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  • Articles and reports: 89-652-X2014001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The article examines parenting and child support after separation or divorce, looking at those who have separated or divorced within the last 20 years. Included is a national and regional overview of separated or divorced parents, as well as an examination of parenting decisions in the wake of a marital or common-law breakup (child residency, time-sharing, and decision-making) and financial support arrangements for the child.

    Release date: 2014-02-12

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201300311774
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study compares trajectories of psychological distress among a nationally representative sample of Canadians aged 18 to 74 who did and did not experience parental addiction in childhood.

    Release date: 2013-03-20

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201100111404
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study assesses three child-reported parenting behaviour scales (nurturance, rejection and monitoring) in the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth.

    Release date: 2011-02-16

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2010019
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This study examines the relationship between parental monitoring and youth violent delinquency, as well as the extent to which this relationship may be influenced by the school context. The study is based on data from the International Youth Survey (2006) which gathered information from a sample of students in grades 7, 8 and 9 attending Toronto schools. Findings indicate that a low level of parental monitoring is associated with a higher likelihood of youth violent delinquency, and this effect is stronger when youth attend schools where the prevalence of delinquency among the student population is high. This finding supports the hypothesis that the negative influence of low parental monitoring is magnified when youth are also exposed to a pool of delinquent peers, and further suggests that the effectiveness of particular parenting strategies may vary depending on the environments to which youth are exposed.

    Release date: 2010-01-12

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900410931
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Based on information available from the 2006 General Social Survey on families, this article will explore the nature of time children spend with their separated or divorced parents. Issues to be explored will include: the type of visitation/access arrangements; the length of time spent with each parent; whether the time involves leisure activities, regular care (school, daycare, social) and decision-making activities; and whether parents are satisfied with the arrangements they have for visitation/access.

    Release date: 2009-10-28

  • Stats in brief: 89-634-X200800410724
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and 2006 Census. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the topics of family (persons involved in raising children, size of families, age of parents, adoption, living with grandparents), housing conditions (crowding, dwellings in need of major repairs, levels of satisfaction with housing conditions), feelings about community (facilities), and cultural activities (participation in traditional activities, having someone to help the child understand Inuit history and culture, cultural activities in child care). Results are presented for all Inuit children. Some results are also presented for those in Inuit Nunaat (meaning Inuit homeland): Nunatsiavut in northern Labrador, the territory of Nunavut, Nunavik in northern Quebec, and the Inuvialuit Settlement Region in the Northwest Territories.

    Release date: 2008-11-18

  • 7. Métis ChildrenArchived
    Stats in brief: 89-634-X2008002
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and 2006 Census. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the topics of family (persons involved in raising children, size of families, age of parents, lone parent families), socio-economic status (low-income economic families), feelings about community (as a place to raise children), and cultural activities (participation in traditional activities, having someone to help the child understand Métis history and culture, cultural activities in child care) for Métis children under six years of age.

    Release date: 2008-11-18

  • 8. Inuit ChildrenArchived
    Stats in brief: 89-634-X2008004
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and 2006 Census. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the topics of family (persons involved in raising children, size of families, age of parents, adoption, living with grandparents), housing conditions (crowding, dwellings in need of major repairs, levels of satisfaction with housing conditions), feelings about community (facilities), and cultural activities (participation in traditional activities, having someone to help the child understand Inuit history and culture, cultural activities in child care). Results are presented for all Inuit children. Some results are also presented for those in Inuit Nunaat (meaning Inuit homeland): Nunatsiavut in northern Labrador, the territory of Nunavut, Nunavik in northern Quebec, and the Inuvialuit Settlement Region in the Northwest Territories.

