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All (16)

All (16) (0 to 10 of 16 results)

  • Public use microdata: 89M0025X
    Description:

    The Employment Insurance Coverage Survey provides a meaningful picture of who does or does not have access to EI benefits among the jobless and those in a situation of underemployment. The survey also covers access to maternity and parental benefits.

    Release date: 2018-11-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017393
    Description:

    The increased migration of skilled workers globally has led to a focus in the immigration literature on the economic costs of unsuccessful labour market integration. Less attention has been given to the consequences of employment difficulties, such as those related to over-education, on aspects of immigrants’ subjective well-being. Although a large proportion of immigrants experience over-education, studies examining the relationship between over-education and life satisfaction tend to concentrate on the general population. These studies find a negative relationship between over-education and life satisfaction. Since immigrant and Canadian-born (non-immigrant) workers may experience over-education differently, it is important to examine this relationship in both groups. This study examines how over-education is associated with life satisfaction among university-educated immigrant and non-immigrant workers in Canada, and accounts for differences in the degree of over-education in each group.

    Release date: 2017-05-05

  • Public use microdata: 81M0011X
    Description:

    This survey was designed to determine such factors as: the extent to which graduates of postsecondary programs had been successful in obtaining employment since graduation; the relationship between the graduates' programs of study and the employment subsequently obtained; the graduates' job and career satisfaction; the rates of under-employment and unemployment; the type of employment obtained related to career expectations and qualification requirements; and the influence of postsecondary education on occupational achievement. The information is directed towards policy makers, researchers, educators, employers and young adults-interested in postsecondary education and the transition from school to work of trade/vocational, college and university graduates.

    Release date: 2015-01-12

  • Articles and reports: 75-004-M2013001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In the aftermath of an economic downturn, young workers may experience difficulty finding their way into career employment. How many young workers are experiencing labour market instability, and why? This study provides a few answers by developing a statistical definition of employment instability, and by identifying which characteristics are most likely to be associated with labour market instability among non-student workers aged 16 to 29.

    Release date: 2013-02-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200811210766
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    During the 1991 to 2006 period, the proportion of immigrants with a university degree in jobs with low educational requirements increased, not only among recent immigrants but also among established ones. The increases for established immigrants suggest that the difficulties, which have long plagued recent immigrants, are not necessarily temporary. Changes in the profile of established immigrants - particularly language and country of origin - accounted for only a quarter of the deterioration for established immigrants.

    Release date: 2009-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700410312
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In recent years, the media have highlighted the particular difficulty of foreign-trained physicians who are unable to practice medicine in Canada. Foreign-trained engineers are another professional group encountering similar difficulties in practicing their profession. Using data from the 2001 Census of Population, this article documents the extent to which foreign trained physicians and engineers are not employed in the occupations for which they studied.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20061129544
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Discussions related to work hours are typically driven by cross-sectional studies. Much less is known about the longitudinal perspective and the persistence of long hours or periods of underemployment. The annual hours of employees are examined over a five-year period to determine what proportion experience variable work years and how their well-being is affected.

    Release date: 2007-03-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2006039
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) this study examines the labour market experience of Canadians who hold a university diploma and who worked at least one month in a job requiring no more than a high school diploma between 1993 and 2001.

    Release date: 2006-04-06

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006278
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Numerous studies of working hours have drawn important conclusions from cross-sectional surveys. For example, the share of individuals working long hours is quite large at any given point in time. Moreover, this appears to have increased over the past two decades, raising the call for policies designed to alleviate working hours discrepancies among workers, or reduce working time overall. However, if work hours vary substantially at the individual level over time, then conclusions based upon studies of cross-sectional data may be incomplete. Using longitudinal data from the Canadian Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, we find that there is substantial variation in annual working hours at the individual level. In fact, as much as half of the cross-sectional inequality in annual work hours can be explained by individual-level instability in hours. Moreover, very few individuals work chronically long hours. Instability in work hours is shown to be related to low-job quality, non-standard work, low-income levels, stress and bad health. This indicates that working variable work hours is not likely done by choice; rather, it is more likely that these workers are unable to secure more stable employment. The lack of persistence in long work hours, plus the high level of individual work hours instability undermines the equity based arguments behind working time reduction policies. Furthermore, this research points out that policies designed to reduce hours instability could benefit workers.

    Release date: 2006-03-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006279
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article summarizes findings from the research paper entitled: Work Hours Instability in Canada.

    Numerous studies of working hours have drawn important conclusions from cross-sectional surveys. For example, the share of individuals working long hours is quite large at any given point in time. Moreover, this appears to have increased over the past two decades, raising the call for policies designed to alleviate working hours discrepancies among workers, or reduce working time overall. However, if work hours vary substantially at the individual level over time, then conclusions based upon studies of cross-sectional data may be incomplete. Using longitudinal data from the Canadian Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, we find that there is substantial variation in annual working hours at the individual level. In fact, as much as half of the cross-sectional inequality in annual work hours can be explained by individual-level instability in hours. Moreover, very few individuals work chronically long hours. Instability in work hours is shown to be related to low-job quality, non-standard work, low-income levels, stress and bad health. This indicates that working variable work hours is not likely done by choice; rather, it is more likely that these workers are unable to secure more stable employment. The lack of persistence in long work hours, plus the high level of individual work hours instability undermines the equity based arguments behind working time reduction policies. Furthermore, this research points out that policies designed to reduce hours instability could benefit workers.

    Release date: 2006-03-29
Data (2)

Data (2) ((2 results))

  • Public use microdata: 89M0025X
    Description:

    The Employment Insurance Coverage Survey provides a meaningful picture of who does or does not have access to EI benefits among the jobless and those in a situation of underemployment. The survey also covers access to maternity and parental benefits.

