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All (13) (0 to 10 of 13 results)

  • Geographic files and documentation: 92-162-G
    Description:

    This guide describes the content and applications of the product, as well as providing information on data quality, record layouts and methodology.

    Release date: 2018-11-14

  • Geographic files and documentation: 92-162-X
    Description:

    The Census Subdivision Boundary File contains the boundaries of all census subdivisions which combined cover all of Canada. A census subdivision is a municipality or an area treated as an equivalent to a municipality for statistical purposes (for example, Indian reserves and unorganized territories). The file provides a framework for mapping and geographic analysis that is possible using commercially available geographic information systems (GIS) or other mapping software.

    A reference guide is included.

    Release date: 2018-11-14

  • Geographic files and documentation: 92-160-G
    Description:

    This reference guide is intended for users of the census boundary files. The guide provides an overview of the files, the general methodology used to create them, and important technical information for users.

    Release date: 2017-09-13

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 98-314-X2011051
    Description:

    Readers will find a complete analysis of factors affecting the comparability of Language results between the censuses in the Methodological Document on the 2011 Census Language Data.

    Release date: 2013-05-03

  • Stats in brief: 98-311-X201100311674
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    These short analytical articles provide complementary analysis to the 2011 Census analytical document. These articles allow for a more in-depth look to relevant topics related to the Canadian population. The three articles linked to the age and sex release are entitled 'Centenarians in Canada,' 'Generations in Canada' and 'The census: A tool for planning at the local level.'

    Release date: 2012-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2010002
    Description:

    This report compares the aggregate income estimates as published by four different statistical programs. The System of National Accounts provides a portrait of economic activity at the macro economic level. The three other programs considered generate data from a micro-economic perspective: two are survey based (Census of Population and Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics) and the third derives all its results from administrative data (Annual Estimates for Census Families and Individuals). A review of the conceptual differences across the sources is followed by a discussion of coverage issues and processing discrepancies that might influence estimates. Aggregate income estimates with adjustments where possible to account for known conceptual differences are compared. Even allowing for statistical variability, some reconciliation issues remain. These are sometimes are explained by the use of different methodologies or data gathering instruments but they sometimes also remain unexplained.

    Release date: 2010-04-06

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 91F0015M2008010
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The objective of this study is to examine the feasibility of using provincial and territorial health care files of new registrants as an independent measure of preliminary inter-provincial and inter-territorial migration. The study aims at measuring the conceptual and quantifiable differences between this data source and our present source of the Canada Revenue Agency's Canadian Child Tax Benefit.

    Criteria were established to assess the quality and appropriateness of these provincial/territorial health care records as a proxy for our migration estimates: coverage, consistency, timeliness, reliability, level of detail, uniformity and accuracy.

    Based on the present analysis, the paper finds that these data do not ameliorate the estimates and would not be suitable at this time as a measure of inter-provincial/territorial migration. These Medicare data though are an important independent data source that can be used for quality evaluation.

    Release date: 2009-01-13

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-592-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This reference document presents an overview of the different questions used by Statistics Canada to identify Aboriginal peoples. It is divided into three parts. Part one is a brief description of the data sources and their limitations. Part 2 deals with the 2006 census questions used to identify Aboriginal peoples while Part 3 deals with the identification questions used in the Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) and the Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS).

    Release date: 2007-06-07

  • Journals and periodicals: 85F0036X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study documents the methodological and technical challenges that are involved in performing analysis on small groups using a sample survey, oversampling, response rate, non-response rate due to language, release feasibility and sampling variability. It is based on the 1999 General Social Survey (GSS) on victimization.

    Release date: 2002-05-14

  • Table: 92F0138M2000001
    Description:

    With this working paper, Statistics Canada is releasing 1991 Census data tabulated by a new geographic classification called "census metropolitan area and census agglomeration influenced zones", or MIZ. This classification applies to census subdivisions (municipalities) that lie outside census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations. This part of Canada covers 96% of the country's total land mass and contains 22% of its population, yet up to now we have been limited in our means of differentiating this vast area. The MIZ classification shows the influence of census metropolitan areas (CMA) and census agglomerations (CA) on surrounding census subdivisions as measured by commuting flows based on 1991 Census place of work data. This version of the MIZ classification also incorporates a preliminary version of a north concept that flags census subdivisions according to their location in the north or south of Canada.

    The series of tables presented here show detailed demographic, social and economic characteristics for Canada as a whole, for the six major regions of Canada, and for individual provinces and territories. Within each table, the data are subdivided into five categories: census metropolitan area or census agglomeration, strong MIZ, moderate MIZ, weak MIZ and no MIZ. Within each of these categories, the data are further subdivided into north and south.

    Readers are invited to review and use the data tables to assess whether this combined MIZ and north/south classification of non-CMA/CA areas provides sufficient detail to support data analysis and research. The intent of this MIZ classification is to reveal previously hidden data detail and thereby help users address issues related to this vast geographic area.

    This is the first of three related Geography working papers (catalogue no. 92F0138MPE). The second working paper (no. 2000-2, 92F0138MPE00002) provides background information about the methodology used to delineate the MIZ classification. The third working paper (no. 2000-3, 92F0138MPE00003) describes the methodology used to define a continuous line across Canada that separates the north from the south to further differentiate the MIZ classification.

    Release date: 2000-02-03
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Table: 92F0138M2000001
    Description:

    With this working paper, Statistics Canada is releasing 1991 Census data tabulated by a new geographic classification called "census metropolitan area and census agglomeration influenced zones", or MIZ. This classification applies to census subdivisions (municipalities) that lie outside census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations. This part of Canada covers 96% of the country's total land mass and contains 22% of its population, yet up to now we have been limited in our means of differentiating this vast area. The MIZ classification shows the influence of census metropolitan areas (CMA) and census agglomerations (CA) on surrounding census subdivisions as measured by commuting flows based on 1991 Census place of work data. This version of the MIZ classification also incorporates a preliminary version of a north concept that flags census subdivisions according to their location in the north or south of Canada.

    The series of tables presented here show detailed demographic, social and economic characteristics for Canada as a whole, for the six major regions of Canada, and for individual provinces and territories. Within each table, the data are subdivided into five categories: census metropolitan area or census agglomeration, strong MIZ, moderate MIZ, weak MIZ and no MIZ. Within each of these categories, the data are further subdivided into north and south.

    Readers are invited to review and use the data tables to assess whether this combined MIZ and north/south classification of non-CMA/CA areas provides sufficient detail to support data analysis and research. The intent of this MIZ classification is to reveal previously hidden data detail and thereby help users address issues related to this vast geographic area.

    This is the first of three related Geography working papers (catalogue no. 92F0138MPE). The second working paper (no. 2000-2, 92F0138MPE00002) provides background information about the methodology used to delineate the MIZ classification. The third working paper (no. 2000-3, 92F0138MPE00003) describes the methodology used to define a continuous line across Canada that separates the north from the south to further differentiate the MIZ classification.

    Release date: 2000-02-03
Analysis (5)

Analysis (5) ((5 results))

  • Stats in brief: 98-311-X201100311674
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    These short analytical articles provide complementary analysis to the 2011 Census analytical document. These articles allow for a more in-depth look to relevant topics related to the Canadian population. The three articles linked to the age and sex release are entitled 'Centenarians in Canada,' 'Generations in Canada' and 'The census: A tool for planning at the local level.'

    Release date: 2012-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2010002
    Description:

    This report compares the aggregate income estimates as published by four different statistical programs. The System of National Accounts provides a portrait of economic activity at the macro economic level. The three other programs considered generate data from a micro-economic perspective: two are survey based (Census of Population and Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics) and the third derives all its results from administrative data (Annual Estimates for Census Families and Individuals). A review of the conceptual differences across the sources is followed by a discussion of coverage issues and processing discrepancies that might influence estimates. Aggregate income estimates with adjustments where possible to account for known conceptual differences are compared. Even allowing for statistical variability, some reconciliation issues remain. These are sometimes are explained by the use of different methodologies or data gathering instruments but they sometimes also remain unexplained.

    Release date: 2010-04-06

  • Journals and periodicals: 85F0036X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study documents the methodological and technical challenges that are involved in performing analysis on small groups using a sample survey, oversampling, response rate, non-response rate due to language, release feasibility and sampling variability. It is based on the 1999 General Social Survey (GSS) on victimization.

    Release date: 2002-05-14

  • Articles and reports: 92F0138M2000002
    Description:

    This working paper provides an overview of census metropolitan and census agglomeration influenced zones, or MIZ, their background and the methodology used to define them. The MIZ classification is an approach to better differentiate areas of Canada outside of census metropolitan areas (CMA) and census agglomerations (CA). Census subdivisions that lie outside these areas are classified into one of four zones of influence ranging from "strong" to "no" influence according to the degree of influence that CMA/CAs have on them. The MIZ classification fills a gap in Statistics Canada's geographic framework and promotes data integration since we expect it will be possible to obtain survey data as well as census data based on the same geographic structure. Studies done with a preliminary version of MIZ showed the potential of MIZ to reveal the diversity of non-metropolitan Canada. Based on feedback received on that initial research, this working paper reports on more recent work that has been done to refine the number and data breakpoints for MIZ categories and to examine the additional variables of distances between census subdivisions (CSDs), physical adjacency and a north-south allocation.

    This is the second in a series of three related Geography working papers (catalogue no. 92F0138MPE) that describe a new statistical area classification that includes census metropolitan areas/census agglomerations, MIZ and the North concept. The first working paper (no. 2000-1, 92F0138MPE00001) briefly describes MIZ and provides tables of selected socio-economic characteristics from the 1991 Census tabulated by the MIZ categories. The third working paper (no. 2000-3, 92F0138MPE00003) describes the North concept and the methodology used to define a continuous line across Canada that separates the north from the south to further differentiate the MIZ classification.

    Release date: 2000-02-03

  • Articles and reports: 92F0138M2000003
    Description:

    Statistics Canada's interest in a common delineation of the north for statistical analysis purposes evolved from research to devise a classification to further differentiate the largely rural and remote areas that make up 96% of Canada's land area. That research led to the establishment of the census metropolitan area and census agglomeration influenced zone (MIZ) concept. When applied to census subdivisions, the MIZ categories did not work as well in northern areas as in the south. Therefore, the Geography Division set out to determine a north-south divide that would differentiate the north from the south independent of any standard geographic area boundaries.

    This working paper describes the methodology used to define a continuous line across Canada to separate the north from the south, as well as lines marking transition zones on both sides of the north-south line. It also describes the indicators selected to derive the north-south line and makes comparisons to alternative definitions of the north. The resulting classification of the north complements the MIZ classification. Together, census metropolitan areas, census agglomerations, MIZ and the North form a new Statistical Area Classification (SAC) for Canada.

    Two related Geography working papers (catalogue no. 92F0138MPE) provide further details about the MIZ classification. Working paper no. 2000-1 (92F0138MPE00001) briefly describes MIZ and includes tables of selected socio-economic characteristics from the 1991 Census tabulated by the MIZ categories, and working paper no. 2000-2 (92F0138MPE00002) describes the methodology used to define the MIZ classification.

    Release date: 2000-02-03
Reference (7)

Reference (7) ((7 results))

  • Geographic files and documentation: 92-162-G
    Description:

    This guide describes the content and applications of the product, as well as providing information on data quality, record layouts and methodology.

    Release date: 2018-11-14

  • Geographic files and documentation: 92-162-X
    Description:

    The Census Subdivision Boundary File contains the boundaries of all census subdivisions which combined cover all of Canada. A census subdivision is a municipality or an area treated as an equivalent to a municipality for statistical purposes (for example, Indian reserves and unorganized territories). The file provides a framework for mapping and geographic analysis that is possible using commercially available geographic information systems (GIS) or other mapping software.

    A reference guide is included.

    Release date: 2018-11-14

  • Geographic files and documentation: 92-160-G
    Description:

    This reference guide is intended for users of the census boundary files. The guide provides an overview of the files, the general methodology used to create them, and important technical information for users.

    Release date: 2017-09-13

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 98-314-X2011051
    Description:

    Readers will find a complete analysis of factors affecting the comparability of Language results between the censuses in the Methodological Document on the 2011 Census Language Data.

    Release date: 2013-05-03

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 91F0015M2008010
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The objective of this study is to examine the feasibility of using provincial and territorial health care files of new registrants as an independent measure of preliminary inter-provincial and inter-territorial migration. The study aims at measuring the conceptual and quantifiable differences between this data source and our present source of the Canada Revenue Agency's Canadian Child Tax Benefit.

    Criteria were established to assess the quality and appropriateness of these provincial/territorial health care records as a proxy for our migration estimates: coverage, consistency, timeliness, reliability, level of detail, uniformity and accuracy.

    Based on the present analysis, the paper finds that these data do not ameliorate the estimates and would not be suitable at this time as a measure of inter-provincial/territorial migration. These Medicare data though are an important independent data source that can be used for quality evaluation.

    Release date: 2009-01-13

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-592-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This reference document presents an overview of the different questions used by Statistics Canada to identify Aboriginal peoples. It is divided into three parts. Part one is a brief description of the data sources and their limitations. Part 2 deals with the 2006 census questions used to identify Aboriginal peoples while Part 3 deals with the identification questions used in the Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) and the Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS).

    Release date: 2007-06-07

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 92-371-X
    Description:

    This report deals with sampling and weighting, a process whereby certain characteristics are collected and processed for a random sample of dwellings and persons identified in the complete census enumeration. Data for the whole population are then obtained by scaling up the results for the sample to the full population level. The use of sampling may lead to substantial reductions in costs and respondent burden, or alternatively, can allow the scope of a census to be broadened at the same cost.

    Release date: 1999-12-07
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