    Release date: 2008-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2008317
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study estimates the effect of an additional year of schooling (Grade 10) on academic performance, with the particular aim of understanding the role of schooling in shaping the gender and income divides in academic performance. To identify the returns to schooling, the study takes advantage of a setting whereby standardized tests were administered to large samples of students of very close age, but who were in different school grades as a result of school-entry laws, thus creating a sharp discontinuity in school grades. The findings suggest that one additional year of high school (Grade 10) is associated with a large improvement in overall reading and mathematics performance, and that it had a smaller improvement in science performance. However, the improvements are not equally distributed: mathematics scores improve more for boys than for girls, and reading and science scores improve more for lower than for higher income youth. Most importantly, we find no evidence that girls or higher income youth benefit more from an additional year of high school in any test area. These findings suggest that the key to understanding the weaker academic performance of boys and lower income youth may lie in earlier school years, the home or at birth.

    Release date: 2008-11-07

  • Articles and reports: 89-599-M2008005
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) to examine the relationship between late childbearing (at or after age 35) among first-time mothers in Canada and three facets of development: physical health, behaviour and cognitive development. The following research questions were addressed: do the developmental characteristics of children born to older mothers differ from those of children born to younger mothers? And do other factors, such as demographic characteristics and parenting practices, account for differences in child development by maternal age at birth? For this analysis, first-born children were identified from among all interviewed children whose year of birth was between 1998 and 2005.

    Release date: 2008-09-24
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Analysis (17)

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  • Articles and reports: 89-652-X2014001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The article examines parenting and child support after separation or divorce, looking at those who have separated or divorced within the last 20 years. Included is a national and regional overview of separated or divorced parents, as well as an examination of parenting decisions in the wake of a marital or common-law breakup (child residency, time-sharing, and decision-making) and financial support arrangements for the child.

    Release date: 2014-02-12

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201300311774
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study compares trajectories of psychological distress among a nationally representative sample of Canadians aged 18 to 74 who did and did not experience parental addiction in childhood.

    Release date: 2013-03-20

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201100111404
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study assesses three child-reported parenting behaviour scales (nurturance, rejection and monitoring) in the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth.

    Release date: 2011-02-16

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2010019
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This study examines the relationship between parental monitoring and youth violent delinquency, as well as the extent to which this relationship may be influenced by the school context. The study is based on data from the International Youth Survey (2006) which gathered information from a sample of students in grades 7, 8 and 9 attending Toronto schools. Findings indicate that a low level of parental monitoring is associated with a higher likelihood of youth violent delinquency, and this effect is stronger when youth attend schools where the prevalence of delinquency among the student population is high. This finding supports the hypothesis that the negative influence of low parental monitoring is magnified when youth are also exposed to a pool of delinquent peers, and further suggests that the effectiveness of particular parenting strategies may vary depending on the environments to which youth are exposed.

    Release date: 2010-01-12

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900410931
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Based on information available from the 2006 General Social Survey on families, this article will explore the nature of time children spend with their separated or divorced parents. Issues to be explored will include: the type of visitation/access arrangements; the length of time spent with each parent; whether the time involves leisure activities, regular care (school, daycare, social) and decision-making activities; and whether parents are satisfied with the arrangements they have for visitation/access.

    Release date: 2009-10-28

  • Stats in brief: 89-634-X200800410724
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and 2006 Census. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the topics of family (persons involved in raising children, size of families, age of parents, adoption, living with grandparents), housing conditions (crowding, dwellings in need of major repairs, levels of satisfaction with housing conditions), feelings about community (facilities), and cultural activities (participation in traditional activities, having someone to help the child understand Inuit history and culture, cultural activities in child care). Results are presented for all Inuit children. Some results are also presented for those in Inuit Nunaat (meaning Inuit homeland): Nunatsiavut in northern Labrador, the territory of Nunavut, Nunavik in northern Quebec, and the Inuvialuit Settlement Region in the Northwest Territories.

    Release date: 2008-11-18

  • 7. Métis ChildrenArchived
    Stats in brief: 89-634-X2008002
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and 2006 Census. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the topics of family (persons involved in raising children, size of families, age of parents, lone parent families), socio-economic status (low-income economic families), feelings about community (as a place to raise children), and cultural activities (participation in traditional activities, having someone to help the child understand Métis history and culture, cultural activities in child care) for Métis children under six years of age.

