Keyword search

Sort Help
entries

Results

All (53)

All (53) (0 to 10 of 53 results)

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2017084
    Description:

    The Tourism Satellite Account (TSA) measures the economic importance of tourism in Canada. The TSA extracts economic information on tourism from the Canadian System of Macroeconomic Accounts (CSMA). It uses the same measures of inputs, outputs, GDP and employment as the CSMA, and reorganizes information on tourism following the Tourism Satellite Account: Recommended Methodological Framework.

    Release date: 2017-03-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-630-X2017001
    Description:

    This issue of Canadian Megatrends takes a historical look at Canadian tourism, describing the long-term changes in who has been visiting Canada—and where Canadians have been visiting.

    Release date: 2017-01-16

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2014074
    Description:

    This paper reports on the Provincial-Territorial Human Resource Module of the Tourism Satellite Account, 2012 developed by Statistics Canada. This study provides detailed information on employment related to tourism in Canada by province and territory. Information on wages and salaries, number of jobs and hours worked by occupation is included. The data are also disaggregated by age, sex and immigration status. This study provides a resource for training and planning for tourism in Canada. The report is based upon data published as of November 20, 2013.

    This study was prepared by Terrence Martin of the Satellite Accounts and Special Studies Section, National Economic Accounts Division, Statistics Canada. The study was funded through a partnership agreement with the Canadian Tourism Human Resource Council.

    Release date: 2014-06-16

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2013072
    Description:

    This paper reports on the Human Resource Module of the Tourism Satellite Account, 2012 developed by Statistics Canada. This study provides detailed information on employment related to tourism in Canada. Information on wages and salaries, number of jobs and hours worked by occupation are included. The data are also disaggregated by age, gender and immigration status. This study provides a resource for training and planning for tourism in Canada. This paper is based upon data published as of May 19, 2013.

    Release date: 2013-07-05

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2009063
    Description:

    This paper highlights the Canadian Tourism Satellite Account (CTSA) developed by Statistics Canada. The CTSA provides an economic measure of the importance of tourism in terms of expenditures, Gross Domestic Product and employment for Canada. It permits a comparison of tourism with other industries within Canada since the concepts and methods used are based on the framework of the Canadian System of National Accounts. The study revealed that tourism is an important part of Canada's well diversified economy. This paper presents the results of the CTSA for reference year 2004.

    This study was prepared by staff of the Research and Development Projects and Analysis Section, Income and Expenditure Accounts Division, Statistics Canada. The study was funded by the Canadian Tourism Commission.

    Release date: 2009-12-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010988
    Description:

    Online data collection emerged in 1995 as an alternative approach for conducting certain types of consumer research studies and has grown in 2008. This growth has been primarily in studies where non-probability sampling methods are used. While online sampling has gained acceptance for some research applications, serious questions remain concerning online samples' suitability for research requiring precise volumetric measurement of the behavior of the U.S. population, particularly their travel behavior. This paper reviews literature and compares results from studies using probability samples and online samples to understand whether results differ from the two sampling approaches. The paper also demonstrates that online samples underestimate critical types of travel even after demographic and geographic weighting.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900110850
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Several decades of tourism research generally conclude that the benefits people expect to derive from their travel experience are better predictors of their travel behaviour than their income or other socio-demographic characteristics. Using the 2006 Travel and Activity Motivation Survey, this article uses an eight-point index to quantify the value of the three most popular benefits of vacation or pleasure travel: rest and relaxation; nurturing family and friendship ties; and learning and discovery. We compare the value of a given benefit for different kinds of travellers, and compare the value of one benefit relative to another.

    Release date: 2009-05-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200701210464
    Geography: Geographical region of Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines whether cross-border shopping has taken flight with the loonie. It finds that measured by the number of trips to the US, the average spent per trip or even online purchases, the recent increase in cross-border shopping has been minimal, especially outside of Ontario. More notable is the drop in US visitors to Canada. Meanwhile, overseas travel in and out of Canada continues to grow rapidly.

    Release date: 2007-12-13

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2006049
    Description:

    This article looks at how the growing popularity of Internet reservations is affecting Canada's travel arrangement and travel accommodation industries. While few tour operators perceived their growth was dampened by Internet reservations in 2003, nearly two-thirds of travel agencies felt that Internet reservations were detrimental to their business. As Internet-savvy travelers become more comfortable assembling their own travel packages on-line they are increasingly bypassing travel agencies, especially those with no Internet presence.

    The article also suggests that, along with a sharp decline in the number of foreign tourists visiting Canada, the greater prevalence of Internet reservations dampened room prices and operating profits from 2001 to 2003 for traveler accommodations providers, particularly non-affiliated ones.

    Release date: 2006-01-19

  • Articles and reports: 63-018-X20060018804
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article looks at how the growing popularity of Internet reservations is affecting Canada's travel arrangement and travel accommodation industries. While few tour operators perceived their growth was dampened by Internet reservations in 2003, nearly two-thirds of travel agencies felt that Internet reservations were detrimental to their business. As Internet-savvy travelers become more comfortable assembling their own travel packages on-line they are increasingly bypassing travel agencies, especially those with no Internet presence.

    The article also suggests that, along with a sharp decline in the number of foreign tourists visiting Canada, the greater prevalence of Internet reservations dampened room prices and operating profits from 2001 to 2003 for traveler accommodations providers, particularly non-affiliated ones.

