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  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2014092
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    Using data from the Provincial KLEMS database, this paper asks whether provincial economies have undergone structural change in their business sectors since 2000. It does so by applying a measure of industrial change (the dissimilarity index) using measures of output (real GDP) and hours worked. The paper also develops a statistical methodology to test whether the shifts in the industrial composition of output and hours worked over the period are due to random year-over-year changes in industrial structure or long-term systematic change in the structure of provincial economies. The paper is designed to inform discussion and analysis of recent changes in industrial composition at the national level, notably, the decline in manufacturing output and the concomitant rise of resource industries, and the implications of this change for provincial economies.

    Release date: 2014-05-07

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2012003
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This Economic Insight discusses price differences between Canada and the United States. It is based on the concepts and methods from Statistics Canada's Purchasing Power Parity program.

    Release date: 2012-01-04

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2010065
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, the authors provide a detailed social accounting matrix (SAM), which incorporates the income and financial flows into the standard input-output matrix, for the Canadian economy for 2004. Second, they use the SAM to assess the strength of the real-financial linkages by calculating and comparing real SAM multipliers and financial social accounting matrix (FSAM) multipliers. For FSAM multipliers, financial flows are endogenous, whereas for real SAM multipliers they are not. The results show that taking into account financial flows increases the impact of a final demand shock on Canadian output. Financial flows also play an important role in determining the cumulative effect of an income shock or the availability of investment funds. Between 2008 and the first half of 2009, financial institutions shifted their investments toward government bonds, short-term paper, and foreign investments. This shift together with the fact that non-financial institutions were unwilling or unable to increase their financial liabilities, led to estimated declines in all GDP multipliers between 2008 and the first half of 2009 (2009H1). The main advantage of using the extended input-output analysis is that it provides a simple framework, with very few assumptions, which allows the assessment of the strength of real-financial linkages by means of multipliers. However, the methodology is subject to the Lucas critique, that as shocks shift prices, agents cannot adjust. Such a framework is, nevertheless, appropriate in short-term impact analysis such as this study.

    Release date: 2011-05-20

  • Notices and consultations: 88F0006X2010001
    Description:

    Summary of the technical workshop on Estimates of Research and Development in the Higher Education Sector (HERD), held in Ottawa on October 16, 2009. Data users and experts from universities and colleges, granting councils and provincial and federal government departments proposed general and detailed recommendations for the methodology applied in estimating the HERD.

    Release date: 2010-02-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2009058
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the different types of deflators that are used to compare volume estimates of national income and production across countries. It argues that these deflators need to be tailored to the specific income concept used for study. If the potential to spend concept is employed, a purchasing power deflator is needed. If a production based concept is used, a producing power deflator is necessary. The paper argues that present practice produces a hybrid deflator that fails both purposes when terms of trade shifts are large and offers a solution.

    Release date: 2009-12-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800011013
    Description:

    Collecting data using audio recordings for interviewing can be an effective and versatile data collection tool. These recordings however can lead to large files which are cumbersome to manage. Technological developments including better audio software development tools and increased adoption of broadband connections has eased the burden in the collection of audio data. This paper focuses on technologies and techniques used to record and manage audio collected surveys using laptops, telephones and internet connections. The process outlined involves devices connecting directly to the phone receiver which streams conversations directly to the laptop for storage and transmission.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2009004
    Description:

    This paper provides an analysis of technological change within the Canadian economy based on data from the 2006 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology where firms indicated how they introduced significantly improved technologies. The paper explores differences in the use of methods of introduction of significantly improved technologies by firm/organization size and by industry in both the private and public sectors.

    The paper begins with a brief presentation of previous work carried out on technology introduction. The methodology is described. A description of concepts used in the analysis will follow. Analytic results examining technological change in the private sector overall, by industry and by size, and the public sector overall, by industry and by size are presented. A comparison of technological change in the private and public sectors follows. The paper concludes with a discussion of analytic results and further analytic work that could be undertaken.

    Release date: 2009-11-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2005028
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the level of labour productivity in Canada relative to that of the United States in 1999. In doing so, it addresses two main issues. The first is the comparability of the measures of GDP and labour inputs that the statistical agency in each country produces. Second, it investigates how a price index can be constructed to reconcile estimates of Canadian and U.S. GDP per hour worked that are calculated in Canadian and U.S. dollars respectively. After doing so, and taking into account alternative assumptions about Canada/U.S. prices, the paper provides point estimates of Canada's relative labour productivity of the total economy of around 93% that of the United States. The paper points out that at least a 10 percentage point confidence interval should be applied to these estimates. The size of the range is particularly sensitive to assumptions that are made about import and export prices.

    Release date: 2005-01-20

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2004006
    Description:

    Biotechnology is a pervasive technology used in several industrial sectors, making collecting sound data a real challenge. This paper describes the methodology of the Biotechnology Use and Development Survey. Some of the specific issues dealt with are the definitions of biotechnology and innovative biotechnology firms, the target population, sampling, data collection procedures, and data quality evaluation.

    Release date: 2004-03-05

  • Journals and periodicals: 56-506-X
    Description:

    Information and communications technologies in Canada is designed to profile the growth and development of the Canadian information and communications technologies (ICT) sector. The publication provides a statistical overview of the ICT sector on the basis of key economic variables, including production, employment, international trade, revenue and research and development expenditures.

    Statistics Canada's first quantification of the ICT sector appeared in the compendium publication entitled Networked Canada: beyond the information highway, catalogue no. 56-504-XIE. This publication updates these estimates with the most recent data, while providing improved industrial coverage and in-depth analysis of Canada's ICT sector.

    Many different data sources have been used throughout the project, and while all efforts have been made to maximize the amount of data available, it has not been possible in all instances to consistently report for all ICT industries and all relevant variables. The conversion to the new North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) has largely contributed to these difficulties, and it is expected that a greater range of data will be available once all of the survey programs begin reporting on the basis of this new industry classification.

    Release date: 2001-12-17
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Analysis (16)

Analysis (16) (0 to 10 of 16 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2014092
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    Using data from the Provincial KLEMS database, this paper asks whether provincial economies have undergone structural change in their business sectors since 2000. It does so by applying a measure of industrial change (the dissimilarity index) using measures of output (real GDP) and hours worked. The paper also develops a statistical methodology to test whether the shifts in the industrial composition of output and hours worked over the period are due to random year-over-year changes in industrial structure or long-term systematic change in the structure of provincial economies. The paper is designed to inform discussion and analysis of recent changes in industrial composition at the national level, notably, the decline in manufacturing output and the concomitant rise of resource industries, and the implications of this change for provincial economies.

    Release date: 2014-05-07

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2012003
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This Economic Insight discusses price differences between Canada and the United States. It is based on the concepts and methods from Statistics Canada's Purchasing Power Parity program.

    Release date: 2012-01-04

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2010065
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, the authors provide a detailed social accounting matrix (SAM), which incorporates the income and financial flows into the standard input-output matrix, for the Canadian economy for 2004. Second, they use the SAM to assess the strength of the real-financial linkages by calculating and comparing real SAM multipliers and financial social accounting matrix (FSAM) multipliers. For FSAM multipliers, financial flows are endogenous, whereas for real SAM multipliers they are not. The results show that taking into account financial flows increases the impact of a final demand shock on Canadian output. Financial flows also play an important role in determining the cumulative effect of an income shock or the availability of investment funds. Between 2008 and the first half of 2009, financial institutions shifted their investments toward government bonds, short-term paper, and foreign investments. This shift together with the fact that non-financial institutions were unwilling or unable to increase their financial liabilities, led to estimated declines in all GDP multipliers between 2008 and the first half of 2009 (2009H1). The main advantage of using the extended input-output analysis is that it provides a simple framework, with very few assumptions, which allows the assessment of the strength of real-financial linkages by means of multipliers. However, the methodology is subject to the Lucas critique, that as shocks shift prices, agents cannot adjust. Such a framework is, nevertheless, appropriate in short-term impact analysis such as this study.

    Release date: 2011-05-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2009058
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the different types of deflators that are used to compare volume estimates of national income and production across countries. It argues that these deflators need to be tailored to the specific income concept used for study. If the potential to spend concept is employed, a purchasing power deflator is needed. If a production based concept is used, a producing power deflator is necessary. The paper argues that present practice produces a hybrid deflator that fails both purposes when terms of trade shifts are large and offers a solution.

