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  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20000138386
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory, Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This report provides an overview of residential, business and 'other' break and enter (B & E) offences in Canada, including trends at the national, provincial and metropolitan area levels, as well as characteristics of B & E incidents, accused persons and victims. In addition the offence known as "home invasion" is also discussed. Data are examined from both the Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) survey and the General Social Survey (GSS) on victimization. Data from both youth and adult court are examined to look at the types of sentences being given to persons convicted of B & E offences.

    Release date: 2000-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20000128385
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    In 1999, as part of its General Social Survey program, Statistics Canada conducted a survey on victimization and public perceptions of crime and the justice system. It was the third time that the General Social Survey (GSS) had examined victimization - previous surveys were conducted in 1993 and 1988.

    For the 1999 survey, interviews were conducted by telephone with approximately 26,000 people, aged 15 and older, living in the 10 provinces. Respondents were asked for their opinions concerning the level of crime in their neighbourhood, their fear of crime and their views concerning the performance of the justice system. They were also asked about their attitudes toward sentencing adult and young offenders. Respondents were randomly presented with one of four hypothetical situations for which they were asked to choose "prison" or "non-prison". Respondents who selected prison sentences were given a follow-up question that asked them whether a sentence of one year of probation and 200 hours of community work was an acceptable alternative to the prison sentence.

    This Juristat examines public attitudes toward sentencing adult and young offenders. It also analyzes public attitudes toward four sectors of the justice system including, the police, the criminal courts, the prison and parole systems.

    Release date: 2000-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20000108383
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    In 1999, as part of its General Social Survey program, Statistics Canada conducted a survey on victimization and public perceptions of crime and the justice system. It was the third time that the General Social Survey (GSS) had examined victimization - previous surveys were conducted in 1993 and 1988.

    For the 1999 survey, interviews were conducted by telephone with approximately 26,000 people, aged 15 and older, living in the 10 provinces. Respondents were asked for their opinions concerning the level of crime in their neighbourhood, their fear of crime and their views concerning the performance of the justice system. They were also asked about their experiences with criminal victimization. Those respondents who had been victims of a crime in the previous 12 months were asked for detailed information on each incident, including when and where it occurred; whether the incident was reported to the police; and how they were affected by the experience.

    This Juristat presents an overview of the findings of the 1999 General Social Survey and makes comparisons to results from 1993 and 1988.

    Release date: 2000-11-02

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20000088381
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This Juristat presents and analyzes information on young offender admissions to custody and community services, with breakdowns by custody (secure custody, open custody, remand) and probation, and key case characteristics such as age, sex, Aboriginal/non-Aboriginal status, and most serious offence. In addition, it includes data pertaining to releases from remand, secure custody, and open custody by sex and time served. These breakdowns are presented and analyzed at the national and provincial/territorial level.

    Data summarized in this Juristat are primarily drawn from the national Youth Custody and Community Services (YCCS) Survey. The scope of the survey is to collect and analyze information on the application of dispositions under the Young Offenders Act from provincial and territorial agencies responsible for youth corrections and programs.

    Release date: 2000-09-29

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20000058378
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report is an examination of the annual police-reported crime in Canada. Data are presented within the context of both short and long term trends. The analysis focuses on trends in violent crime, property crime, impaired driving offences, drug offences and youth crime. Crime rates are examined at the national and provincial/territorial level, as well as for major metropolitan areas. The trend in Canada's crime rate is put into perspective by comparing it with crime trends in some other industrialized countries. Detailed information on incidents, accused and victims is also presented when appropriate. This is an annual periodical of great interest to those who work within the criminal justice system or anyone who is interested in crime in Canada.

    Release date: 2000-07-18

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20000048377
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning Canada's justice system. Annual Juristats are produced on areas such as: crime, homicide, youth and adult courts, and corrections. Additional Juristats are also produced each year on current topics of interest to the justice community. This is a unique periodical, of great interest to those who have to plan, establish, administer and evaluate justice programs and projects, or anyone who has an interest in Canada's justice system

    Release date: 2000-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20000028375
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 1998/99, 106,665 cases were processed in the youth courts of Canada. This represents a 4% decrease from the previous year and a decrease of 7% from 1992/93. It also represents a 13% decrease in the number of cases per 10,000 youths from 1992/93; since that year, the rate has dropped from 500 cases to 435 cases.

    From 1992/93 to 1998/99, the rate of property crime cases decreased annually, dropping 31% over this period. On the other hand, the rate of violent crime cases has increased by 2% since 1992/93.

