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All (4) ((4 results))

  • Table: 12-581-X
    Description:

    Canada at a Glance presents current statistics on Canadian demography, education, health and aging, justice, housing, income, labour market, household, economy, travel, finance, agriculture, foreign trade and environment. This booklet also includes important international comparisons, so that readers can see how Canada stacks up against its neighbours. Updated yearly, Canada at a Glance is a very useful reference for those who want quick access to current Canadian statistics.

    Release date: 2019-06-24

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-630-X
    Description:

    In 2018, Statistics Canada will celebrate its 100th anniversary. As we count down to this important milestone, we would like to use our data to highlight some of the sweeping changes that have had a lasting impact on Canadian society and economy.

    Release date: 2018-02-21

  • Articles and reports: 91F0015M2007008
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    If low fertility, aging, demographic growth and ethnocultural diversity are phenomena that accurately describe Canada overall, the same patterns may not necessarily hold true for urban and rural areas. The rhythm and sources of demographic growth have often been significantly different from one area to the next, which would suggest that the situation across Canada stems from the aggregation of different demographies, which are variable between types of regions.

    The objective of this study is to examine demographic differences between urban and rural areas in Canada by analyzing communities along a gradient ranging from the largest metropolitan regions to the most rural areas. Applying a geographic structure to Census data from 1971 to 2001 that maintains constant borders over time, the authors analyze population growth across eight types of urban and rural regions; as well as the contribution of immigration, fertility and internal migration to growth differentials; and the consequences of these observed demographic differences in terms of aging and ethnocultural diversity.

    The study finds that growth is concentrated in the most metropolitan areas in the country and in the rural areas on which they have a strong influence, and diminished as the degree of rurality increases. Internal migration between the different types of areas has largely contributed to this differential growth: the most urbanized areas-with the exception of Montréal, Toronto and Vancouver-underwent significant migratory gains as well as strong growth. This was also the case with the rural regions that had a strong metropolitan influence. The most rural regions experienced a weak demographic growth, in some cases a decline, despite having higher fertility than other regions. The strong growth in the three largest urban areas in Canada-Montréal, Toronto and Vancouver-is largely attributed to the high numbers of international immigrants who decided to settle there. The concentration of newcomers in these regions helped increase the gap between these three areas and the rest of the country in terms of ethnocultural diversity.

    Release date: 2007-04-26

  • 4. Older surfers Archived
    Articles and reports: 11-008-X20010036004
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study explores Internet use among Canadians aged 60 and over, specifically, why and how they use it, and how they developed their computer skills. It also examines barriers to use.

    Release date: 2001-12-11
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Table: 12-581-X
    Description:

    Canada at a Glance presents current statistics on Canadian demography, education, health and aging, justice, housing, income, labour market, household, economy, travel, finance, agriculture, foreign trade and environment. This booklet also includes important international comparisons, so that readers can see how Canada stacks up against its neighbours. Updated yearly, Canada at a Glance is a very useful reference for those who want quick access to current Canadian statistics.

    Release date: 2019-06-24
Analysis (3)

Analysis (3) ((3 results))

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-630-X
    Description:

    In 2018, Statistics Canada will celebrate its 100th anniversary. As we count down to this important milestone, we would like to use our data to highlight some of the sweeping changes that have had a lasting impact on Canadian society and economy.

    Release date: 2018-02-21

  • Articles and reports: 91F0015M2007008
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    If low fertility, aging, demographic growth and ethnocultural diversity are phenomena that accurately describe Canada overall, the same patterns may not necessarily hold true for urban and rural areas. The rhythm and sources of demographic growth have often been significantly different from one area to the next, which would suggest that the situation across Canada stems from the aggregation of different demographies, which are variable between types of regions.

    The objective of this study is to examine demographic differences between urban and rural areas in Canada by analyzing communities along a gradient ranging from the largest metropolitan regions to the most rural areas. Applying a geographic structure to Census data from 1971 to 2001 that maintains constant borders over time, the authors analyze population growth across eight types of urban and rural regions; as well as the contribution of immigration, fertility and internal migration to growth differentials; and the consequences of these observed demographic differences in terms of aging and ethnocultural diversity.

    The study finds that growth is concentrated in the most metropolitan areas in the country and in the rural areas on which they have a strong influence, and diminished as the degree of rurality increases. Internal migration between the different types of areas has largely contributed to this differential growth: the most urbanized areas-with the exception of Montréal, Toronto and Vancouver-underwent significant migratory gains as well as strong growth. This was also the case with the rural regions that had a strong metropolitan influence. The most rural regions experienced a weak demographic growth, in some cases a decline, despite having higher fertility than other regions. The strong growth in the three largest urban areas in Canada-Montréal, Toronto and Vancouver-is largely attributed to the high numbers of international immigrants who decided to settle there. The concentration of newcomers in these regions helped increase the gap between these three areas and the rest of the country in terms of ethnocultural diversity.

    Release date: 2007-04-26

  • 3. Older surfers Archived
    Articles and reports: 11-008-X20010036004
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study explores Internet use among Canadians aged 60 and over, specifically, why and how they use it, and how they developed their computer skills. It also examines barriers to use.

    Release date: 2001-12-11
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