    Release date: 2009-12-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800011013
    Description:

    Collecting data using audio recordings for interviewing can be an effective and versatile data collection tool. These recordings however can lead to large files which are cumbersome to manage. Technological developments including better audio software development tools and increased adoption of broadband connections has eased the burden in the collection of audio data. This paper focuses on technologies and techniques used to record and manage audio collected surveys using laptops, telephones and internet connections. The process outlined involves devices connecting directly to the phone receiver which streams conversations directly to the laptop for storage and transmission.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2009004
    Description:

    This paper provides an analysis of technological change within the Canadian economy based on data from the 2006 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology where firms indicated how they introduced significantly improved technologies. The paper explores differences in the use of methods of introduction of significantly improved technologies by firm/organization size and by industry in both the private and public sectors.

    The paper begins with a brief presentation of previous work carried out on technology introduction. The methodology is described. A description of concepts used in the analysis will follow. Analytic results examining technological change in the private sector overall, by industry and by size, and the public sector overall, by industry and by size are presented. A comparison of technological change in the private and public sectors follows. The paper concludes with a discussion of analytic results and further analytic work that could be undertaken.

    Release date: 2009-11-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2005028
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the level of labour productivity in Canada relative to that of the United States in 1999. In doing so, it addresses two main issues. The first is the comparability of the measures of GDP and labour inputs that the statistical agency in each country produces. Second, it investigates how a price index can be constructed to reconcile estimates of Canadian and U.S. GDP per hour worked that are calculated in Canadian and U.S. dollars respectively. After doing so, and taking into account alternative assumptions about Canada/U.S. prices, the paper provides point estimates of Canada's relative labour productivity of the total economy of around 93% that of the United States. The paper points out that at least a 10 percentage point confidence interval should be applied to these estimates. The size of the range is particularly sensitive to assumptions that are made about import and export prices.

    Release date: 2005-01-20

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2004006
    Description:

    Biotechnology is a pervasive technology used in several industrial sectors, making collecting sound data a real challenge. This paper describes the methodology of the Biotechnology Use and Development Survey. Some of the specific issues dealt with are the definitions of biotechnology and innovative biotechnology firms, the target population, sampling, data collection procedures, and data quality evaluation.

    Release date: 2004-03-05

  • Journals and periodicals: 56-506-X
    Description:

    Information and communications technologies in Canada is designed to profile the growth and development of the Canadian information and communications technologies (ICT) sector. The publication provides a statistical overview of the ICT sector on the basis of key economic variables, including production, employment, international trade, revenue and research and development expenditures.

    Statistics Canada's first quantification of the ICT sector appeared in the compendium publication entitled Networked Canada: beyond the information highway, catalogue no. 56-504-XIE. This publication updates these estimates with the most recent data, while providing improved industrial coverage and in-depth analysis of Canada's ICT sector.

    Many different data sources have been used throughout the project, and while all efforts have been made to maximize the amount of data available, it has not been possible in all instances to consistently report for all ICT industries and all relevant variables. The conversion to the new North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) has largely contributed to these difficulties, and it is expected that a greater range of data will be available once all of the survey programs begin reporting on the basis of this new industry classification.

    Release date: 2001-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2000003
    Description:

    In the spring of 1999, the Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division of Statistics Canada (SIEID) decided to review the methods it uses to estimate Higher Education R&D Expenditures (HERD) and Health Gross Expenditures on R&D (Health GERD). The manner in which research is performed and funded in Canadian universities and research hospitals has evolved in recent years, and current methodologies may not take these changes into account. By improving HERD, the health GERD estimates will also benefit. It may be possible to improve them yet again by building upon recent work at Statistics Canada on biotechnology R&D in Canadian Industry.

    In September 1999, an initial study and its recommendations generated a positive reaction from a group of professionals in the university and health research fields. SIEID then created a Working Group and hired a facilitator to examine current estimation methods, to recommend revisions where appropriate, and to produce a framework for an improved program in this area. This document is the final report written by the facilitator, Mireille Brochu.

    Release date: 2001-05-23
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Notices and consultations: 88F0006X2010001
    Description:

    Summary of the technical workshop on Estimates of Research and Development in the Higher Education Sector (HERD), held in Ottawa on October 16, 2009. Data users and experts from universities and colleges, granting councils and provincial and federal government departments proposed general and detailed recommendations for the methodology applied in estimating the HERD.

    Release date: 2010-02-26
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