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  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2008016
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Internet's rapid and profound entry into our lives quite understandably makes people wonder how, both individually and collectively, we have been affected by it. When major shifts in technology use occur, utopian and dystopian views of their impact on society often abound, reflecting their disruptiveness and people's concerns. Given its complex uses, the Internet, both as a technology and as an environment, has had both beneficial and deleterious effects. Above all, though, it has had transformative effects.

    Are Canadians becoming more isolated, more reclusive and less integrated in their communities as they use the Internet? Or, are they becoming more participatory and more integrated in their communities? In addition, do these communities still resemble traditional communities, or are they becoming more like social networks than cohesive groups?

    To address these questions, this article organizes, analyzes and presents existing Canadian evidence. It uses survey results and research amassed by Statistics Canada and the Connected Lives project in Toronto to explore the role of the Internet in social engagement and the opportunities it represents for Canadians to be active citizens. It finds that Internet users are at least as socially engaged as non-users. They have large networks and frequent interactions with friends and family, although they tend to spend somewhat less in-person time and, of course, more time online. An appreciable number of Internet users are civically and politically engaged, using the Internet to find out about opportunities and make contact with others.

    Release date: 2008-12-04

  • Journals and periodicals: 56F0004M
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Connectedness series publishes analytical studies as well as research reports in the broad area of connectedness. This includes the industrial areas of telecommunications, broadcasting, computer services and Internet Service Providers as well as cross economy activities such as the Internet and electronic commerce. It offers a statistical perspective in these emerging phenomena that are changing the economic and societal landscape of the country.

    All papers are subject to peer and institutional review as well as review by subject matter experts, as necessary.

    Release date: 2008-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800210739
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The 2006 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) included two questions that dealt with the issues of organizational and technological change. This article will examine organizational and technological change in the private and public sectors, providing the first look at this cross-economy data. An upcoming article will explore the relationship between the introduction of significantly improved organizational structures, management techniques, or technology and the training associated with implementation of these changes.

    Release date: 2008-11-21

  • Table: 88-001-X2008007
    Description:

    Release date: 2008-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008069
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    "Doctorate Education in Canada: Findings from the Survey of Earned Doctorates, 2005/2006" is the third paper in a series of reports written by the Learning Policy Directorate of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC) and the Centre for Education Statistics of Statistics Canada. Each report presents an overview of doctoral education covering annual data from the Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED) from each of the three years of the survey's existence (2003/2004, 2004/2005 and 2005/2006).

    The Survey of Earned Doctorates is a key source of information regarding the training of doctoral graduates in Canada. It provides information on the pathways of these highly qualified graduates through the education system and sheds light into the expectations of graduates as they transition into employment and postdoctoral education.

    In this 2005/2006 report, special attention has been given to the foreign born among the doctoral graduates. Foreign-born graduates represent more than one in every five graduates in the 2005/2006 academic year, and over half of all doctoral graduates living in Canada in 2006. Canada's immigration policy, with its emphasis on educational attainment, ensures that the foreign born will continue to account for a large proportion of Canada's doctorate degree holders. Furthermore, attracting foreign-born talent to Canada will be important if Canada is to increase the number of doctoral degree holders, since growth in the graduates from Canadian institutions has been minimal. One of the key challenges will be to retain graduates, both foreign-born and Canadian-born, in Canada upon the completion of their degree.

    Also unique to this third report, is the ability to discuss trends over the three years of survey data.

    Release date: 2008-10-17

  • Stats in brief: 56-001-X200800110653
    Description:

    This publication presents financial and operating statistics for telecommunications services industries, except the Cable and Other Program Distribution industry.

    Release date: 2008-09-02

  • Table: 88-001-X2008004
    Description:

    Release date: 2008-08-14

  • Table: 89-628-X2008006
    Description:

    The Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) is Canada's national survey that gathers information about adults and children whose daily activities are limited by a physical, mental, or other health-related condition or problem. This report presents a series of tables on the use and need for assistive technology for people with disabilities as well as sources of payment and reasons for not having this technology.

    Release date: 2008-06-03

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X200800210604
    Description:

    Data on science and technology (S&T) expenditures and full-time equivalent personnel allocated to biotechnology for fiscal year 2006/2007 were collected from selected federal government departments and agencies.The biotechnology S&T data comprise expenditures on research and development (R&D) and related scientific activities (RSA) for both intramural and extramural performers and the full-time equivalent personnel associated with these activities.

    Release date: 2008-06-02

  • Table: 88-001-X2008002
    Description:

    Release date: 2008-06-02
Data (4)

Data (4) ((4 results))

Analysis (10)

Analysis (10) ((10 results))

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2008016
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Internet's rapid and profound entry into our lives quite understandably makes people wonder how, both individually and collectively, we have been affected by it. When major shifts in technology use occur, utopian and dystopian views of their impact on society often abound, reflecting their disruptiveness and people's concerns. Given its complex uses, the Internet, both as a technology and as an environment, has had both beneficial and deleterious effects. Above all, though, it has had transformative effects.

