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All (9)

All (9) ((9 results))

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900410931
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Based on information available from the 2006 General Social Survey on families, this article will explore the nature of time children spend with their separated or divorced parents. Issues to be explored will include: the type of visitation/access arrangements; the length of time spent with each parent; whether the time involves leisure activities, regular care (school, daycare, social) and decision-making activities; and whether parents are satisfied with the arrangements they have for visitation/access.

    Release date: 2009-10-28

  • Public use microdata: 12M0021X
    Description:

    This package was designed to enable users to access and manipulate the microdata file for the 21st cycle (2007) of the General Social Survey (GSS). It contains information on the objectives, methodology and estimation procedures, as well as guidelines for releasing estimates based on the survey. Cycle 21 of the GSS collected data from persons aged 45 years and over living in private households in the 10 provinces of Canada. The survey covered a wide range of topics such as well-being, family composition, retirement decisions and plans, care giving and care receiving experiences, social networks and housing.

    Release date: 2009-05-04

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005261
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The upbringing of children is modeled as a modified principal agent problem in which children attempt to maximize their own well-being when faced with a parenting strategy chosen by the parent, to maximize parent's perception of family well-being. Thus, children as well as parents are players, but children have higher discount rates than parents. The simultaneity of parenting and child behaviour is confirmed using the 1994 Canadian National Longitudinal Survey of Children.

    Release date: 2005-08-02

  • Public use microdata: 12M0015X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Cycle 15 of the General Social Survey (GSS) is the third cycle to collect detailed information on family life in Canada. The previous GSS cycles that collected family data were Cycles 5 and 10. Topics include demographic characteristics such as age, sex, and marital status; family origin of parents; brothers and sisters; marriages of respondent; common-law unions of respondent; fertility and family intentions; values and attitudes; education history; work history; main activity and other characteristics.

    The target population for Cycle 15 of the GSS is all persons 15 years of age and older in Canada, excluding residents of the Yukon, Northwest Territories, and Nunavut, and full-time residents of institutions.

    Release date: 2003-04-04

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010078393
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Research studies have found a connection between spousal violence and separation, particularly for women. Using data from the 1999 General Social Survey, the 1993 Violence Against Women Survey, the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey and the Homicide Survey, this Juristat investigates the prevalence, nature and severity of violence that occurs following the breakdown of a marital union.

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20000005748
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Several different analyses have considered the impact of family and demographic change on the economic conditions affecting children (Dooley, 1988, 1991; McQuillan, 1992; Picot and Myles, 1996). The present study updates this reserach to 1997, while shifting the emphasis to families with very young children.

    Release date: 2001-06-22

  • Table: 92F0138M2000001
    Description:

    With this working paper, Statistics Canada is releasing 1991 Census data tabulated by a new geographic classification called "census metropolitan area and census agglomeration influenced zones", or MIZ. This classification applies to census subdivisions (municipalities) that lie outside census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations. This part of Canada covers 96% of the country's total land mass and contains 22% of its population, yet up to now we have been limited in our means of differentiating this vast area. The MIZ classification shows the influence of census metropolitan areas (CMA) and census agglomerations (CA) on surrounding census subdivisions as measured by commuting flows based on 1991 Census place of work data. This version of the MIZ classification also incorporates a preliminary version of a north concept that flags census subdivisions according to their location in the north or south of Canada.

    The series of tables presented here show detailed demographic, social and economic characteristics for Canada as a whole, for the six major regions of Canada, and for individual provinces and territories. Within each table, the data are subdivided into five categories: census metropolitan area or census agglomeration, strong MIZ, moderate MIZ, weak MIZ and no MIZ. Within each of these categories, the data are further subdivided into north and south.

    Readers are invited to review and use the data tables to assess whether this combined MIZ and north/south classification of non-CMA/CA areas provides sufficient detail to support data analysis and research. The intent of this MIZ classification is to reveal previously hidden data detail and thereby help users address issues related to this vast geographic area.

    This is the first of three related Geography working papers (catalogue no. 92F0138MPE). The second working paper (no. 2000-2, 92F0138MPE00002) provides background information about the methodology used to delineate the MIZ classification. The third working paper (no. 2000-3, 92F0138MPE00003) describes the methodology used to define a continuous line across Canada that separates the north from the south to further differentiate the MIZ classification.

    Release date: 2000-02-03

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19990024733
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article focuses on differences in the health status and health care utilization patterns of mothers in two-parent families, women who recently became lone parents, and women who had been lone parents for a longer period. Changes in the health of these women and their health care use over time are also explored.

    Release date: 1999-11-16

  • Public use microdata: 12M0010X
    Description:

    Cycle 10 collected data from persons 15 years and older and concentrated on the respondent's family. Topics covered include marital history, common- law unions, biological, adopted and step children, family origins, child leaving and fertility intentions.

    The target population of the GSS (General Social Survey) consisted of all individuals aged 15 and over living in a private household in one of the ten provinces.

