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All (20) (0 to 10 of 20 results)

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2007054
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study 'maps' the various pathways that young people have taken from high school through to regular participation in the labour market. It links this transition to important background characteristics, in addition to highlighting the pathways that lead to successful transitions to employment.

    The study uses data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) for 2004. YITS is a longitudinal survey that first collected data from two age groups of youth in the first cycle of the survey in 2000. One group began its participation at age 15 (Cohort A) and the other at ages 18 to 20 (Cohort B); the focus of the analysis is on the second group. Both cohorts were asked to provide a range of information on their education and employment experiences as well as information on their personal characteristics including, for example, their educational aspirations.

    The first follow-up interview with the YITS participants took place in early 2002 when youth were interviewed for a second time. At that time, Cohort B participants were between the ages of 20 to 22. The second follow-up interview took place in 2004, for the reference period December 2003, when Cohort B participants were ages 22 to 24.

    This report builds on the basic pathway descriptions of non-students in December 2003 by first determining the major factors that help predict who follows which path. Following this, we turn our attention to studying how these pathways relate to 'success' in the labour market. Specifically, the report is organized as follows:

    Chapter 2 analyzes how background factors predict which school-to-labour market path young adults aged 22 to 24 passed through by December 2003; these background factors are for the most part static categories that do not change (for example, sex, age, ethnicity, parental education, etc.).

    Chapter 3 introduces various 'intervening' factors measured during high school (for example, grade-point average, working in high school, etc.). These factors are thought to be important for possibly mediating the effect of the prior background measures on predicting the school-to-work transitions.

    Chapter 4 shifts the focus of the analysis from looking at predictors of the school-to-work pathways to using the pathways as an indicator of labour market outcomes. In this chapter, we are able to determine whether certain paths are more or less successful for employment, as well as landing respondents 'good' jobs, defined in terms of earnings and level of job satisfaction. We are also able to determine in which occupation they worked during December 2003.

    Chapter 5, the concluding chapter, synthesizes the findings and analysis.

    Release date: 2007-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410713123
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study looks at the decision of parents to save, and amounts saved, for the future education of children aged under 19 years in 2002. A model is used to estimate cumulative parental savings, taking into consideration characteristics of the family and the child, aspirations and involvement of parents, awareness of saving incentive programs, and expectations about grant programs.

    Release date: 2004-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20010046385
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data from the Programme for International Student Assessment, this article examines issues relating to access and use of information and communications technology (ICT). The issues under study include: - the extent to which Canadian youth have access to and use ICT; - how access to and use of ICT by Canadian youth compares with that of children in other Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries; - the relationship of ICT access and use to a student's gender; - whether the child was born in Canada; - the province lived in; - the school attended; and - socio-economic status.

    Release date: 2002-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20000005750
    Geography: Canada
    Description: In the present research, our aims are to trace the emergence of the "blended family" (the term generally employed to describe stepfamilies with a common child), exploring which features of stepfamilies make them most susceptible to become blended families, and to assess how being born into a stepfamily affects the family experience and subsequent life course of the growing number of children involved.
    Release date: 2001-06-22

  • Public use microdata: 89M0015X
    Description:

    The National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY), developed jointly by Human Resources Development Canada and Statistics Canada, is a comprehensive survey which follows the development of children in Canada and paints a picture of their lives. The survey monitors children's development and measures the incidence of various factors that influence their development, both positively and negatively.

    Release date: 2001-05-30

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20000098382
    Geography: Province or territory, Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    The most recent police-reported statistics indicate that the crime rate in Canada has decreased for the eighth consecutive year and is at its lowest point since 1979. Statistics from the United States and from many other countries show similar trends. However, data from studies such as the 1993 General Social Survey (GSS), the 1996 International Criminal Victimization Survey (ICVS), and national polls suggest that many Canadians perceive crime as increasing and fear being a victim of crime in their neighbourhoods. The most feared crimes are those of a violent nature, especially homicide – the killing of one human being by another – which tends to receive more media attention than any other criminal act. Despite this concern among Canadians about violence, the homicide rate has been declining since the mid-1970s.

    Release date: 2000-10-18

  • Articles and reports: 85-224-X20000005257
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Mistreatment of children and youth is a complex issue that can have devastating consequences and not only the children and youth involved, but on society in general. However, there is no single source for national data on the nature and extent of child mistreatment in Canada.

    Release date: 2000-07-25

  • 8. Family homicide Archived
    Articles and reports: 85-224-X20000005259
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    From 1979 to 1998, there were 12,767 victims of homicide in Canada. One-third of the victims were killed by family members, another 36% were committed by acquaintances, and 12% by strangers.

    Release date: 2000-07-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990034785
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines the family circumstances of 8- to 11-year-old youngsters to assess the link between behaviour and certain family characteristics.

    Release date: 1999-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990108304
    Geography: Province or territory, Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    The most recent police-reported statistics indicate that the crime rate in Canada has decreased for the seventh consecutive year and is the lowest since 1979. Statistics from the United States and from many European countries show similar trends. However, data from studies such as the 1993 General Social Survey (GSS), the 1996 International Criminal Victimization Survey (ICVS), and national polls suggest that Canadians perceive crime as increasing and fear being a victim of crime in their neighbourhoods. The most feared crimes are those of a violent nature especially homicide – the killing of one human being by another - which tends to receive more media attention than any other criminal act. Despite this growing concern among Canadians about violence, the homicide rate has gradually been declining since the mid-1970s.

    Release date: 1999-10-07
Data (2)

Data (2) ((2 results))

  • Public use microdata: 89M0015X
    Description:

    The National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY), developed jointly by Human Resources Development Canada and Statistics Canada, is a comprehensive survey which follows the development of children in Canada and paints a picture of their lives. The survey monitors children's development and measures the incidence of various factors that influence their development, both positively and negatively.

    Release date: 2001-05-30

  • Public use microdata: 12M0010X
    Description:

    Cycle 10 collected data from persons 15 years and older and concentrated on the respondent's family. Topics covered include marital history, common- law unions, biological, adopted and step children, family origins, child leaving and fertility intentions.

    The target population of the GSS (General Social Survey) consisted of all individuals aged 15 and over living in a private household in one of the ten provinces.

    Release date: 1997-02-28
Analysis (18)

Analysis (18) (0 to 10 of 18 results)

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2007054
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study 'maps' the various pathways that young people have taken from high school through to regular participation in the labour market. It links this transition to important background characteristics, in addition to highlighting the pathways that lead to successful transitions to employment.

    The study uses data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) for 2004. YITS is a longitudinal survey that first collected data from two age groups of youth in the first cycle of the survey in 2000. One group began its participation at age 15 (Cohort A) and the other at ages 18 to 20 (Cohort B); the focus of the analysis is on the second group. Both cohorts were asked to provide a range of information on their education and employment experiences as well as information on their personal characteristics including, for example, their educational aspirations.

    The first follow-up interview with the YITS participants took place in early 2002 when youth were interviewed for a second time. At that time, Cohort B participants were between the ages of 20 to 22. The second follow-up interview took place in 2004, for the reference period December 2003, when Cohort B participants were ages 22 to 24.

    This report builds on the basic pathway descriptions of non-students in December 2003 by first determining the major factors that help predict who follows which path. Following this, we turn our attention to studying how these pathways relate to 'success' in the labour market. Specifically, the report is organized as follows:

    Chapter 2 analyzes how background factors predict which school-to-labour market path young adults aged 22 to 24 passed through by December 2003; these background factors are for the most part static categories that do not change (for example, sex, age, ethnicity, parental education, etc.).

    Chapter 3 introduces various 'intervening' factors measured during high school (for example, grade-point average, working in high school, etc.). These factors are thought to be important for possibly mediating the effect of the prior background measures on predicting the school-to-work transitions.

    Chapter 4 shifts the focus of the analysis from looking at predictors of the school-to-work pathways to using the pathways as an indicator of labour market outcomes. In this chapter, we are able to determine whether certain paths are more or less successful for employment, as well as landing respondents 'good' jobs, defined in terms of earnings and level of job satisfaction. We are also able to determine in which occupation they worked during December 2003.

    Chapter 5, the concluding chapter, synthesizes the findings and analysis.

    Release date: 2007-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410713123
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study looks at the decision of parents to save, and amounts saved, for the future education of children aged under 19 years in 2002. A model is used to estimate cumulative parental savings, taking into consideration characteristics of the family and the child, aspirations and involvement of parents, awareness of saving incentive programs, and expectations about grant programs.

    Release date: 2004-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20010046385
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data from the Programme for International Student Assessment, this article examines issues relating to access and use of information and communications technology (ICT). The issues under study include: - the extent to which Canadian youth have access to and use ICT; - how access to and use of ICT by Canadian youth compares with that of children in other Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries; - the relationship of ICT access and use to a student's gender; - whether the child was born in Canada; - the province lived in; - the school attended; and - socio-economic status.

    Release date: 2002-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20000005750
    Geography: Canada
    Description: In the present research, our aims are to trace the emergence of the "blended family" (the term generally employed to describe stepfamilies with a common child), exploring which features of stepfamilies make them most susceptible to become blended families, and to assess how being born into a stepfamily affects the family experience and subsequent life course of the growing number of children involved.
    Release date: 2001-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20000098382
    Geography: Province or territory, Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    The most recent police-reported statistics indicate that the crime rate in Canada has decreased for the eighth consecutive year and is at its lowest point since 1979. Statistics from the United States and from many other countries show similar trends. However, data from studies such as the 1993 General Social Survey (GSS), the 1996 International Criminal Victimization Survey (ICVS), and national polls suggest that many Canadians perceive crime as increasing and fear being a victim of crime in their neighbourhoods. The most feared crimes are those of a violent nature, especially homicide – the killing of one human being by another – which tends to receive more media attention than any other criminal act. Despite this concern among Canadians about violence, the homicide rate has been declining since the mid-1970s.

    Release date: 2000-10-18

  • Articles and reports: 85-224-X20000005257
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Mistreatment of children and youth is a complex issue that can have devastating consequences and not only the children and youth involved, but on society in general. However, there is no single source for national data on the nature and extent of child mistreatment in Canada.

    Release date: 2000-07-25

  • 7. Family homicide Archived
    Articles and reports: 85-224-X20000005259
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    From 1979 to 1998, there were 12,767 victims of homicide in Canada. One-third of the victims were killed by family members, another 36% were committed by acquaintances, and 12% by strangers.

    Release date: 2000-07-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990034785
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines the family circumstances of 8- to 11-year-old youngsters to assess the link between behaviour and certain family characteristics.

    Release date: 1999-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990108304
    Geography: Province or territory, Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    The most recent police-reported statistics indicate that the crime rate in Canada has decreased for the seventh consecutive year and is the lowest since 1979. Statistics from the United States and from many European countries show similar trends. However, data from studies such as the 1993 General Social Survey (GSS), the 1996 International Criminal Victimization Survey (ICVS), and national polls suggest that Canadians perceive crime as increasing and fear being a victim of crime in their neighbourhoods. The most feared crimes are those of a violent nature especially homicide – the killing of one human being by another - which tends to receive more media attention than any other criminal act. Despite this growing concern among Canadians about violence, the homicide rate has gradually been declining since the mid-1970s.

    Release date: 1999-10-07

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990024661
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article looks at the people who are providing care to seniors with a long-term health problem, the factors that influence the amount of time they devote to eldercare and the types of hardships they experience as a result of helping.

    Release date: 1999-09-09
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