1996 to 2001), the study finds that young (17 to 34 years old) and single workers were more likely than older (35 to 59 years old) and married and divorced workers to participate in adult schooling and to obtain a post-secondary certificate. Workers with less than a high school education who might have the greatest need to increase their human capital investment were less likely to participate in adult education than workers with high school or more education.

    The study shows that male workers who obtained a post-secondary certificate while staying with the same employer generally registered higher wage and earnings gains than their counterparts who did not go back to school, regardless of age and initial level of education. On the other hand, men who obtained a certificate and switched jobs generally realized no significant return to their additional education, with the exception of young men (17 to 34 years old) who would receive significant returns to a certificate, whether they switched employer or stayed with the same employer.

    Obtaining a certificate generated significant wage and earnings returns for older women (aged 35 to 59) who stayed with the same employer, and significant wage returns for young women who switched employers.

    Release date: 2006-03-24
Reference (0)

Reference (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Date modified: