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  • Articles and reports: 89-613-M2005009
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The "Trends and Conditions in Census Metropolitan Areas" series of reports provides key background information on Canadian census metropolitan areas (CMAs) for the period 1981 to 2001. Based primarily on census data, this series provides substantial information and analysis on several topics: low income, health, immigration, culture, housing, labour markets, industrial structure, mobility, public transit and commuting, and Aboriginal people. This final assessment summarizes the major findings of the eight reports and evaluates what has been learned. It points out that the series has three key contributions. First, it details how place matters. Census metropolitan areas differ greatly in many indicators, and their economic and social differences are important factors that define them. Accordingly, policy prescriptions affecting cities may need to reflect this diversity. Second, the series contributes substantially to the amount of data and analysis needed to make accurate policy assessments of what may be ailing in Canada's largest cities and where each problem is most acute. Third, it provides benchmarks against which future data 'most notably data from the 2006 Census' can be examined. This summary also briefly discusses some subjects which were not covered in the series, identifying these as data gaps, or areas where more research is needed.

    Release date: 2005-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040047777
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Self-employment is more common in rural than urban Canada. In 2001, about one in four workers in rural areas, villages and small towns earned at least some of their income from self-employment, compared with only one in six in Canada as a whole. Of course, farming is a key element explaining high self-employment rates in rural and small town Canada. But although farm self-employment remains a key source of income and employment for many, its importance has declined and self-employment activity on the non-farm side has been increasing rapidly.

    The forces driving self-employment in smaller labour markets may be complex, but there is no doubt that entrepreneurship is thriving in rural Canada, despite the waning importance of farm self-employment. This article uses data from the Census of Population to describe non-farm self-employment among workers aged 20 to 64 living in Canada's rural areas and small towns.

    Release date: 2005-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 16-001-M2004001
    Description:

    The collection of firms producing environmental goods and delivering environmental services constitutes the 'environment industry.' This industry has grown significantly in the past 20 years and stands to continue this development in the future as emerging issues such as the level of greenhouse gas emissions are addressed.

    An important aspect in the evaluation of the industry's performance is in the area of job creation and employment generation. Related to the challenges involved in classifying firms to the environment industry is the issue of identifying the employees who work in environment-related activities. Currently, the published data on employment include only the total employment of those businesses producing environmental goods and services, i.e., employees who worked in the production/provision of goods and services that have both environmental and non-environmental applications.

    Release date: 2004-04-06

  • Table: 71-001-P
    Description:

    This publication provides the most current monthly labour market statistics. Each month, this publication contains a brief commentary highlighting recent developments in the Canadian labour market. It also includes a series of charts and tables on a variety of labour force characteristics, such as employment and unemployment for Canada, the provinces, metropolitan areas and economic regions.

    Release date: 2002-08-09

  • Stats in brief: 75-001-X200310813096
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper provides an update to the fact-sheet on unionization for 2003.

    Release date: 2001-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19980044420
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article explores the labour market experiences of recent immigrants in the 25- to 44-year age group from 1986 to 1996.

    Release date: 1999-03-11

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M1998014
    Description:

    This paper compares hours worked obtained from two different surveys: the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) and the Labour Force Survey (LFS) in order to evaluate the quality of the data from each survey.

    Release date: 1998-12-30

  • Classification: 12-565-X
    Description:

    The Standard Occupational Classification provides a systematic classification structure to identify and categorize the entire range of occupational activity in Canada. This up-to-date classification is based upon, and easily related to, the National Occupational Classification. It consists of 10 broad occupational categories which are subdivided into major groups, minor groups and unit groups. Definitions and occupational titles are provided for each unit group. An alphabetical index of the occupational titles classified to the unit group level is also included.

    Release date: 1993-08-23
Data (2)

Data (2) ((2 results))

Analysis (6)

Analysis (6) ((6 results))

  • Articles and reports: 89-613-M2005009
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The "Trends and Conditions in Census Metropolitan Areas" series of reports provides key background information on Canadian census metropolitan areas (CMAs) for the period 1981 to 2001. Based primarily on census data, this series provides substantial information and analysis on several topics: low income, health, immigration, culture, housing, labour markets, industrial structure, mobility, public transit and commuting, and Aboriginal people. This final assessment summarizes the major findings of the eight reports and evaluates what has been learned. It points out that the series has three key contributions. First, it details how place matters. Census metropolitan areas differ greatly in many indicators, and their economic and social differences are important factors that define them. Accordingly, policy prescriptions affecting cities may need to reflect this diversity. Second, the series contributes substantially to the amount of data and analysis needed to make accurate policy assessments of what may be ailing in Canada's largest cities and where each problem is most acute. Third, it provides benchmarks against which future data 'most notably data from the 2006 Census' can be examined. This summary also briefly discusses some subjects which were not covered in the series, identifying these as data gaps, or areas where more research is needed.

    Release date: 2005-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040047777
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Self-employment is more common in rural than urban Canada. In 2001, about one in four workers in rural areas, villages and small towns earned at least some of their income from self-employment, compared with only one in six in Canada as a whole. Of course, farming is a key element explaining high self-employment rates in rural and small town Canada. But although farm self-employment remains a key source of income and employment for many, its importance has declined and self-employment activity on the non-farm side has been increasing rapidly.

    The forces driving self-employment in smaller labour markets may be complex, but there is no doubt that entrepreneurship is thriving in rural Canada, despite the waning importance of farm self-employment. This article uses data from the Census of Population to describe non-farm self-employment among workers aged 20 to 64 living in Canada's rural areas and small towns.

    Release date: 2005-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 16-001-M2004001
    Description:

    The collection of firms producing environmental goods and delivering environmental services constitutes the 'environment industry.' This industry has grown significantly in the past 20 years and stands to continue this development in the future as emerging issues such as the level of greenhouse gas emissions are addressed.

    An important aspect in the evaluation of the industry's performance is in the area of job creation and employment generation. Related to the challenges involved in classifying firms to the environment industry is the issue of identifying the employees who work in environment-related activities. Currently, the published data on employment include only the total employment of those businesses producing environmental goods and services, i.e., employees who worked in the production/provision of goods and services that have both environmental and non-environmental applications.

    Release date: 2004-04-06

  • Stats in brief: 75-001-X200310813096
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper provides an update to the fact-sheet on unionization for 2003.

    Release date: 2001-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19980044420
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article explores the labour market experiences of recent immigrants in the 25- to 44-year age group from 1986 to 1996.

    Release date: 1999-03-11

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M1998014
    Description:

    This paper compares hours worked obtained from two different surveys: the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) and the Labour Force Survey (LFS) in order to evaluate the quality of the data from each survey.

    Release date: 1998-12-30
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Classification: 12-565-X
    Description:

    The Standard Occupational Classification provides a systematic classification structure to identify and categorize the entire range of occupational activity in Canada. This up-to-date classification is based upon, and easily related to, the National Occupational Classification. It consists of 10 broad occupational categories which are subdivided into major groups, minor groups and unit groups. Definitions and occupational titles are provided for each unit group. An alphabetical index of the occupational titles classified to the unit group level is also included.

    Release date: 1993-08-23
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