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  • Public use microdata: 12M0026X
    Description:

    This package was designed to help users access and manipulate the public use microdata file (PUMF – provincial) for the 2014 General Social Survey (GSS) on Canadians’ Safety (Victimization). It contains the PUMF data and describes the objectives, methodology and estimation procedures for this survey as well as guidelines for releasing estimates.

    Statistics Canada collected data on the topic of Canadians’ safety (Victimization) for the sixth time in 2014. Data were previously collected in 1988 (Cycle 3), 1993 (Cycle 8), 1999 (Cycle 13), 2004 (Cycle 18) and 2009 (Cycle 23). The 2014 provincial GSS collected data from persons aged 15 years and over living in private households in Canada, excluding residents of the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut and full time residents of institutions.

    Between 2009 and 2014, the core content of the survey was revised in a number of ways, based on experience gained from earlier iterations. Some questions were revised to improve their clarity for respondents, and others were added or dropped following consultations with stakeholders from the justice sector, government and academic communities.

    Release date: 2016-07-27

  • Public use microdata: 12M0023X
    Description:

    This package was designed to enable users to access and manipulate the microdata file for Cycle 23 (2009) of the General Social Survey (GSS). It contains information on the objectives, methodology and estimation procedures, as well as guidelines for releasing estimates based on the survey.

    Cycle 23 collected data from persons 15 years and over living in private households in Canada, excluding residents of the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut; and full-time residents of institutions.

    The purpose of this survey is to better understand how Canadians perceive crime and the justice system and their experiences of victimization. The survey is designed to produce estimates of the extent to which persons are the victims of eight types of offences (assault, sexual assault, robbery, theft of personal property, breaking and entering, motor vehicle theft, theft of household property and vandalism); to examine the risk factors associated with victimization; to examine the rates of reporting to the police; and to evaluate the fear of crime and public perceptions of crime and the criminal justice system.

    Cycle 23 is the fifth cycle of the GSS dedicated to collecting data on victimization. Previous cycles had been conducted in 1988, 1993, 1999 and 2004. Cycle 23 includes most of the content from previous cycles as well as new content, added to reflect the society's emerging issues of crime prevention and Internet victimization.

    Release date: 2011-02-10

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2010022
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A large proportion of all victimization incidents are experienced by a relatively small number of victims who experienced multiple incidents. According to the 2004 General Social Survey (GSS) on Victimization, a little more than 10% of the population aged 15 and over were the victims of more than one crime during the 12 months preceding the survey, representing 60% of all criminal incidents. If one considers only violent crimes, 2% of the population accounted for 60% of all violent victimization reported to the GSS.

    Given that a small proportion of individuals and households face a significant proportion of crimes, as a result determining which characteristics increases a person's risk of being victimized will help to improve the effectiveness of crime prevention measures, and perhaps help prevent further incidents of victimization.

    Release date: 2010-01-06

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900410931
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Based on information available from the 2006 General Social Survey on families, this article will explore the nature of time children spend with their separated or divorced parents. Issues to be explored will include: the type of visitation/access arrangements; the length of time spent with each parent; whether the time involves leisure activities, regular care (school, daycare, social) and decision-making activities; and whether parents are satisfied with the arrangements they have for visitation/access.

    Release date: 2009-10-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900410932
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report is based on data from the 2007/2008 Victim Services Survey and provides a profile of victim service agencies in Canada that responded to the survey, as well as information on the clients they served. In reference to 2007/2008, the report presents data on the types of agencies in Canada, the services offered, staff and volunteers, and criminal injuries compensation applications and awards. Characteristics of clients, such as sex, age grouping and type of victimization, are based on counts of clients served on a snapshot day of May 28, 2008. The 2007/2008 Victim Services Survey was conducted by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics and was funded by Justice Canada's Policy Centre for Victim Issues. Victim service agencies surveyed include system-based, police-based and court-based agencies, sexual assault centres, other selected community-based agencies, and criminal injuries compensation and other financial benefit programs for victims of crime.

