Keyword search

Filter results by

Search Help
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Year of publication

1 facets displayed. 1 facets selected.

Geography

2 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.
Sort Help
entries

Results

All (42)

All (42) (0 to 10 of 42 results)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2009002
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This guide presents information of interest to users of data from the Survey of Household Spending, which gathers information on the spending habits, dwelling characteristics and household equipment of Canadian households. The survey covers private households in the 10 provinces. (The territories are surveyed every second year, starting in 1999.)

    This guide includes definitions of survey terms and variables, as well as descriptions of survey methodology and data quality. One section describes the various statistics that can be created using expenditure data (e.g., budget share, market share, aggregates and medians).

    Release date: 2009-12-18

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13-605-X200900211057
    Description:

    With the latest release of the bilateral Purchasing Power Parities estimates for Canada and the U.S., an improved projection methodology for the non-benchmark year has been employed. This note summarizes the new methodology and its rationale.

    Release date: 2009-12-10

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2009058
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the different types of deflators that are used to compare volume estimates of national income and production across countries. It argues that these deflators need to be tailored to the specific income concept used for study. If the potential to spend concept is employed, a purchasing power deflator is needed. If a production based concept is used, a producing power deflator is necessary. The paper argues that present practice produces a hybrid deflator that fails both purposes when terms of trade shifts are large and offers a solution.

    Release date: 2009-12-10

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13-604-M2009062
    Description:

    Statistics Canada produces monthly import and export merchandise trade price indexes. For the majority of these prices, Statistics Canada uses a variety of proxy measures to derive the price index in lieu of collecting observed import and export prices. The ability of these proxy measures to reflect international trade price movements during times of exchange rate volatility is limited. For this reason, the constant dollar trade estimates derived using these proxy price indexes have been refined with constant dollar adjustments following the appreciation of the Canadian exchange rate beginning at the end of 2002. This paper explains the rational and methodology behind these adjustments, as well as the impact on published trade and GDP estimates.

    Release date: 2009-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010920
    Description:

    On behalf of Statistics Canada, I would like to welcome you all, friends and colleagues, to Symposium 2008. This the 24th International Symposium organized by Statistics Canada on survey methodology.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010937
    Description:

    The context of the discussion is the increasing incidence of international surveys, of which one is the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Policy Evaluation Project, which began in 2002. The ITC country surveys are longitudinal, and their aim is to evaluate the effects of policy measures being introduced in various countries under the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. The challenges of organization, data collection and analysis in international surveys are reviewed and illustrated. Analysis is an increasingly important part of the motivation for large scale cross-cultural surveys. The fundamental challenge for analysis is to discern the real response (or lack of response) to policy change, separating it from the effects of data collection mode, differential non-response, external events, time-in-sample, culture, and language. Two problems relevant to statistical analysis are discussed. The first problem is the question of when and how to analyze pooled data from several countries, in order to strengthen conclusions which might be generally valid. While in some cases this seems to be straightforward, there are differing opinions on the extent to which pooling is possible and reasonable. It is suggested that for formal comparisons, random effects models are of conceptual use. The second problem is to find models of measurement across cultures and data collection modes which will enable calibration of continuous, binary and ordinal responses, and produce comparisons from which extraneous effects have been removed. It is noted that hierarchical models provide a natural way of relaxing requirements of model invariance across groups.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010941
    Description:

    Prior to 2004, the design and development of collection functions at Statistics New Zealand (Statistics NZ) was done by a centralised team of data collection methodologists. In 2004, an organisational review considered whether the design and development of these functions was being done in the most effective way. A key issue was the rising costs of surveying as the organisation moved from paper-based data collection to electronic data collection. The review saw some collection functions decentralised. However, a smaller centralised team of data collection methodologists was retained to work with subject matter areas across Statistics NZ.

    This paper will discuss the strategy used by the smaller centralised team of data collection methodologists to support subject matter areas. There are three key themes to the strategy. First, is the development of best practice standards and a central standards repository. Second, is training and introducing knowledge sharing forums. Third, is providing advice and independent review to subject matter areas which design and develop collection instruments.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010954
    Description:

    Over the past year, Statistics Canada has been developing and testing a new way to monitor the performance of interviewers conducting computer-assisted personal interviews (CAPI). A formal process already exists for monitoring centralized telephone interviews. Monitors listen to telephone interviews as they take place to assess the interviewer's performance using pre-defined criteria and provide feedback to the interviewer on what was well done and what needs improvement. For the CAPI program, we have developed and are testing a pilot approach whereby interviews are digitally recorded and later a monitor listens to these recordings to assess the field interviewer's performance and provide feedback in order to help improve the quality of the data. In this paper, we will present an overview of the CAPI monitoring project at Statistics Canada by describing the CAPI monitoring methodology and the plans for implementation.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010955
    Description:

    Survey managers are still discovering the usefulness of digital audio recording for monitoring and managing field staff. Its value so far has been for confirming the authenticity of interviews, detecting curbstoning, offering a concrete basis for feedback on interviewing performance and giving data collection managers an intimate view of in-person interviews. In addition, computer audio-recorded interviewing (CARI) can improve other aspects of survey data quality, offering corroboration or correction of response coding by field staff. Audio recordings may replace or supplement in-field verbatim transcription of free responses, and speech-to-text technology might make this technique more efficient in the future.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010957
    Description:

    Business surveys differ from surveys of populations of individual persons or households in many respects. Two of the most important differences are (a) that respondents in business surveys do not answer questions about characteristics of themselves (such as their experiences, behaviours, attitudes and feelings) but about characteristics of organizations (such as their size, revenues, policies, and strategies) and (b) that they answer these questions as an informant for that organization. Academic business surveys differ from other business surveys, such as of national statistical agencies, in many respects as well. The one most important difference is that academic business surveys usually do not aim at generating descriptive statistics but at testing hypotheses, i.e. relations between variables. Response rates in academic business surveys are very low, which implies a huge risk of non-response bias. Usually no attempt is made to assess the extent of non-response bias and published survey results might, therefore, not be a correct reflection of actual relations within the population, which in return increases the likelihood that the reported test result is not correct.

    This paper provides an analysis of how (the risk of) non-response bias is discussed in research papers published in top management journals. It demonstrates that non-response bias is not assessed to a sufficient degree and that, if attempted at all, correction of non-response bias is difficult or very costly in practice. Three approaches to dealing with this problem are presented and discussed:(a) obtaining data by other means than questionnaires;(b) conducting surveys of very small populations; and(c) conducting surveys of very small samples.

    It will be discussed why these approaches are appropriate means of testing hypotheses in populations. Trade-offs regarding the selection of an approach will be discussed as well.

    Release date: 2009-12-03
Data (0)

Data (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Analysis (33)

Analysis (33) (10 to 20 of 33 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010988
    Description:

    Online data collection emerged in 1995 as an alternative approach for conducting certain types of consumer research studies and has grown in 2008. This growth has been primarily in studies where non-probability sampling methods are used. While online sampling has gained acceptance for some research applications, serious questions remain concerning online samples' suitability for research requiring precise volumetric measurement of the behavior of the U.S. population, particularly their travel behavior. This paper reviews literature and compares results from studies using probability samples and online samples to understand whether results differ from the two sampling approaches. The paper also demonstrates that online samples underestimate critical types of travel even after demographic and geographic weighting.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010989
    Description:

    At first sight, web surveys seem to be an interesting and attractive means of data collection. They provide simple, cheap and fast access to a large group of people. However, web surveys also suffer from methodological problems. Outcomes of web surveys may be severally biased, particularly if self-selection of respondents is applied instead of proper probability sampling. Under-coverage is also a serious problem. This raises the question whether web surveys can be used for data collection in official statistics. This paper addresses the problems under-coverage and self-selection in web surveys, and attempts to describe how Internet data collection can be incorporated in normal data collection practices of official statistics.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010994
    Description:

    The growing difficulty of reaching respondents has a general impact on non-response in telephone surveys, especially those that use random digit dialling (RDD), such as the General Social Survey (GSS). The GSS is an annual multipurpose survey with 25,000 respondents. Its aim is to monitor the characteristics of and major changes in Canada's social structure. GSS Cycle 21 (2007) was about the family, social support and retirement. Its target population consisted of persons aged 45 and over living in the 10 Canadian provinces. For more effective coverage, part of the sample was taken from a follow-up with the respondents of GSS Cycle 20 (2006), which was on family transitions. The remainder was a new RDD sample. In this paper, we describe the survey's sampling plan and the random digit dialling method used. Then we discuss the challenges of calculating the non-response rate in an RDD survey that targets a subset of a population, for which the in-scope population must be estimated or modelled. This is done primarily through the use of paradata. The methodology used in GSS Cycle 21 is presented in detail.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010996
    Description:

    In recent years, the use of paradata has become increasingly important to the management of collection activities at Statistics Canada. Particular attention has been paid to social surveys conducted over the phone, like the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID). For recent SLID data collections, the number of call attempts was capped at 40 calls. Investigations of the SLID Blaise Transaction History (BTH) files were undertaken to assess the impact of the cap on calls.The purpose of the first study was to inform decisions as to the capping of call attempts, the second study focused on the nature of nonresponse given the limit of 40 attempts.