    Release date: 1997-02-28
Data (4)

Data (4) ((4 results))

  • Public use microdata: 12M0021X
    Description:

    This package was designed to enable users to access and manipulate the microdata file for the 21st cycle (2007) of the General Social Survey (GSS). It contains information on the objectives, methodology and estimation procedures, as well as guidelines for releasing estimates based on the survey. Cycle 21 of the GSS collected data from persons aged 45 years and over living in private households in the 10 provinces of Canada. The survey covered a wide range of topics such as well-being, family composition, retirement decisions and plans, care giving and care receiving experiences, social networks and housing.

    Release date: 2009-05-04

  • Public use microdata: 12M0015X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Cycle 15 of the General Social Survey (GSS) is the third cycle to collect detailed information on family life in Canada. The previous GSS cycles that collected family data were Cycles 5 and 10. Topics include demographic characteristics such as age, sex, and marital status; family origin of parents; brothers and sisters; marriages of respondent; common-law unions of respondent; fertility and family intentions; values and attitudes; education history; work history; main activity and other characteristics.

    The target population for Cycle 15 of the GSS is all persons 15 years of age and older in Canada, excluding residents of the Yukon, Northwest Territories, and Nunavut, and full-time residents of institutions.

    Release date: 2003-04-04

  • Table: 92F0138M2000001
    Description:

    With this working paper, Statistics Canada is releasing 1991 Census data tabulated by a new geographic classification called "census metropolitan area and census agglomeration influenced zones", or MIZ. This classification applies to census subdivisions (municipalities) that lie outside census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations. This part of Canada covers 96% of the country's total land mass and contains 22% of its population, yet up to now we have been limited in our means of differentiating this vast area. The MIZ classification shows the influence of census metropolitan areas (CMA) and census agglomerations (CA) on surrounding census subdivisions as measured by commuting flows based on 1991 Census place of work data. This version of the MIZ classification also incorporates a preliminary version of a north concept that flags census subdivisions according to their location in the north or south of Canada.

    The series of tables presented here show detailed demographic, social and economic characteristics for Canada as a whole, for the six major regions of Canada, and for individual provinces and territories. Within each table, the data are subdivided into five categories: census metropolitan area or census agglomeration, strong MIZ, moderate MIZ, weak MIZ and no MIZ. Within each of these categories, the data are further subdivided into north and south.

    Readers are invited to review and use the data tables to assess whether this combined MIZ and north/south classification of non-CMA/CA areas provides sufficient detail to support data analysis and research. The intent of this MIZ classification is to reveal previously hidden data detail and thereby help users address issues related to this vast geographic area.

    This is the first of three related Geography working papers (catalogue no. 92F0138MPE). The second working paper (no. 2000-2, 92F0138MPE00002) provides background information about the methodology used to delineate the MIZ classification. The third working paper (no. 2000-3, 92F0138MPE00003) describes the methodology used to define a continuous line across Canada that separates the north from the south to further differentiate the MIZ classification.

    Release date: 2000-02-03

  • Public use microdata: 12M0010X
    Description:

    Cycle 10 collected data from persons 15 years and older and concentrated on the respondent's family. Topics covered include marital history, common- law unions, biological, adopted and step children, family origins, child leaving and fertility intentions.

    The target population of the GSS (General Social Survey) consisted of all individuals aged 15 and over living in a private household in one of the ten provinces.

    Release date: 1997-02-28
Analysis (5)

Analysis (5) ((5 results))

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900410931
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Based on information available from the 2006 General Social Survey on families, this article will explore the nature of time children spend with their separated or divorced parents. Issues to be explored will include: the type of visitation/access arrangements; the length of time spent with each parent; whether the time involves leisure activities, regular care (school, daycare, social) and decision-making activities; and whether parents are satisfied with the arrangements they have for visitation/access.

    Release date: 2009-10-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005261
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The upbringing of children is modeled as a modified principal agent problem in which children attempt to maximize their own well-being when faced with a parenting strategy chosen by the parent, to maximize parent's perception of family well-being. Thus, children as well as parents are players, but children have higher discount rates than parents. The simultaneity of parenting and child behaviour is confirmed using the 1994 Canadian National Longitudinal Survey of Children.

    Release date: 2005-08-02

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010078393
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Research studies have found a connection between spousal violence and separation, particularly for women. Using data from the 1999 General Social Survey, the 1993 Violence Against Women Survey, the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey and the Homicide Survey, this Juristat investigates the prevalence, nature and severity of violence that occurs following the breakdown of a marital union.

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20000005748
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Several different analyses have considered the impact of family and demographic change on the economic conditions affecting children (Dooley, 1988, 1991; McQuillan, 1992; Picot and Myles, 1996). The present study updates this reserach to 1997, while shifting the emphasis to families with very young children.

    Release date: 2001-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X19990024733
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article focuses on differences in the health status and health care utilization patterns of mothers in two-parent families, women who recently became lone parents, and women who had been lone parents for a longer period. Changes in the health of these women and their health care use over time are also explored.

    Release date: 1999-11-16
Reference (0)

Reference (0) (0 results)

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