    Release date: 2018-11-15

  • Public use microdata: 81M0011X
    Description:

    This survey was designed to determine such factors as: the extent to which graduates of postsecondary programs had been successful in obtaining employment since graduation; the relationship between the graduates' programs of study and the employment subsequently obtained; the graduates' job and career satisfaction; the rates of under-employment and unemployment; the type of employment obtained related to career expectations and qualification requirements; and the influence of postsecondary education on occupational achievement. The information is directed towards policy makers, researchers, educators, employers and young adults-interested in postsecondary education and the transition from school to work of trade/vocational, college and university graduates.

    Release date: 2015-01-12
Analysis (13)

Analysis (13) (0 to 10 of 13 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017393
    Description:

    The increased migration of skilled workers globally has led to a focus in the immigration literature on the economic costs of unsuccessful labour market integration. Less attention has been given to the consequences of employment difficulties, such as those related to over-education, on aspects of immigrants’ subjective well-being. Although a large proportion of immigrants experience over-education, studies examining the relationship between over-education and life satisfaction tend to concentrate on the general population. These studies find a negative relationship between over-education and life satisfaction. Since immigrant and Canadian-born (non-immigrant) workers may experience over-education differently, it is important to examine this relationship in both groups. This study examines how over-education is associated with life satisfaction among university-educated immigrant and non-immigrant workers in Canada, and accounts for differences in the degree of over-education in each group.

    Release date: 2017-05-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-004-M2013001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In the aftermath of an economic downturn, young workers may experience difficulty finding their way into career employment. How many young workers are experiencing labour market instability, and why? This study provides a few answers by developing a statistical definition of employment instability, and by identifying which characteristics are most likely to be associated with labour market instability among non-student workers aged 16 to 29.

    Release date: 2013-02-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200811210766
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    During the 1991 to 2006 period, the proportion of immigrants with a university degree in jobs with low educational requirements increased, not only among recent immigrants but also among established ones. The increases for established immigrants suggest that the difficulties, which have long plagued recent immigrants, are not necessarily temporary. Changes in the profile of established immigrants - particularly language and country of origin - accounted for only a quarter of the deterioration for established immigrants.

    Release date: 2009-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700410312
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In recent years, the media have highlighted the particular difficulty of foreign-trained physicians who are unable to practice medicine in Canada. Foreign-trained engineers are another professional group encountering similar difficulties in practicing their profession. Using data from the 2001 Census of Population, this article documents the extent to which foreign trained physicians and engineers are not employed in the occupations for which they studied.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20061129544
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Discussions related to work hours are typically driven by cross-sectional studies. Much less is known about the longitudinal perspective and the persistence of long hours or periods of underemployment. The annual hours of employees are examined over a five-year period to determine what proportion experience variable work years and how their well-being is affected.

    Release date: 2007-03-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2006039
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) this study examines the labour market experience of Canadians who hold a university diploma and who worked at least one month in a job requiring no more than a high school diploma between 1993 and 2001.

    Release date: 2006-04-06

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006278
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Numerous studies of working hours have drawn important conclusions from cross-sectional surveys. For example, the share of individuals working long hours is quite large at any given point in time. Moreover, this appears to have increased over the past two decades, raising the call for policies designed to alleviate working hours discrepancies among workers, or reduce working time overall. However, if work hours vary substantially at the individual level over time, then conclusions based upon studies of cross-sectional data may be incomplete. Using longitudinal data from the Canadian Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, we find that there is substantial variation in annual working hours at the individual level. In fact, as much as half of the cross-sectional inequality in annual work hours can be explained by individual-level instability in hours. Moreover, very few individuals work chronically long hours. Instability in work hours is shown to be related to low-job quality, non-standard work, low-income levels, stress and bad health. This indicates that working variable work hours is not likely done by choice; rather, it is more likely that these workers are unable to secure more stable employment. The lack of persistence in long work hours, plus the high level of individual work hours instability undermines the equity based arguments behind working time reduction policies. Furthermore, this research points out that policies designed to reduce hours instability could benefit workers.

    Release date: 2006-03-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006279
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article summarizes findings from the research paper entitled: Work Hours Instability in Canada.

    Numerous studies of working hours have drawn important conclusions from cross-sectional surveys. For example, the share of individuals working long hours is quite large at any given point in time. Moreover, this appears to have increased over the past two decades, raising the call for policies designed to alleviate working hours discrepancies among workers, or reduce working time overall. However, if work hours vary substantially at the individual level over time, then conclusions based upon studies of cross-sectional data may be incomplete. Using longitudinal data from the Canadian Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, we find that there is substantial variation in annual working hours at the individual level. In fact, as much as half of the cross-sectional inequality in annual work hours can be explained by individual-level instability in hours. Moreover, very few individuals work chronically long hours. Instability in work hours is shown to be related to low-job quality, non-standard work, low-income levels, stress and bad health. This indicates that working variable work hours is not likely done by choice; rather, it is more likely that these workers are unable to secure more stable employment. The lack of persistence in long work hours, plus the high level of individual work hours instability undermines the equity based arguments behind working time reduction policies. Furthermore, this research points out that policies designed to reduce hours instability could benefit workers.

    Release date: 2006-03-29

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410613121
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the problems new immigrants have when looking for a job in Canada, including non-recognition of their credentials, their education level, and their experience abroad.

    Release date: 2004-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2000003
    Description:

    This article analyzes the longitudinal aspect of involuntary part-time work from 1993 to 1996 using data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID).

    Release date: 2000-04-11
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