    Are Canadians becoming more isolated, more reclusive and less integrated in their communities as they use the Internet? Or, are they becoming more participatory and more integrated in their communities? In addition, do these communities still resemble traditional communities, or are they becoming more like social networks than cohesive groups?

    To address these questions, this article organizes, analyzes and presents existing Canadian evidence. It uses survey results and research amassed by Statistics Canada and the Connected Lives project in Toronto to explore the role of the Internet in social engagement and the opportunities it represents for Canadians to be active citizens. It finds that Internet users are at least as socially engaged as non-users. They have large networks and frequent interactions with friends and family, although they tend to spend somewhat less in-person time and, of course, more time online. An appreciable number of Internet users are civically and politically engaged, using the Internet to find out about opportunities and make contact with others.

    Release date: 2008-12-04

  • Journals and periodicals: 56F0004M
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Connectedness series publishes analytical studies as well as research reports in the broad area of connectedness. This includes the industrial areas of telecommunications, broadcasting, computer services and Internet Service Providers as well as cross economy activities such as the Internet and electronic commerce. It offers a statistical perspective in these emerging phenomena that are changing the economic and societal landscape of the country.

    All papers are subject to peer and institutional review as well as review by subject matter experts, as necessary.

    Release date: 2008-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800210739
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The 2006 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) included two questions that dealt with the issues of organizational and technological change. This article will examine organizational and technological change in the private and public sectors, providing the first look at this cross-economy data. An upcoming article will explore the relationship between the introduction of significantly improved organizational structures, management techniques, or technology and the training associated with implementation of these changes.

    Release date: 2008-11-21

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008069
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    "Doctorate Education in Canada: Findings from the Survey of Earned Doctorates, 2005/2006" is the third paper in a series of reports written by the Learning Policy Directorate of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC) and the Centre for Education Statistics of Statistics Canada. Each report presents an overview of doctoral education covering annual data from the Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED) from each of the three years of the survey's existence (2003/2004, 2004/2005 and 2005/2006).

    The Survey of Earned Doctorates is a key source of information regarding the training of doctoral graduates in Canada. It provides information on the pathways of these highly qualified graduates through the education system and sheds light into the expectations of graduates as they transition into employment and postdoctoral education.

    In this 2005/2006 report, special attention has been given to the foreign born among the doctoral graduates. Foreign-born graduates represent more than one in every five graduates in the 2005/2006 academic year, and over half of all doctoral graduates living in Canada in 2006. Canada's immigration policy, with its emphasis on educational attainment, ensures that the foreign born will continue to account for a large proportion of Canada's doctorate degree holders. Furthermore, attracting foreign-born talent to Canada will be important if Canada is to increase the number of doctoral degree holders, since growth in the graduates from Canadian institutions has been minimal. One of the key challenges will be to retain graduates, both foreign-born and Canadian-born, in Canada upon the completion of their degree.

    Also unique to this third report, is the ability to discuss trends over the three years of survey data.

    Release date: 2008-10-17

  • Stats in brief: 56-001-X200800110653
    Description:

    This publication presents financial and operating statistics for telecommunications services industries, except the Cable and Other Program Distribution industry.

    Release date: 2008-09-02

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X200800210604
    Description:

    Data on science and technology (S&T) expenditures and full-time equivalent personnel allocated to biotechnology for fiscal year 2006/2007 were collected from selected federal government departments and agencies.The biotechnology S&T data comprise expenditures on research and development (R&D) and related scientific activities (RSA) for both intramural and extramural performers and the full-time equivalent personnel associated with these activities.

    Release date: 2008-06-02

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800110588
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 2006, a question on Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tags was introduced on the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology. RFID tags are currently used by organizations for a wide variety of purposes. The concept of RFID tags combines radio frequencies and bar code systems, giving mobility to logistics. The data on RFID tag usage in Canada show the application of this technology is in its infancy. The small number of organizations that use RFID tags can be explained by the newness of the technology and the potentially high costs of investment and implementation. Despite the initial costs, organizations that use RFID benefit in the longer run.

    Release date: 2008-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800110598
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    After working for more than 20 years on behalf of science and technology statistics, Dr. Frederic Gault, Director, Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division, is leaving Statistics Canada.

    Release date: 2008-05-22

  • Journals and periodicals: 63F0002X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Analytical paper series contains research published by Service Industries Division, sometimes in collaboration with other parts of Statistics Canada, government departments, research institutes, businesses and academics. All papers in the Series pertain to individual service industries or to the services sector as a whole. The objective of the Series is to disseminate knowledge and stimulate discussion. Readers are encouraged to contact the authors with comments, criticisms and suggestions.

    Release date: 2008-02-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2008018
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the presence of knowledge spillovers that affect the adoption of advanced technologies in the Canadian manufacturing sector. It examines whether plants that adopt advanced technologies are more likely to do so when there are other nearby plants that do so within a model of technology adoption.

    Release date: 2008-02-05
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