    Release date: 2000-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20000018374
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning Canada's justice system. The annual Juristat, Adult Criminal Court Statistics, 1998/99, summarizes trends from provincial/territorial courts across Canada, which provided data to the Adult Criminal Court Survey (ACCS) for the 1998/99 fiscal year. In this Juristat, information is presented on the characteristics of cases and accused persons, the number of appearances, conviction rates, sentencing trends and related issues. As well, for the first time, statistics are presented for a five-year period (1994/95 through 1998/99).

    Release date: 2000-03-31

  • Journals and periodicals: 85F0031X
    Geography: Province or territory, Census metropolitan area, Census agglomeration
    Description:

    Data on Aboriginal status contained in this report are based on self-reported (Census) and/or observational (crime) data. They provide information on the nature and extent of Aboriginal involvement in urban, rural and reserve crime as well as the socio-demographic profile of the population of Saskatchewan.

    Based on the 1996 Census data, the Aboriginal population in Saskatchewan tend to be younger, have lower educational levels, higher unemployment rates, and substantially lower incomes than the non-Aboriginal population. Crime rates on reserves were two times higher than rates in rural or urban areas of the province. For violent offences, the rate was almost five times higher on-reserve than in urban or rural areas.

    In all three areas (reserves, urban and rural areas), a larger proportion of adults than youth was accused of a violent offence or an "other" Criminal Code offence. In contrast, youth were more often accused of a property offence than any other offence type. In urban areas, there is an over-representation of Aboriginal persons involved in the criminal justice system. In 1997, more than one-half (52%) of those accused in Prince Albert, Regina and Saskatoon were Aboriginal compared to their 9% proportion in the population of these cities.

    A substantial difference in the male-female ratio of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal accused was found. Although the majority of all those accused were male, there was a greater proportion of Aboriginal female than non-Aboriginal female accused. Aboriginal accused tended to be younger than non-Aboriginal accused. Almost one-third (31%) of Aboriginal accused were aged 12 to 17 years of age compared to 23% of non-Aboriginal accused.

    In the two cities where victim data were available (Regina and Prince Albert), there was a greater proportion of Aboriginal than non-Aboriginal victims of violent crime compared to their proportion in the overall population of these cities. In 1997, 42% of victims in Prince Albert and Regina were Aboriginal, compared to their 10% proportion in the population of these cities.

    Release date: 2000-01-31
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Analysis (9)

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  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20000138386
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory, Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This report provides an overview of residential, business and 'other' break and enter (B & E) offences in Canada, including trends at the national, provincial and metropolitan area levels, as well as characteristics of B & E incidents, accused persons and victims. In addition the offence known as "home invasion" is also discussed. Data are examined from both the Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) survey and the General Social Survey (GSS) on victimization. Data from both youth and adult court are examined to look at the types of sentences being given to persons convicted of B & E offences.

    Release date: 2000-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20000128385
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    In 1999, as part of its General Social Survey program, Statistics Canada conducted a survey on victimization and public perceptions of crime and the justice system. It was the third time that the General Social Survey (GSS) had examined victimization - previous surveys were conducted in 1993 and 1988.

    For the 1999 survey, interviews were conducted by telephone with approximately 26,000 people, aged 15 and older, living in the 10 provinces. Respondents were asked for their opinions concerning the level of crime in their neighbourhood, their fear of crime and their views concerning the performance of the justice system. They were also asked about their attitudes toward sentencing adult and young offenders. Respondents were randomly presented with one of four hypothetical situations for which they were asked to choose "prison" or "non-prison". Respondents who selected prison sentences were given a follow-up question that asked them whether a sentence of one year of probation and 200 hours of community work was an acceptable alternative to the prison sentence.

    This Juristat examines public attitudes toward sentencing adult and young offenders. It also analyzes public attitudes toward four sectors of the justice system including, the police, the criminal courts, the prison and parole systems.

    Release date: 2000-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20000108383
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    In 1999, as part of its General Social Survey program, Statistics Canada conducted a survey on victimization and public perceptions of crime and the justice system. It was the third time that the General Social Survey (GSS) had examined victimization - previous surveys were conducted in 1993 and 1988.

    For the 1999 survey, interviews were conducted by telephone with approximately 26,000 people, aged 15 and older, living in the 10 provinces. Respondents were asked for their opinions concerning the level of crime in their neighbourhood, their fear of crime and their views concerning the performance of the justice system. They were also asked about their experiences with criminal victimization. Those respondents who had been victims of a crime in the previous 12 months were asked for detailed information on each incident, including when and where it occurred; whether the incident was reported to the police; and how they were affected by the experience.

    This Juristat presents an overview of the findings of the 1999 General Social Survey and makes comparisons to results from 1993 and 1988.

    Release date: 2000-11-02

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20000088381
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This Juristat presents and analyzes information on young offender admissions to custody and community services, with breakdowns by custody (secure custody, open custody, remand) and probation, and key case characteristics such as age, sex, Aboriginal/non-Aboriginal status, and most serious offence. In addition, it includes data pertaining to releases from remand, secure custody, and open custody by sex and time served. These breakdowns are presented and analyzed at the national and provincial/territorial level.

    Data summarized in this Juristat are primarily drawn from the national Youth Custody and Community Services (YCCS) Survey. The scope of the survey is to collect and analyze information on the application of dispositions under the Young Offenders Act from provincial and territorial agencies responsible for youth corrections and programs.

    Release date: 2000-09-29

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20000058378
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report is an examination of the annual police-reported crime in Canada. Data are presented within the context of both short and long term trends. The analysis focuses on trends in violent crime, property crime, impaired driving offences, drug offences and youth crime. Crime rates are examined at the national and provincial/territorial level, as well as for major metropolitan areas. The trend in Canada's crime rate is put into perspective by comparing it with crime trends in some other industrialized countries. Detailed information on incidents, accused and victims is also presented when appropriate. This is an annual periodical of great interest to those who work within the criminal justice system or anyone who is interested in crime in Canada.

    Release date: 2000-07-18

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20000048377
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning Canada's justice system. Annual Juristats are produced on areas such as: crime, homicide, youth and adult courts, and corrections. Additional Juristats are also produced each year on current topics of interest to the justice community. This is a unique periodical, of great interest to those who have to plan, establish, administer and evaluate justice programs and projects, or anyone who has an interest in Canada's justice system

    Release date: 2000-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20000028375
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 1998/99, 106,665 cases were processed in the youth courts of Canada. This represents a 4% decrease from the previous year and a decrease of 7% from 1992/93. It also represents a 13% decrease in the number of cases per 10,000 youths from 1992/93; since that year, the rate has dropped from 500 cases to 435 cases.

    From 1992/93 to 1998/99, the rate of property crime cases decreased annually, dropping 31% over this period. On the other hand, the rate of violent crime cases has increased by 2% since 1992/93.

    Release date: 2000-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20000018374
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning Canada's justice system. The annual Juristat, Adult Criminal Court Statistics, 1998/99, summarizes trends from provincial/territorial courts across Canada, which provided data to the Adult Criminal Court Survey (ACCS) for the 1998/99 fiscal year. In this Juristat, information is presented on the characteristics of cases and accused persons, the number of appearances, conviction rates, sentencing trends and related issues. As well, for the first time, statistics are presented for a five-year period (1994/95 through 1998/99).

    Release date: 2000-03-31

  • Journals and periodicals: 85F0031X
    Geography: Province or territory, Census metropolitan area, Census agglomeration
    Description:

    Data on Aboriginal status contained in this report are based on self-reported (Census) and/or observational (crime) data. They provide information on the nature and extent of Aboriginal involvement in urban, rural and reserve crime as well as the socio-demographic profile of the population of Saskatchewan.

    Based on the 1996 Census data, the Aboriginal population in Saskatchewan tend to be younger, have lower educational levels, higher unemployment rates, and substantially lower incomes than the non-Aboriginal population. Crime rates on reserves were two times higher than rates in rural or urban areas of the province. For violent offences, the rate was almost five times higher on-reserve than in urban or rural areas.

    In all three areas (reserves, urban and rural areas), a larger proportion of adults than youth was accused of a violent offence or an "other" Criminal Code offence. In contrast, youth were more often accused of a property offence than any other offence type. In urban areas, there is an over-representation of Aboriginal persons involved in the criminal justice system. In 1997, more than one-half (52%) of those accused in Prince Albert, Regina and Saskatoon were Aboriginal compared to their 9% proportion in the population of these cities.

    A substantial difference in the male-female ratio of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal accused was found. Although the majority of all those accused were male, there was a greater proportion of Aboriginal female than non-Aboriginal female accused. Aboriginal accused tended to be younger than non-Aboriginal accused. Almost one-third (31%) of Aboriginal accused were aged 12 to 17 years of age compared to 23% of non-Aboriginal accused.

    In the two cities where victim data were available (Regina and Prince Albert), there was a greater proportion of Aboriginal than non-Aboriginal victims of violent crime compared to their proportion in the overall population of these cities. In 1997, 42% of victims in Prince Albert and Regina were Aboriginal, compared to their 10% proportion in the population of these cities.

    Release date: 2000-01-31
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