    Release date: 2009-10-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020108429
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Adult Correctional Services Survey (ACSS) collects annual aggregate data from all jurisdictions on the delivery of adult correctional services from both the provincial, territorial and federal correctional systems. Key themes include the average daily counts of adults in custodial facilities, including remand, as well as monthly counts of probationers; and new admissions (commencements) to correctional programs of sentenced custody, probation, conditional sentences and other community-based programs. The survey also captures information on conditional releases to the community, including parole and statutory release. In addition, the survey collects information on the financial and human resources involved in the delivery of adult correctional services. While trends are presented for the key units of count, the reference period for this release is 2000-2001.

    Release date: 2002-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020098428
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    The Juristat publication, "Pilot analysis of recidivism among convicted youth and young adults, 1999/00," summarizes trends from the provincial/territorial courts across Canada that provided data to the Adult Criminal Court Survey (ACCS) and the Youth Court Survey (YCS). This report attempts to gauge the prevalence of recidivism in young adults by examining the conviction histories of young adults convicted in Canadian criminal courts in 1999-2000. It also examines the transition from youth to adult offending, including patterns of re-offending, differences in conviction histories by age of onset and the impact of conviction history on court sentencing.

    Release date: 2002-10-23

  • Table: 85-226-X
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This publication presents data on young offender admissions to custody and community services, with breakdowns by custody (remand, secure, open) and probation, and key case characteristics, such as age, sex, Aboriginal/non-Aboriginal status and most serious offence. In addition, it includes data pertaining to releases from remand, secure custody and open custody, by sex and time served. These breakdowns are presented at the national and provincial/territorial levels.

    Data presented in this publication are drawn from two primary sources: 1) The Youth Custody and Community Services (YCCS) Survey. The objective of this survey is to collect and analyse information on the application of dispositions under the Young Offenders Act from provincial and territorial agencies responsible for youth corrections and programs. 2) The Youth Key Indicator Report (YKIR). This survey measures the average counts of youth in custody (remand, secure and open) and on probation. The YKIR describes average daily counts (caseload), which measure the volume of offenders held in custody or on probation on an average day at month-end. This information also provides an examination of youth incarceration and probation rates in Canada.

    Release date: 2002-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010118397
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This Juristat examines how Canadian crime rates compare to those in the United States. Using police-reported crime data, the analysis focuses on seven comparable offences: homicide, aggravated assault, robbery, break and enter, motor vehicle theft, theft, and arson. As well, three comparable offences were compared using charge/arrest data, including drug violations, impaired driving, and prostitution. Crime rate comparisons are presented at the national, regional, and metropolitan levels. This is a special topic Juristat of great interest to those working in the criminal justice system, as well as researchers, policy makers, and anyone who is interested in cross-national crime comparisons.

    Release date: 2001-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010098395
    Geography: Province or territory, Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    The 2000 police-reported statistics indicate that the overall crime rate in Canada decreased for the ninth consecutive year and is at its lowest point since 1978. In addition, data from studies such as the 1999 General Social Survey (GSS) suggest that many Canadians perceive crime as having stabilized over the past five years and feel less fearful of being a victim of crime in their neighbourhoods. Despite these positive indicators, the violent crime rate increased by 3% in 2000, the first increase in seven years. This report examines trends and characteristics for the most serious violent crime – homicide.

    Release date: 2001-10-31
Data (3)

Data (3) ((3 results))

  • Public use microdata: 12M0026X
    Description:

    This package was designed to help users access and manipulate the public use microdata file (PUMF – provincial) for the 2014 General Social Survey (GSS) on Canadians’ Safety (Victimization). It contains the PUMF data and describes the objectives, methodology and estimation procedures for this survey as well as guidelines for releasing estimates.

    Statistics Canada collected data on the topic of Canadians’ safety (Victimization) for the sixth time in 2014. Data were previously collected in 1988 (Cycle 3), 1993 (Cycle 8), 1999 (Cycle 13), 2004 (Cycle 18) and 2009 (Cycle 23). The 2014 provincial GSS collected data from persons aged 15 years and over living in private households in Canada, excluding residents of the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut and full time residents of institutions.

