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All (60)

All (60) (0 to 10 of 60 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2019012
    Description:

    This article examines neighbourhood satisfaction of Canadian households based on the results of the 2018 Canadian Housing Survey (CHS). The neighbourhood satisfaction level of the principal decision maker (the 'household reference person') is examined alongside satisfaction with selected neighbourhood items-such as neighbourhood disorder, safety and services-and socio-demographic and household characteristics.

    Release date: 2019-11-22

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201900900001
    Description:

    The purpose of this study is to examine how the association between walkability or an "activity friendly environment" and physical activity varies across the lifespan and by the various domains of physical activity in Canadians by combining the newly-developed Canadian Active Living Environments Database (Can-ALE) with two nationally-representative health surveys. Data are from the 2016 Can-ALE database, the Canadian Health Measures Survey (2009-2015), and the Canadian Community Health Survey (2015-2016).

    Release date: 2019-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201900900002
    Description:

    The purpose of this study is to examine the association between walkability and obesity and self-rated general and mental health in a nationally-representative sample of Canadians in children and adults. A secondary purpose is to examine and describe the mediating effect of physical activity in the association between walkability and obesity. Data are from the 2016 Canadian Active Living Environments database and the Canadian Health Measures Survey (2009-2015).

    Release date: 2019-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-657-X2016002
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This study examines the settlement patterns of the immigrant population as well as certain social integration components. It starts by outlining recent trends in the settlement patterns of the immigrant population in Canadian census metropolitan areas, namely Toronto, Montréal and Vancouver. Based on data from the 2013 General Social Survey on Social Identity, it then looks at residence characteristics, such as type of municipality and concentration of immigrant population, according to four social integration components: personal network characteristics, relationships with neighbours, social participation and involvement in community activities, and sense of belonging.

    Release date: 2017-05-08

  • Articles and reports: 89-652-X2016002
    Description:

    This report examines Canadians’ perceptions of neighbourhood disorder. Based on data from the 2014 General Social Survey (GSS) on Victimization, an overview of perceptions of neighbourhood disorder is presented by type of disorder, by province, and by census metropolitan area (CMA). Differences by demographic characteristics are also explored. In addition, this article examines selected neighbourhood-level characteristics at the national level and for Canada’s eight largest CMAs.

    Release date: 2016-03-02

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201500714204
    Description:

    The objective of this study was to determine if the prevalence of overweight and obesity is associated with neighbourhood walkability. The analysis tested whether a dose-response relationship between the Street Smart Walk Score® and various measures of physical activity, overweight, and obesity existed in a large, population-based sample of adults in urban and suburban Ontario.

    Release date: 2015-07-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014357
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    An emerging area of subjective well-being (SWB) research is centered on the differences in the levels of SWB both across countries and among geographic regions within a country. The consideration of geographic differences would extend our knowledge about the determinants of SWB from "internal" factors of personality traits and individuals' socio-demographic characteristics to "external factors" embedded in individuals' environments. An issue with important theoretical and policy implications is whether the income of others in the same geographic area is associated with individuals' SWB. The association could be positive if people benefit from the improved resources, amenities, and social capital in high-income areas. The association could also be negative if people tend to emulate the lifestyles of their more affluent neighbours. Related empirical studies so far have not come to a consensus on this question.

    The present study attempts to contribute to this issue in two significant ways. First, this study examines whether the effect of the average income in a geographic area (locality income) on SWB is sensitive to the scale of geographic units. With a very large sample of survey respondents nested within three hierarchical levels of geographic areas, this study provides reliable estimates of the association of SWB with average incomes in immediate neighbourhoods (defined as "census dissemination areas"), local communities ("census tracts"), and municipalities ("census subdivisions"). Second, this study examines how the choice of control variables influences the estimated effect of locality income. By considering the effects of individual demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, self-evaluated general health, and area-level attributes in a sequential manner, it is possible to discuss the likely mechanisms through which locality income is related to individuals' SWB.

    Release date: 2014-02-20

  • Stats in brief: 99-014-X201100311861
    Description:

    These two short articles provide complementary analysis to the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS) analytical document on the composition of income in Canada. They focus on specific topics of interest. The first NHS in Brief is entitled Education and occupations of high-income Canadians, and the second, Persons living in low-income neighbourhoods.

    Release date: 2013-09-11

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2011022
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This study explores the spatial distribution of police-reported youth crime in Toronto. It examines how youth crime is geographically distributed in Toronto and endeavours to shed light on the links between police-reported youth crime and the neighbourhood characteristics that are most strongly associated with it. This report represents the second phase of the spatial analysis of police-reported crime data for Toronto which builds on the research paper, Neighbourhood Characteristics and the Distribution of Police-reported Crime in the City of Toronto.

    Release date: 2011-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201100111577
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This Juristat article presents information on perceptions of personal safety and crime as reported by Canadians aged 15 and over living in the ten provinces. Using data from the 2009 General Social Survey (GSS) on victimization, it analyses Canadians' satisfaction with their personal safety from crime while performing specific activities, at both the provincial and census metropolitan area levels. It also includes information on Canadians' perceptions of the level of crime and social disorder in their neighbourhoods.

    Release date: 2011-12-01
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Table: 85-554-X
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This report presents a brief overview of the information collected in Cycle 13 of the General Social Survey (GSS). Cycle 13 is the third cycle (following cycles 3 and 8) that collected information in 1999 on the nature and extent of criminal victimisation in Canada. Focus content for cycle 13 addressed two areas of emerging interest: public perception toward alternatives to imprisonment; and spousal violence and senior abuse. Other subjects common to all three cycles include perceptions of crime, police and courts; crime prevention precautions; accident and crime screening sections; and accident and crime incident reports. The target population of the GSS is all individuals aged 15 and over living in a private household in one of the ten provinces

    Release date: 2001-08-08
Analysis (57)

Analysis (57) (0 to 10 of 57 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2019012
    Description:

    This article examines neighbourhood satisfaction of Canadian households based on the results of the 2018 Canadian Housing Survey (CHS). The neighbourhood satisfaction level of the principal decision maker (the 'household reference person') is examined alongside satisfaction with selected neighbourhood items-such as neighbourhood disorder, safety and services-and socio-demographic and household characteristics.

    Release date: 2019-11-22

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201900900001
    Description:

    The purpose of this study is to examine how the association between walkability or an "activity friendly environment" and physical activity varies across the lifespan and by the various domains of physical activity in Canadians by combining the newly-developed Canadian Active Living Environments Database (Can-ALE) with two nationally-representative health surveys. Data are from the 2016 Can-ALE database, the Canadian Health Measures Survey (2009-2015), and the Canadian Community Health Survey (2015-2016).

    Release date: 2019-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201900900002
    Description:

    The purpose of this study is to examine the association between walkability and obesity and self-rated general and mental health in a nationally-representative sample of Canadians in children and adults. A secondary purpose is to examine and describe the mediating effect of physical activity in the association between walkability and obesity. Data are from the 2016 Canadian Active Living Environments database and the Canadian Health Measures Survey (2009-2015).

    Release date: 2019-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-657-X2016002
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This study examines the settlement patterns of the immigrant population as well as certain social integration components. It starts by outlining recent trends in the settlement patterns of the immigrant population in Canadian census metropolitan areas, namely Toronto, Montréal and Vancouver. Based on data from the 2013 General Social Survey on Social Identity, it then looks at residence characteristics, such as type of municipality and concentration of immigrant population, according to four social integration components: personal network characteristics, relationships with neighbours, social participation and involvement in community activities, and sense of belonging.

