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  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016381
    Description:

    Changes in health status may affect not just the individuals who experience such changes, but also their family members. For example, if the main earner in a family loses his or her ability to generate income due to a health shock, it invariably affects the financial situation of the spouse and other dependents. In addition, spouses and working-age children may themselves increase or reduce their labour supply to make up for the lost income (“added worker effect”) or care for a sick family member (“caregiver effect”). Since consumption smoothing and self-insurance occur at the household level, the financial effects of health for other family members have important policy implications. To shed light on such effects, this study analyzes how one spouse’s cancer diagnosis affects the employment and earnings of the other spouse and (before-tax) total family income using administrative data from Canada.

    Release date: 2016-07-22

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016380
    Description:

    Every year, thousands of workers lose their job in many industrialized countries (OECD 2013). Faced with job loss, displaced workers may choose to return to school to help them reintegrate into the labour force. Job losses in a given local labour market may also induce workers who have not yet been laid off to pre-emptively enrol in postsecondary (PS) institutions, as a precautionary measure. Combining microdata and grouped data, this study examines these two dimensions of the relationship between layoffs and PS enrolment over the 2001-to-2011 period.

    Release date: 2016-07-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2016001
    Description:

    Every year, thousands of workers lose their jobs as firms reduce the size of their workforce in response to growing competition, technological changes, changing trade patterns and numerous other factors. Thousands of workers also start a job with a new employer as new firms enter a product market and existing firms expand or replace employees who recently left. This worker reallocation process across employers is generally seen as contributing to productivity growth and rising living standards. To measure this labour reallocation process, labour market indicators such as hiring rates and layoff rates are needed. In response to growing demand for subprovincial labour market information and taking advantage of unique administrative datasets, Statistics Canada is producing hiring rates and layoff rates by economic region of residence. This document describes the data sources, conceptual and methodological issues, and other matters pertaining to these two indicators.

    Release date: 2016-06-27
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  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016381
    Description:

    Changes in health status may affect not just the individuals who experience such changes, but also their family members. For example, if the main earner in a family loses his or her ability to generate income due to a health shock, it invariably affects the financial situation of the spouse and other dependents. In addition, spouses and working-age children may themselves increase or reduce their labour supply to make up for the lost income (“added worker effect”) or care for a sick family member (“caregiver effect”). Since consumption smoothing and self-insurance occur at the household level, the financial effects of health for other family members have important policy implications. To shed light on such effects, this study analyzes how one spouse’s cancer diagnosis affects the employment and earnings of the other spouse and (before-tax) total family income using administrative data from Canada.

    Release date: 2016-07-22

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016380
    Description:

    Every year, thousands of workers lose their job in many industrialized countries (OECD 2013). Faced with job loss, displaced workers may choose to return to school to help them reintegrate into the labour force. Job losses in a given local labour market may also induce workers who have not yet been laid off to pre-emptively enrol in postsecondary (PS) institutions, as a precautionary measure. Combining microdata and grouped data, this study examines these two dimensions of the relationship between layoffs and PS enrolment over the 2001-to-2011 period.

    Release date: 2016-07-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2016001
    Description:

    Every year, thousands of workers lose their jobs as firms reduce the size of their workforce in response to growing competition, technological changes, changing trade patterns and numerous other factors. Thousands of workers also start a job with a new employer as new firms enter a product market and existing firms expand or replace employees who recently left. This worker reallocation process across employers is generally seen as contributing to productivity growth and rising living standards. To measure this labour reallocation process, labour market indicators such as hiring rates and layoff rates are needed. In response to growing demand for subprovincial labour market information and taking advantage of unique administrative datasets, Statistics Canada is producing hiring rates and layoff rates by economic region of residence. This document describes the data sources, conceptual and methodological issues, and other matters pertaining to these two indicators.

    Release date: 2016-06-27
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