    Release date: 2006-01-12
Data (0)

Data (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Analysis (53)

Analysis (53) (0 to 10 of 53 results)

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2017084
    Description:

    The Tourism Satellite Account (TSA) measures the economic importance of tourism in Canada. The TSA extracts economic information on tourism from the Canadian System of Macroeconomic Accounts (CSMA). It uses the same measures of inputs, outputs, GDP and employment as the CSMA, and reorganizes information on tourism following the Tourism Satellite Account: Recommended Methodological Framework.

    Release date: 2017-03-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-630-X2017001
    Description:

    This issue of Canadian Megatrends takes a historical look at Canadian tourism, describing the long-term changes in who has been visiting Canada—and where Canadians have been visiting.

    Release date: 2017-01-16

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2014074
    Description:

    This paper reports on the Provincial-Territorial Human Resource Module of the Tourism Satellite Account, 2012 developed by Statistics Canada. This study provides detailed information on employment related to tourism in Canada by province and territory. Information on wages and salaries, number of jobs and hours worked by occupation is included. The data are also disaggregated by age, sex and immigration status. This study provides a resource for training and planning for tourism in Canada. The report is based upon data published as of November 20, 2013.

    This study was prepared by Terrence Martin of the Satellite Accounts and Special Studies Section, National Economic Accounts Division, Statistics Canada. The study was funded through a partnership agreement with the Canadian Tourism Human Resource Council.

    Release date: 2014-06-16

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2013072
    Description:

    This paper reports on the Human Resource Module of the Tourism Satellite Account, 2012 developed by Statistics Canada. This study provides detailed information on employment related to tourism in Canada. Information on wages and salaries, number of jobs and hours worked by occupation are included. The data are also disaggregated by age, gender and immigration status. This study provides a resource for training and planning for tourism in Canada. This paper is based upon data published as of May 19, 2013.

    Release date: 2013-07-05

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2009063
    Description:

    This paper highlights the Canadian Tourism Satellite Account (CTSA) developed by Statistics Canada. The CTSA provides an economic measure of the importance of tourism in terms of expenditures, Gross Domestic Product and employment for Canada. It permits a comparison of tourism with other industries within Canada since the concepts and methods used are based on the framework of the Canadian System of National Accounts. The study revealed that tourism is an important part of Canada's well diversified economy. This paper presents the results of the CTSA for reference year 2004.

    This study was prepared by staff of the Research and Development Projects and Analysis Section, Income and Expenditure Accounts Division, Statistics Canada. The study was funded by the Canadian Tourism Commission.

    Release date: 2009-12-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010988
    Description:

    Online data collection emerged in 1995 as an alternative approach for conducting certain types of consumer research studies and has grown in 2008. This growth has been primarily in studies where non-probability sampling methods are used. While online sampling has gained acceptance for some research applications, serious questions remain concerning online samples' suitability for research requiring precise volumetric measurement of the behavior of the U.S. population, particularly their travel behavior. This paper reviews literature and compares results from studies using probability samples and online samples to understand whether results differ from the two sampling approaches. The paper also demonstrates that online samples underestimate critical types of travel even after demographic and geographic weighting.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900110850
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Several decades of tourism research generally conclude that the benefits people expect to derive from their travel experience are better predictors of their travel behaviour than their income or other socio-demographic characteristics. Using the 2006 Travel and Activity Motivation Survey, this article uses an eight-point index to quantify the value of the three most popular benefits of vacation or pleasure travel: rest and relaxation; nurturing family and friendship ties; and learning and discovery. We compare the value of a given benefit for different kinds of travellers, and compare the value of one benefit relative to another.

    Release date: 2009-05-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200701210464
    Geography: Geographical region of Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines whether cross-border shopping has taken flight with the loonie. It finds that measured by the number of trips to the US, the average spent per trip or even online purchases, the recent increase in cross-border shopping has been minimal, especially outside of Ontario. More notable is the drop in US visitors to Canada. Meanwhile, overseas travel in and out of Canada continues to grow rapidly.

    Release date: 2007-12-13

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2006049
    Description:

    This article looks at how the growing popularity of Internet reservations is affecting Canada's travel arrangement and travel accommodation industries. While few tour operators perceived their growth was dampened by Internet reservations in 2003, nearly two-thirds of travel agencies felt that Internet reservations were detrimental to their business. As Internet-savvy travelers become more comfortable assembling their own travel packages on-line they are increasingly bypassing travel agencies, especially those with no Internet presence.

    The article also suggests that, along with a sharp decline in the number of foreign tourists visiting Canada, the greater prevalence of Internet reservations dampened room prices and operating profits from 2001 to 2003 for traveler accommodations providers, particularly non-affiliated ones.

    Release date: 2006-01-19

  • Articles and reports: 63-018-X20060018804
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article looks at how the growing popularity of Internet reservations is affecting Canada's travel arrangement and travel accommodation industries. While few tour operators perceived their growth was dampened by Internet reservations in 2003, nearly two-thirds of travel agencies felt that Internet reservations were detrimental to their business. As Internet-savvy travelers become more comfortable assembling their own travel packages on-line they are increasingly bypassing travel agencies, especially those with no Internet presence.

    The article also suggests that, along with a sharp decline in the number of foreign tourists visiting Canada, the greater prevalence of Internet reservations dampened room prices and operating profits from 2001 to 2003 for traveler accommodations providers, particularly non-affiliated ones.

    Release date: 2006-01-12
Reference (0)

Reference (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Date modified: