Keyword search

Filter results by

Search Help
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Type

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Year of publication

2 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.
Sort Help
entries

Results

All (2)

All (2) ((2 results))

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2015096
    Description:

    This analysis examines provincial income convergence in Canada from 1926 to 2011 using National Accounts-based estimates of per capita household disposable income. Household disposable income is the income available for consumption and saving, and is, therefore, closely aligned with material well-being.

    Convergence is a long-run tendency for income levels between economies to become more similar. In its most literal sense, convergence implies that all provincial per capita disposable incomes across Canada will eventually reach the same level. Less exacting forms of convergence allow for differences in per capita income levels due to structural differences across provinces. Factors such as resource endowments, urbanization, human capital, and industry structure are believed to be sources of such differences.

    Release date: 2015-02-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2014037
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article looks closely at Canadian enterprises that employ individuals in more than one province or territory. It studies the share of business sector enterprises, and the employment accounted for by these multi-jurisdiction enterprises, both over time and across industries. It also examines the regional mix of these enterprises, and asks if most of them are Canadian controlled.

    Release date: 2014-09-05
Data (0)

Data (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Analysis (2)

Analysis (2) ((2 results))

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2015096
    Description:

    This analysis examines provincial income convergence in Canada from 1926 to 2011 using National Accounts-based estimates of per capita household disposable income. Household disposable income is the income available for consumption and saving, and is, therefore, closely aligned with material well-being.

    Convergence is a long-run tendency for income levels between economies to become more similar. In its most literal sense, convergence implies that all provincial per capita disposable incomes across Canada will eventually reach the same level. Less exacting forms of convergence allow for differences in per capita income levels due to structural differences across provinces. Factors such as resource endowments, urbanization, human capital, and industry structure are believed to be sources of such differences.

    Release date: 2015-02-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2014037
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article looks closely at Canadian enterprises that employ individuals in more than one province or territory. It studies the share of business sector enterprises, and the employment accounted for by these multi-jurisdiction enterprises, both over time and across industries. It also examines the regional mix of these enterprises, and asks if most of them are Canadian controlled.

    Release date: 2014-09-05
Reference (0)

Reference (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Date modified: