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  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X20010127904
    Description:

    This service bulletin presents the geographic distribution of federal government science and technology expenditures. Data on federal government expenditures on science and technology are found in Volume 25 No. 9 of this publication series, released in November 2001. In both this and the earlier bulletin, science and technology (S&T) expenditures are the sum of expenditures on research and development (R&D) and on related scientific activities (RSA).

    Release date: 2001-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20010026041
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article focusses on trends in radio listening, with an emphasis on fall 2000.

    Release date: 2001-12-19

  • Journals and periodicals: 56-506-X
    Description:

    Information and communications technologies in Canada is designed to profile the growth and development of the Canadian information and communications technologies (ICT) sector. The publication provides a statistical overview of the ICT sector on the basis of key economic variables, including production, employment, international trade, revenue and research and development expenditures.

    Statistics Canada's first quantification of the ICT sector appeared in the compendium publication entitled Networked Canada: beyond the information highway, catalogue no. 56-504-XIE. This publication updates these estimates with the most recent data, while providing improved industrial coverage and in-depth analysis of Canada's ICT sector.

    Many different data sources have been used throughout the project, and while all efforts have been made to maximize the amount of data available, it has not been possible in all instances to consistently report for all ICT industries and all relevant variables. The conversion to the new North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) has largely contributed to these difficulties, and it is expected that a greater range of data will be available once all of the survey programs begin reporting on the basis of this new industry classification.

    Release date: 2001-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20010036003
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines access to and use of the Internet by young Canadians aged 15 to 24. It explores their motivations and their concerns about security and privacy.

    Release date: 2001-12-11

  • 5. Older surfers Archived
    Articles and reports: 11-008-X20010036004
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study explores Internet use among Canadians aged 60 and over, specifically, why and how they use it, and how they developed their computer skills. It also examines barriers to use.

    Release date: 2001-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20010036005
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The article investigates whether Internet users spend less time with other people or on other activities.

    Release date: 2001-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20010035967
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 1997, 41% of engineering services firms identified themselves as innovators, but only 4% of them had introduced breakthrough products or processes that had the potential of putting these firms in the role of global leaders. There's more than meets the eye in interpreting the myriad of indicators describing the "system of innovation".

    Release date: 2001-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20010035971
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Biotechnology firms are generally flexible and innovative in their approaches to survival and growth in Canada and also on the world stage. Read an overview of some of the business strategies and practices used by biotechnology firms to conduct research and development and for some, commercialization of their products.

    Release date: 2001-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 87-403-X20010015904
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The phenomenon of consolidation, characterized by mergers, acquisitions and alliances, is an excellent means of responding to globalization, and constitutes an increasingly common way for companies to position themselves on the global chessboard.

    Release date: 2001-10-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001174
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper investigates the evolution of the industrial structure in the Canadian manufacturing sector and its relationship to technological change by examining the take-up of advanced technologies and how it is related to the stochastic growth process in the plant population. Its framework is grounded in the view that growth is a stochastic process that involves learning. Experimentation with new technologies rewards some firms with superior growth and profitability. Examining how growth is associated with the choice of different technology strategies indicates which of these is being rewarded.

    The evolution of this process is studied by examining the relationship between the uptake of advanced technologies and the performance of plants in the manufacturing sector. This is done by using cross-sectional data on advanced technology use and by combining it with longitudinal panel data on plant performance. In particular, the paper examines the relationship between the use of information and communications technology (ICT) and the growth in a plant's market share and its relative productivity.

    The study finds that a considerable amount of market share is transferred from declining firms to growing firms over a decade. At the same time, the growers increase their productivity relative to the losers. Those technology users that were using communications technologies or that combined technologies from different classes increased their relative productivity the most. In turn, gains in relative productivity were accompanied by gains in market share. Other factors that were associated with gains in market share were the presence of R&D facilities and other innovative activities.

    Release date: 2001-10-03
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Analysis (27)

Analysis (27) (0 to 10 of 27 results)

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X20010127904
    Description:

    This service bulletin presents the geographic distribution of federal government science and technology expenditures. Data on federal government expenditures on science and technology are found in Volume 25 No. 9 of this publication series, released in November 2001. In both this and the earlier bulletin, science and technology (S&T) expenditures are the sum of expenditures on research and development (R&D) and on related scientific activities (RSA).

    Release date: 2001-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20010026041
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article focusses on trends in radio listening, with an emphasis on fall 2000.

    Release date: 2001-12-19

  • Journals and periodicals: 56-506-X
    Description:

    Information and communications technologies in Canada is designed to profile the growth and development of the Canadian information and communications technologies (ICT) sector. The publication provides a statistical overview of the ICT sector on the basis of key economic variables, including production, employment, international trade, revenue and research and development expenditures.

    Statistics Canada's first quantification of the ICT sector appeared in the compendium publication entitled Networked Canada: beyond the information highway, catalogue no. 56-504-XIE. This publication updates these estimates with the most recent data, while providing improved industrial coverage and in-depth analysis of Canada's ICT sector.