    Between 2009 and 2014, the core content of the survey was revised in a number of ways, based on experience gained from earlier iterations. Some questions were revised to improve their clarity for respondents, and others were added or dropped following consultations with stakeholders from the justice sector, government and academic communities.

    Release date: 2016-07-27

  • Public use microdata: 12M0023X
    Description:

    This package was designed to enable users to access and manipulate the microdata file for Cycle 23 (2009) of the General Social Survey (GSS). It contains information on the objectives, methodology and estimation procedures, as well as guidelines for releasing estimates based on the survey.

    Cycle 23 collected data from persons 15 years and over living in private households in Canada, excluding residents of the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut; and full-time residents of institutions.

    The purpose of this survey is to better understand how Canadians perceive crime and the justice system and their experiences of victimization. The survey is designed to produce estimates of the extent to which persons are the victims of eight types of offences (assault, sexual assault, robbery, theft of personal property, breaking and entering, motor vehicle theft, theft of household property and vandalism); to examine the risk factors associated with victimization; to examine the rates of reporting to the police; and to evaluate the fear of crime and public perceptions of crime and the criminal justice system.

    Cycle 23 is the fifth cycle of the GSS dedicated to collecting data on victimization. Previous cycles had been conducted in 1988, 1993, 1999 and 2004. Cycle 23 includes most of the content from previous cycles as well as new content, added to reflect the society's emerging issues of crime prevention and Internet victimization.

    Release date: 2011-02-10

  • Table: 85-226-X
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This publication presents data on young offender admissions to custody and community services, with breakdowns by custody (remand, secure, open) and probation, and key case characteristics, such as age, sex, Aboriginal/non-Aboriginal status and most serious offence. In addition, it includes data pertaining to releases from remand, secure custody and open custody, by sex and time served. These breakdowns are presented at the national and provincial/territorial levels.

    Data presented in this publication are drawn from two primary sources: 1) The Youth Custody and Community Services (YCCS) Survey. The objective of this survey is to collect and analyse information on the application of dispositions under the Young Offenders Act from provincial and territorial agencies responsible for youth corrections and programs. 2) The Youth Key Indicator Report (YKIR). This survey measures the average counts of youth in custody (remand, secure and open) and on probation. The YKIR describes average daily counts (caseload), which measure the volume of offenders held in custody or on probation on an average day at month-end. This information also provides an examination of youth incarceration and probation rates in Canada.

    Release date: 2002-10-09
Analysis (17)

Analysis (17) (0 to 10 of 17 results)

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2010022
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A large proportion of all victimization incidents are experienced by a relatively small number of victims who experienced multiple incidents. According to the 2004 General Social Survey (GSS) on Victimization, a little more than 10% of the population aged 15 and over were the victims of more than one crime during the 12 months preceding the survey, representing 60% of all criminal incidents. If one considers only violent crimes, 2% of the population accounted for 60% of all violent victimization reported to the GSS.

    Given that a small proportion of individuals and households face a significant proportion of crimes, as a result determining which characteristics increases a person's risk of being victimized will help to improve the effectiveness of crime prevention measures, and perhaps help prevent further incidents of victimization.

    Release date: 2010-01-06

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900410931
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Based on information available from the 2006 General Social Survey on families, this article will explore the nature of time children spend with their separated or divorced parents. Issues to be explored will include: the type of visitation/access arrangements; the length of time spent with each parent; whether the time involves leisure activities, regular care (school, daycare, social) and decision-making activities; and whether parents are satisfied with the arrangements they have for visitation/access.

