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All (11) (0 to 10 of 11 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2024003
    Description: This research paper examines shelter and transportation costs within census metropolitan areas (CMAs). The paper begins by describing a proposed methodology for delineating urban and suburban sub-regions within CMA Market Basket Measure (MBM) regions. It then presents new shelter and transportation costs based on the new delineations and assesses the extent to which differences in costs between urban and suburban sub-regions differ. The analysis concludes by examining how the new delineations would impact the estimation of poverty rates had they been implemented. This paper also provides an opportunity for the public and stakeholders to provide feedback and comments.
    Release date: 2024-02-15

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019086
    Description:

    Using 2016 Census data, this infographic describes the commuting patterns of workers in Toronto, Montréal and Vancouver.

    Release date: 2019-12-02

  • Articles and reports: 16-508-X2019001
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This fact sheet compares population density for the Toronto and Vancouver census metropolitan areas (CMAs) in 1971 and 2016. It includes maps showing changes in the extent and density of populated areas on the periphery of these areas, as well as changes in population density within previously settled areas.

    Release date: 2019-02-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900110824
    Description:

    In this article, we quantify and discuss the difference between the level of physical activity of residents of urban neighbourhoods compared to suburban neighbourhoods.

    Release date: 2009-04-02

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800210621
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    "Signs of crime," which criminologists often call incivility, range from evidence of drug dealing and drug use to garbage littering the neighbourhood. When these perceptions of incivility reach levels of being considered a problem by residents, they can disrupt the community as a whole and lead to feelings of insecurity. This article will examine perceptions of incivility problems within some of Canada's census metropolitan areas. Then, it will look at patterns of perceptions of incivility problems by neighbourhood types.

    Release date: 2008-07-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800110459
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In this article, we explore four possible approaches to the problem of differentiating between suburban neighbourhoods and central neighbourhoods in census metropolitan areas. The advantages and limits of the four approaches are discussed in detail. In the second part, we show, using census data and selected classification tools, how the various types of neighbourhoods differ in terms of population characteristics.

    Release date: 2008-01-22

  • Articles and reports: 89-613-M2006010
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This report paints a statistical portrait of socio-economic conditions in the Census Metropolitan Areas (CMAs) of Toronto, Montréal and Vancouver. It highlights trends in population growth, suburban growth, commuting, employment, unemployment, immigration, income and low-income and socio-economic conditions among immigrants, Aboriginal People, and others. It uses data from the 1981 to 2001 Censuses of Canada, the 2005 Labour Force Historical Review, and Income in Canada, 2004.

    Release date: 2006-07-20

  • 8. Getting to work Archived
    Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050038967
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In recent years, commuting patterns have become more complex as employment has grown more rapidly in the suburbs than in city core areas. Faced with few convenient public transit options, the increasing numbers of people who now commute cross-town to jobs in these suburbs overwhelmingly drive to work. This article examines commuting patterns between 1996 and 2001 as they relate to recent job growth in the suburbs. It briefly looks at the demographic characteristics of commuters and explores some of the implications that changing work locations and commute patterns have for infrastructure in Canadian cities.

    Release date: 2005-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 89-613-M2005007
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The report examined the location of jobs in 27 census metropolitan areas, paying particular attention to developments in Quebec, Montreal, Ottawa-Hull, Toronto, Winnipeg, Calgary, Edmonton and Vancouver. It also analysed the modes commuters used to travel to work, emphasising public transit and car (as driver or passenger) commute modes.

    While Canadian metropolitan areas continue to be characterized by a strong concentration of jobs in the downtown core, employment grew faster in the suburbs of Canada's largest metropolitan areas than in the city centres between 1996 and 2001. One characteristic of increasing employment in suburban locations is the shifting of manufacturing activities from the core of the city to the suburbs. Retail trade also shifted away from the central core towards more suburban locations. Relatively few workers employed outside the city centre commuted on public transit, rather, most drove or were a passenger in a car. This tendency to commute by car increased the farther the job was located from the city centre.

    Furthermore commute patterns have become more complex, with growth in suburb-to-suburb commutes outpacing traditional commute paths within the city centre, and between the city centre and suburbs. Commuters travelling from suburb to suburb were also much more likely to drive than take public transit.

    Despite the decentralization of jobs occurring in the metropolitan areas, public transit did not lose its share of commuters between 1996 and 2001. While more car traffic headed to jobs in the suburbs, a larger share of commuters heading for the city centre took public transit. This kept the total share of commuters who took public transit stable between 1996 and 2001.

    The report also found that jobs in the downtown core were higher skilled and higher paid, and that earnings increased faster for jobs in the city centre between 1996 and 2001.

    The report uses the 1996 and 2001 censuses of Canada.

    Release date: 2005-06-01

  • Articles and reports: 11F0024M20040007452
    Description:

    The report examines income and low income in census metropolitan areas between 1980 and 2000. It examines the situation of families and the neighbourhoods they live in. It also examines the situation of recent immigrants, Aboriginal people and lone-parent family members.

    Median pre-tax income rose in virtually all Canadian census metropolitan areas (CMAs) over the 1980 to 2000 period. Incomes increased at both the top and bottom of the income distribution, but tended to rise faster at the top. In nearly all cities, income increased faster in the higher income neighbourhoods - measured at the census tract (CT) level - than it did in lower income neighbourhoods. The incidence of low income was at similar levels in 1980 and 2000, but the demographic composition of low income changed, reflecting rising low-income rates among some 'at-risk' groups, as well as demographic changes in the CMA. By 2000, recent immigrants comprised more of the low-income population, and a greater share of the residents in low-income neighbourhoods than they did in 1980. Recent immigrants had much higher low-income rates in 2000 than in 1980. In 2000, Aboriginal people and people in single-parent families had much higher low-income rates than others and were over-represented in low-income neighbourhoods. The share of income that low-income families received from government transfers rose over the period. The location of low-income neighbourhoods changed in some CMAs, reflecting a decline in low-income neighbourhoods in the city centre and a rise in low-income neighbourhoods in more suburban areas.

    The report examines before-tax income in CMAs using the 1981, 1986, 1991, 1996 and 2001 censuses of Canada.

    Release date: 2004-11-25
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Analysis (11)

Analysis (11) (0 to 10 of 11 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2024003
    Description: This research paper examines shelter and transportation costs within census metropolitan areas (CMAs). The paper begins by describing a proposed methodology for delineating urban and suburban sub-regions within CMA Market Basket Measure (MBM) regions. It then presents new shelter and transportation costs based on the new delineations and assesses the extent to which differences in costs between urban and suburban sub-regions differ. The analysis concludes by examining how the new delineations would impact the estimation of poverty rates had they been implemented. This paper also provides an opportunity for the public and stakeholders to provide feedback and comments.
    Release date: 2024-02-15

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019086
    Description:

    Using 2016 Census data, this infographic describes the commuting patterns of workers in Toronto, Montréal and Vancouver.

    Release date: 2019-12-02

  • Articles and reports: 16-508-X2019001
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This fact sheet compares population density for the Toronto and Vancouver census metropolitan areas (CMAs) in 1971 and 2016. It includes maps showing changes in the extent and density of populated areas on the periphery of these areas, as well as changes in population density within previously settled areas.

    Release date: 2019-02-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900110824
    Description:

    In this article, we quantify and discuss the difference between the level of physical activity of residents of urban neighbourhoods compared to suburban neighbourhoods.

    Release date: 2009-04-02

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800210621
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    "Signs of crime," which criminologists often call incivility, range from evidence of drug dealing and drug use to garbage littering the neighbourhood. When these perceptions of incivility reach levels of being considered a problem by residents, they can disrupt the community as a whole and lead to feelings of insecurity. This article will examine perceptions of incivility problems within some of Canada's census metropolitan areas. Then, it will look at patterns of perceptions of incivility problems by neighbourhood types.

    Release date: 2008-07-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800110459
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In this article, we explore four possible approaches to the problem of differentiating between suburban neighbourhoods and central neighbourhoods in census metropolitan areas. The advantages and limits of the four approaches are discussed in detail. In the second part, we show, using census data and selected classification tools, how the various types of neighbourhoods differ in terms of population characteristics.

    Release date: 2008-01-22

  • Articles and reports: 89-613-M2006010
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This report paints a statistical portrait of socio-economic conditions in the Census Metropolitan Areas (CMAs) of Toronto, Montréal and Vancouver. It highlights trends in population growth, suburban growth, commuting, employment, unemployment, immigration, income and low-income and socio-economic conditions among immigrants, Aboriginal People, and others. It uses data from the 1981 to 2001 Censuses of Canada, the 2005 Labour Force Historical Review, and Income in Canada, 2004.

    Release date: 2006-07-20

  • 8. Getting to work Archived
    Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050038967
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In recent years, commuting patterns have become more complex as employment has grown more rapidly in the suburbs than in city core areas. Faced with few convenient public transit options, the increasing numbers of people who now commute cross-town to jobs in these suburbs overwhelmingly drive to work. This article examines commuting patterns between 1996 and 2001 as they relate to recent job growth in the suburbs. It briefly looks at the demographic characteristics of commuters and explores some of the implications that changing work locations and commute patterns have for infrastructure in Canadian cities.

    Release date: 2005-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 89-613-M2005007
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The report examined the location of jobs in 27 census metropolitan areas, paying particular attention to developments in Quebec, Montreal, Ottawa-Hull, Toronto, Winnipeg, Calgary, Edmonton and Vancouver. It also analysed the modes commuters used to travel to work, emphasising public transit and car (as driver or passenger) commute modes.

    While Canadian metropolitan areas continue to be characterized by a strong concentration of jobs in the downtown core, employment grew faster in the suburbs of Canada's largest metropolitan areas than in the city centres between 1996 and 2001. One characteristic of increasing employment in suburban locations is the shifting of manufacturing activities from the core of the city to the suburbs. Retail trade also shifted away from the central core towards more suburban locations. Relatively few workers employed outside the city centre commuted on public transit, rather, most drove or were a passenger in a car. This tendency to commute by car increased the farther the job was located from the city centre.

    Furthermore commute patterns have become more complex, with growth in suburb-to-suburb commutes outpacing traditional commute paths within the city centre, and between the city centre and suburbs. Commuters travelling from suburb to suburb were also much more likely to drive than take public transit.

    Despite the decentralization of jobs occurring in the metropolitan areas, public transit did not lose its share of commuters between 1996 and 2001. While more car traffic headed to jobs in the suburbs, a larger share of commuters heading for the city centre took public transit. This kept the total share of commuters who took public transit stable between 1996 and 2001.

    The report also found that jobs in the downtown core were higher skilled and higher paid, and that earnings increased faster for jobs in the city centre between 1996 and 2001.

    The report uses the 1996 and 2001 censuses of Canada.

    Release date: 2005-06-01

  • Articles and reports: 11F0024M20040007452
    Description:

    The report examines income and low income in census metropolitan areas between 1980 and 2000. It examines the situation of families and the neighbourhoods they live in. It also examines the situation of recent immigrants, Aboriginal people and lone-parent family members.

    Median pre-tax income rose in virtually all Canadian census metropolitan areas (CMAs) over the 1980 to 2000 period. Incomes increased at both the top and bottom of the income distribution, but tended to rise faster at the top. In nearly all cities, income increased faster in the higher income neighbourhoods - measured at the census tract (CT) level - than it did in lower income neighbourhoods. The incidence of low income was at similar levels in 1980 and 2000, but the demographic composition of low income changed, reflecting rising low-income rates among some 'at-risk' groups, as well as demographic changes in the CMA. By 2000, recent immigrants comprised more of the low-income population, and a greater share of the residents in low-income neighbourhoods than they did in 1980. Recent immigrants had much higher low-income rates in 2000 than in 1980. In 2000, Aboriginal people and people in single-parent families had much higher low-income rates than others and were over-represented in low-income neighbourhoods. The share of income that low-income families received from government transfers rose over the period. The location of low-income neighbourhoods changed in some CMAs, reflecting a decline in low-income neighbourhoods in the city centre and a rise in low-income neighbourhoods in more suburban areas.

    The report examines before-tax income in CMAs using the 1981, 1986, 1991, 1996 and 2001 censuses of Canada.

    Release date: 2004-11-25
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