    The use of paradata as auxiliary information for studying and accounting for survey nonresponse was also examined. Nonresponse adjustment models using different paradata variables gathered at the collection stage were compared to the current models based on available auxiliary information from the Labour Force Survey.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010998
    Description:

    Businesses which have not responded to a mail survey are generally subject to intensive follow up (IFU) by telephone or other means to obtain a response. As this contact is expensive, strategies are needed to optimise the approach to conducting calls for IFU purpose.

    This paper presents results from an investigation conducted into the number and type of IFU contacts made for business surveys at the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS). The paper compares the amount of effort expended in IFU compared to the response rates and contribution to key estimates for these surveys, and discusses possible uses of this type of information to make more optimal use of resources.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800011000
    Description:

    The present report reviews the results of a mailing experiment that took place within a large scale demonstration project. A postcard and stickers were sent to a random group of project participants in the period between a contact call and a survey. The researchers hypothesized that, because of the additional mailing (the treatment), the response rates to the upcoming survey would increase. There was, however, no difference between the response rates of the treatment group that received the additional mailing and the control group. In the specific circumstances of the mailing experiment, sending project participants a postcard and stickers as a reminder of the upcoming survey and of their participation in the pilot project was not an efficient way to increase response rates.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800011002
    Description:

    Based on a representative sample of the Canadian population, this article quantifies the bias resulting from the use of self-reported rather than directly measured height, weight and body mass index (BMI). Associations between BMI categories and selected health conditions are compared to see if the misclassification resulting from the use of self-reported data alters associations between obesity and obesity-related health conditions. The analysis is based on 4,567 respondents to the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) who, during a face-to-face interview, provided self-reported values for height and weight and were then measured by trained interviewers. Based on self-reported data, a substantial proportion of individuals with excess body weight were erroneously placed in lower BMI categories. This misclassification resulted in elevated associations between overweight/obesity and morbidity.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800011005
    Description:

    In 2006 Statistics New Zealand started developing a strategy aimed at coordinating new and existing initiatives focused on respondent load. The development of the strategy lasted more than a year and the resulting commitment to reduce respondent load has meant that the organisation has had to confront a number of issues that impact on the way we conduct our surveys.

    The next challenge for Statistics NZ is the transition from the project based initiatives outlined in the strategy to managing load on an ongoing basis.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800011006
    Description:

    The Office for National Statistics (ONS) has an obligation to measure and annually report on the burden that it places on businesses participating in its surveys. There are also targets for reduction of costs to businesses complying with government regulation as part of the 2005 Administrative Burdens Reduction Project (ABRP) coordinated by the Better Regulation Executive (BRE).

    Respondent burden is measured by looking at the economic costs to businesses. Over time the methodology for measuring this economic cost has changed with the most recent method being the development and piloting of a Standard Cost Model (SCM) approach.

    The SCM is commonly used in Europe and is focused on measuring objective administrative burdens for all government requests for information e.g. tax returns, VAT, as well as survey participation. This method was not therefore specifically developed to measure statistical response burden. The SCM methodology is activity-based, meaning that the costs and time taken to fulfil requirements are broken down by activity.

    The SCM approach generally collects data using face-to-face interviews. The approach is therefore labour intensive both from a collection and analysis perspective but provides in depth information. The approach developed and piloted at ONS uses paper self-completion questionnaires.

    The objective of this paper is to provide an overview of respondent burden reporting and targets; and to review the different methodologies that ONS has used to measure respondent burden from the perspectives of sampling, data collection, analysis and usability.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800011007
    Description:

    The Questionnaire Design Resource Centre (QDRC) is the focal point of expertise at Statistics Canada for questionnaire design and evaluation. As it stands now, cognitive interviewing to test questionnaires is most often done near the end of the questionnaire development process. By participating earlier in the questionnaire development process, the QDRC could test new survey topics using more adaptive cognitive methods for each step of the questionnaire development process. This would necessitate fewer participants for each phase of testing, thus reducing the cost and the recruitment challenge.

    Based on a review of the literature and Statistics Canada's existing questionnaire evaluation projects, this paper will describe how the QDRC could help clients in making appropriate improvements to their questionnaire in a timely manner.

    Release date: 2009-12-03
Reference (9)

Reference (9) ((9 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2009002
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This guide presents information of interest to users of data from the Survey of Household Spending, which gathers information on the spending habits, dwelling characteristics and household equipment of Canadian households. The survey covers private households in the 10 provinces. (The territories are surveyed every second year, starting in 1999.)

    This guide includes definitions of survey terms and variables, as well as descriptions of survey methodology and data quality. One section describes the various statistics that can be created using expenditure data (e.g., budget share, market share, aggregates and medians).