    Release date: 2009-10-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900410932
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report is based on data from the 2007/2008 Victim Services Survey and provides a profile of victim service agencies in Canada that responded to the survey, as well as information on the clients they served. In reference to 2007/2008, the report presents data on the types of agencies in Canada, the services offered, staff and volunteers, and criminal injuries compensation applications and awards. Characteristics of clients, such as sex, age grouping and type of victimization, are based on counts of clients served on a snapshot day of May 28, 2008. The 2007/2008 Victim Services Survey was conducted by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics and was funded by Justice Canada's Policy Centre for Victim Issues. Victim service agencies surveyed include system-based, police-based and court-based agencies, sexual assault centres, other selected community-based agencies, and criminal injuries compensation and other financial benefit programs for victims of crime.

    Release date: 2009-10-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020108429
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Adult Correctional Services Survey (ACSS) collects annual aggregate data from all jurisdictions on the delivery of adult correctional services from both the provincial, territorial and federal correctional systems. Key themes include the average daily counts of adults in custodial facilities, including remand, as well as monthly counts of probationers; and new admissions (commencements) to correctional programs of sentenced custody, probation, conditional sentences and other community-based programs. The survey also captures information on conditional releases to the community, including parole and statutory release. In addition, the survey collects information on the financial and human resources involved in the delivery of adult correctional services. While trends are presented for the key units of count, the reference period for this release is 2000-2001.

    Release date: 2002-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020098428
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    The Juristat publication, "Pilot analysis of recidivism among convicted youth and young adults, 1999/00," summarizes trends from the provincial/territorial courts across Canada that provided data to the Adult Criminal Court Survey (ACCS) and the Youth Court Survey (YCS). This report attempts to gauge the prevalence of recidivism in young adults by examining the conviction histories of young adults convicted in Canadian criminal courts in 1999-2000. It also examines the transition from youth to adult offending, including patterns of re-offending, differences in conviction histories by age of onset and the impact of conviction history on court sentencing.

    Release date: 2002-10-23

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010118397
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This Juristat examines how Canadian crime rates compare to those in the United States. Using police-reported crime data, the analysis focuses on seven comparable offences: homicide, aggravated assault, robbery, break and enter, motor vehicle theft, theft, and arson. As well, three comparable offences were compared using charge/arrest data, including drug violations, impaired driving, and prostitution. Crime rate comparisons are presented at the national, regional, and metropolitan levels. This is a special topic Juristat of great interest to those working in the criminal justice system, as well as researchers, policy makers, and anyone who is interested in cross-national crime comparisons.

    Release date: 2001-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010098395
    Geography: Province or territory, Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    The 2000 police-reported statistics indicate that the overall crime rate in Canada decreased for the ninth consecutive year and is at its lowest point since 1978. In addition, data from studies such as the 1999 General Social Survey (GSS) suggest that many Canadians perceive crime as having stabilized over the past five years and feel less fearful of being a victim of crime in their neighbourhoods. Despite these positive indicators, the violent crime rate increased by 3% in 2000, the first increase in seven years. This report examines trends and characteristics for the most serious violent crime – homicide.

    Release date: 2001-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010078393
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Research studies have found a connection between spousal violence and separation, particularly for women. Using data from the 1999 General Social Survey, the 1993 Violence Against Women Survey, the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey and the Homicide Survey, this Juristat investigates the prevalence, nature and severity of violence that occurs following the breakdown of a marital union.

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Journals and periodicals: 85-551-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report describes some pertinent issues of hate crime: previous findings, international comparisons, recent initiatives, current data sources, and a description of police resources. It also includes findings from the 1999 General Social Survey, which measured self-reported hate crime victimization incidents at the national level.

    Release date: 2001-01-24

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20000118384
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This Juristat outlines the characteristics of criminal harassment incidents as well as the characteristics of the accused and victim for 1999, and identifies trends over the past five years. (Trend data are only available for the five-year period from 1995 to 1999.) This Juristat updates a similar Juristat written in 1996 using information collected from police forces and adult criminal courts to review the charges laid and sentences imposed for cases involving criminal harassment.

    There are many different types of stalkers. However, most victims of criminal harassment know their accused quite well and, in many instances, the stalker and victim were involved in a previous relationship.

    Release date: 2000-11-29
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