    Release date: 2008-11-18

  • 8. Inuit ChildrenArchived
    Stats in brief: 89-634-X2008004
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and 2006 Census. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the topics of family (persons involved in raising children, size of families, age of parents, adoption, living with grandparents), housing conditions (crowding, dwellings in need of major repairs, levels of satisfaction with housing conditions), feelings about community (facilities), and cultural activities (participation in traditional activities, having someone to help the child understand Inuit history and culture, cultural activities in child care). Results are presented for all Inuit children. Some results are also presented for those in Inuit Nunaat (meaning Inuit homeland): Nunatsiavut in northern Labrador, the territory of Nunavut, Nunavik in northern Quebec, and the Inuvialuit Settlement Region in the Northwest Territories.

    Release date: 2008-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2008317
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study estimates the effect of an additional year of schooling (Grade 10) on academic performance, with the particular aim of understanding the role of schooling in shaping the gender and income divides in academic performance. To identify the returns to schooling, the study takes advantage of a setting whereby standardized tests were administered to large samples of students of very close age, but who were in different school grades as a result of school-entry laws, thus creating a sharp discontinuity in school grades. The findings suggest that one additional year of high school (Grade 10) is associated with a large improvement in overall reading and mathematics performance, and that it had a smaller improvement in science performance. However, the improvements are not equally distributed: mathematics scores improve more for boys than for girls, and reading and science scores improve more for lower than for higher income youth. Most importantly, we find no evidence that girls or higher income youth benefit more from an additional year of high school in any test area. These findings suggest that the key to understanding the weaker academic performance of boys and lower income youth may lie in earlier school years, the home or at birth.

    Release date: 2008-11-07

  • Articles and reports: 89-599-M2008005
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) to examine the relationship between late childbearing (at or after age 35) among first-time mothers in Canada and three facets of development: physical health, behaviour and cognitive development. The following research questions were addressed: do the developmental characteristics of children born to older mothers differ from those of children born to younger mothers? And do other factors, such as demographic characteristics and parenting practices, account for differences in child development by maternal age at birth? For this analysis, first-born children were identified from among all interviewed children whose year of birth was between 1998 and 2005.

    Release date: 2008-09-24
Reference (2)

Reference (2) ((2 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89-631-X
    Description:

    This report highlights the latest developments and rationale behind recent cycles of the General Social Survey (GSS). Starting with an overview of the GSS mandate and historic cycle topics, we then focus on two recent cycles related to families in Canada: Family Transitions (2006) and Family, Social Support and Retirement (2007). Finally, we give a summary of what is to come in the 2008 GSS on Social Networks, and describe a special project to mark 'Twenty Years of GSS'.

    The survey collects data over a twelve month period from the population living in private households in the 10 provinces. For all cycles except Cycles 16 and 21, the population aged 15 and older has been sampled. Cycles 16 and 21 sampled persons aged 45 and older.

    Cycle 20 (GSS 2006) is the fourth cycle of the GSS to collect data on families (the first three cycles on the family were in 1990, 1995 and 2001). Cycle 20 covers much the same content as previous cycles on families with some sections revised and expanded. The data enable analysts to measure conjugal and fertility history (chronology of marriages, common-law unions, and children), family origins, children's home leaving, fertility intentions, child custody as well as work history and other socioeconomic characteristics. Questions on financial support agreements or arrangements (for children and the ex-spouse or ex-partner) for separated and divorced families have been modified. Also, sections on social networks, well-being and housing characteristics have been added.

    Release date: 2008-05-27

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X19980015032
    Description:

    The objective of this research project is to examine the long-term consequences of being raised in a single parent household. We examine the impact of parental separation or divorce on the adult labour market behaviour of children ten to fifteen years after the event. In particular, we relate the family income and household characteristics of a cohort of individuals who are 16 to 19 years of age in 1982 to their labour market earnings, reliance on social transfers (UI and Income Assistance), and marital/fertility outcomes during the early 1990s, when they are in their late 20s and early 30s. Our data is based upon the linked income tax records developed by us at Statistics Canada, the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, and the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth.

    Release date: 1999-10-22
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