    Many different data sources have been used throughout the project, and while all efforts have been made to maximize the amount of data available, it has not been possible in all instances to consistently report for all ICT industries and all relevant variables. The conversion to the new North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) has largely contributed to these difficulties, and it is expected that a greater range of data will be available once all of the survey programs begin reporting on the basis of this new industry classification.

    Release date: 2001-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20010036003
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines access to and use of the Internet by young Canadians aged 15 to 24. It explores their motivations and their concerns about security and privacy.

    Release date: 2001-12-11

  • 5. Older surfers Archived
    Articles and reports: 11-008-X20010036004
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study explores Internet use among Canadians aged 60 and over, specifically, why and how they use it, and how they developed their computer skills. It also examines barriers to use.

    Release date: 2001-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20010036005
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The article investigates whether Internet users spend less time with other people or on other activities.

    Release date: 2001-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20010035967
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 1997, 41% of engineering services firms identified themselves as innovators, but only 4% of them had introduced breakthrough products or processes that had the potential of putting these firms in the role of global leaders. There's more than meets the eye in interpreting the myriad of indicators describing the "system of innovation".

    Release date: 2001-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20010035971
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Biotechnology firms are generally flexible and innovative in their approaches to survival and growth in Canada and also on the world stage. Read an overview of some of the business strategies and practices used by biotechnology firms to conduct research and development and for some, commercialization of their products.

    Release date: 2001-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 87-403-X20010015904
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The phenomenon of consolidation, characterized by mergers, acquisitions and alliances, is an excellent means of responding to globalization, and constitutes an increasingly common way for companies to position themselves on the global chessboard.

    Release date: 2001-10-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001174
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper investigates the evolution of the industrial structure in the Canadian manufacturing sector and its relationship to technological change by examining the take-up of advanced technologies and how it is related to the stochastic growth process in the plant population. Its framework is grounded in the view that growth is a stochastic process that involves learning. Experimentation with new technologies rewards some firms with superior growth and profitability. Examining how growth is associated with the choice of different technology strategies indicates which of these is being rewarded.

    The evolution of this process is studied by examining the relationship between the uptake of advanced technologies and the performance of plants in the manufacturing sector. This is done by using cross-sectional data on advanced technology use and by combining it with longitudinal panel data on plant performance. In particular, the paper examines the relationship between the use of information and communications technology (ICT) and the growth in a plant's market share and its relative productivity.

    The study finds that a considerable amount of market share is transferred from declining firms to growing firms over a decade. At the same time, the growers increase their productivity relative to the losers. Those technology users that were using communications technologies or that combined technologies from different classes increased their relative productivity the most. In turn, gains in relative productivity were accompanied by gains in market share. Other factors that were associated with gains in market share were the presence of R&D facilities and other innovative activities.

    Release date: 2001-10-03
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-588-X
    Description:

    The Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) is a longitudinal survey designed to provide policy-relevant information about school-work transitions and factors influencing pathways. YITS will provide vehicle for future research and analysis of major transitions in young people's lives, particularly those between education, training and work. Information obtained from, and research based on, the survey will help clarify the nature and causes of short and long-term challenges young people face in school-work transitions and support policy planning and decision making to help prevent or remedy these problems.

    Objectives of the Youth in Transition Survey were developed after an extensive consultation with stakeholders with an interest in youth and school-work transitions. Content includes measurement of major transitions in young people's lives including virtually all formal educational experiences and most labour-market experiences. Factors influencing transitions are also included family background, school experiences, achievement, aspirations and expectations, and employment experiences.

    The implementation plan encompasses a longitudinal survey for each of two age cohorts, to be surveyed every two years. Data from a cohort entering at age 15 will permit analysis of long-term school-work transition patterns. Data from a cohort entering at ages18-20 will provide more immediate, policy-relevant information on young adults in the labour market.

    Cycle one for the cohort aged 15 will include information collected from youth, their parents, and school principals. The sample design is a school-based frame that allows the selection of schools, and then individuals within schools. This design will permit analysis of school effects, a research domain not currently addressed by other Statistics Canada surveys. Methods of data collection include a self-completed questionnaire for youth and school principals, a telephone interview with parents, and assessment of youth competency in reading, science and mathematics as using self-completed test booklets provided under the integration of YITS with the OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). A pilot survey was conducted in April 1999 and the main survey took place in April-May 2000. Interviews were conducted with 30,000 students aged 15 from 1,000 schools in Canada. A telephone interview with parents of selected students took place in June 2000.

    The sample design for the cohort aged 18-20 is similar to that of the Labour-Force survey. The method of data collection is computer-assisted telephone interviewing. The pilot survey was conducted in January 1999. In January-February 2000, 23, 000 youth participated in the main survey data collection.

    Data from both cohorts is expected to be available in 2001. Following release of the first international report by the OECD/PISA project and the first national report, data will be publically available, permitting detailed exploration of content themes.

    Release date: 2001-04-11
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