    Release date: 2017-05-08

  • Articles and reports: 89-652-X2016002
    Description:

    This report examines Canadians’ perceptions of neighbourhood disorder. Based on data from the 2014 General Social Survey (GSS) on Victimization, an overview of perceptions of neighbourhood disorder is presented by type of disorder, by province, and by census metropolitan area (CMA). Differences by demographic characteristics are also explored. In addition, this article examines selected neighbourhood-level characteristics at the national level and for Canada’s eight largest CMAs.

    Release date: 2016-03-02

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201500714204
    Description:

    The objective of this study was to determine if the prevalence of overweight and obesity is associated with neighbourhood walkability. The analysis tested whether a dose-response relationship between the Street Smart Walk Score® and various measures of physical activity, overweight, and obesity existed in a large, population-based sample of adults in urban and suburban Ontario.

    Release date: 2015-07-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014357
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    An emerging area of subjective well-being (SWB) research is centered on the differences in the levels of SWB both across countries and among geographic regions within a country. The consideration of geographic differences would extend our knowledge about the determinants of SWB from "internal" factors of personality traits and individuals' socio-demographic characteristics to "external factors" embedded in individuals' environments. An issue with important theoretical and policy implications is whether the income of others in the same geographic area is associated with individuals' SWB. The association could be positive if people benefit from the improved resources, amenities, and social capital in high-income areas. The association could also be negative if people tend to emulate the lifestyles of their more affluent neighbours. Related empirical studies so far have not come to a consensus on this question.

    The present study attempts to contribute to this issue in two significant ways. First, this study examines whether the effect of the average income in a geographic area (locality income) on SWB is sensitive to the scale of geographic units. With a very large sample of survey respondents nested within three hierarchical levels of geographic areas, this study provides reliable estimates of the association of SWB with average incomes in immediate neighbourhoods (defined as "census dissemination areas"), local communities ("census tracts"), and municipalities ("census subdivisions"). Second, this study examines how the choice of control variables influences the estimated effect of locality income. By considering the effects of individual demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, self-evaluated general health, and area-level attributes in a sequential manner, it is possible to discuss the likely mechanisms through which locality income is related to individuals' SWB.

    Release date: 2014-02-20

  • Stats in brief: 99-014-X201100311861
    Description:

    These two short articles provide complementary analysis to the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS) analytical document on the composition of income in Canada. They focus on specific topics of interest. The first NHS in Brief is entitled Education and occupations of high-income Canadians, and the second, Persons living in low-income neighbourhoods.

    Release date: 2013-09-11

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2011022
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This study explores the spatial distribution of police-reported youth crime in Toronto. It examines how youth crime is geographically distributed in Toronto and endeavours to shed light on the links between police-reported youth crime and the neighbourhood characteristics that are most strongly associated with it. This report represents the second phase of the spatial analysis of police-reported crime data for Toronto which builds on the research paper, Neighbourhood Characteristics and the Distribution of Police-reported Crime in the City of Toronto.

    Release date: 2011-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201100111577
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This Juristat article presents information on perceptions of personal safety and crime as reported by Canadians aged 15 and over living in the ten provinces. Using data from the 2009 General Social Survey (GSS) on victimization, it analyses Canadians' satisfaction with their personal safety from crime while performing specific activities, at both the provincial and census metropolitan area levels. It also includes information on Canadians' perceptions of the level of crime and social disorder in their neighbourhoods.

    Release date: 2011-12-01
Reference (2)

Reference (2) ((2 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 17-507-X
    Description:

    "Neighbourhood insights" is your guide to the statistical information packages available from the Small Area and Administrative Data Division. The guide provides descriptions of the various databanks, the geographic availability and the pricing structure. The guide also contains sample statistical tables showing data for Canada.

    Release date: 2006-05-04

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89M0015G
    Description:

    The National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) is a long-term research program (started in 1994) that will track a large sample of children over many years, enabling researchers to monitor children's well-being and development.

    Not all the information collected for the first cycle of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth are included in this first microdata file. The second release will be in 1997.

    Release date: 1996-12-18
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