    Release date: 2009-12-18

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13-605-X200900211057
    Description:

    With the latest release of the bilateral Purchasing Power Parities estimates for Canada and the U.S., an improved projection methodology for the non-benchmark year has been employed. This note summarizes the new methodology and its rationale.

    Release date: 2009-12-10

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13-604-M2009062
    Description:

    Statistics Canada produces monthly import and export merchandise trade price indexes. For the majority of these prices, Statistics Canada uses a variety of proxy measures to derive the price index in lieu of collecting observed import and export prices. The ability of these proxy measures to reflect international trade price movements during times of exchange rate volatility is limited. For this reason, the constant dollar trade estimates derived using these proxy price indexes have been refined with constant dollar adjustments following the appreciation of the Canadian exchange rate beginning at the end of 2002. This paper explains the rational and methodology behind these adjustments, as well as the impact on published trade and GDP estimates.

    Release date: 2009-12-04

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89-634-X2009008
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) is a parent-reported instrument designed to provide information on children's behaviours and relationships. The SDQ consists of 25 items which are grouped into five subscales: (1) pro-social, (2) inattention-hyperactivity, (3) emotional symptoms, (4) conduct problems, and (5) peer problems. The SDQ was used to provide information on children aged 2 to 5 years in the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS). Though validated on general populations, the constructs of the SDQ have not been validated for off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit children in Canada. The first objective of this evaluation is to examine if the five subscales of the SDQ demonstrate construct validity and reliability for off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit children. The second objective is to examine if an alternative set of subscales, using the 25 SDQ items, may be more valid and reliable for off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit children.

    Release date: 2009-11-25

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 16-001-M2009008
    Description:

    In 2008, Statistics Canada conducted the first Agricultural Water Use Survey. This pilot survey is part of the Canadian Environment Sustainability Indicators initiative and collects information on volumes of water used for irrigation, irrigated areas, irrigation practices and the quality of water used for agricultural purposes. This technical paper describes the methodology used for the pilot survey and includes recommendations for future cycles of the survey. The validation process seems to indicate that the method used to estimate the volumes of water used and the irrigated areas calculated underestimates the results. The report gives recommendations to minimize this bias in the next iterations of the survey. First, it is recommended to simplify the level of information collected by the survey; to review the sampling methodology; and to examine other means of collecting information on volumes of water used for irrigation. This pilot version of the survey remains a reliable source for consistent data on agricultural water use.

    Release date: 2009-06-26

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 16-001-M2009007
    Description:

    In this paper, we present the methodology developed by Statistics Canada to calculate the average annual water yield for Canada. Water yield, for the purposes of this paper, is defined as the amount of freshwater derived from unregulated flow (m3 s-1) measurements for a given geographic area over a defined period of time. The methodology is applied to the 1971 to 2000 time period.

    This research was conducted to fill data gaps in Statistics Canada's water statistics program. These gaps exist because estimates of freshwater flow for Canada have not been calculated regularly and have been produced using a variety of methods that do not necessarily generate comparable results. The methodology developed in this study produced results that are coherent through space and time. These results will be used in the future to investigate changes in water yield on a more disaggregated basis.

    To achieve the water yield estimate a database of natural streamflow observations from 1971 to 2000 was compiled. The streamflow values were then converted to a runoff depth and interpolated using ordinary kriging to produce spatial estimates of runoff. The spatial estimates were then scaled to create a National estimate of water yield as a thirty-year average. The methodology and results were then validated using a stability analysis and several techniques involving uncertainty. The result of the methodology indicates that the thirty-year average water yield for Canada is 3435 km3.

    Release date: 2009-06-01

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 82-622-X2008003
    Description:

    Since 2007/2008, Statistics Canada has centred analysis of data holdings related to health as well as our program of dissemination of health research within the new Health Information and Research Division (HIRD).

    The new division has launched a comprehensive approach to analytical planning including environmental scanning and consultation; establishment of strategic multi-year priorities for health research at Statistics Canada; a process of project selection and review that ensures that analytical effort addresses our priorities; metrics to measure our adherence to priorities and the impact of our analytical effort; and communication and dissemination of analytical plans.

    This multi-year analytical plan identifies the key high-level priority areas for Statistics Canada's investment in health research for 2008/2009 to 2010/2011, and serves as a blueprint for subsequent operational research planning.

    Release date: 2009-01-30

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89-637-X2008003
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This guide is intended to help data users understand the concepts and methods used in the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS), which was conducted from October 2006 to March 2007.

    Technical details on sampling, processing and data quality are included in this guide. Further, the guide explains the relationship between the APS and the 2006 Census and cautions users as to important differences in the data produced from these two sources. Appendix 1 provides a list of communities for which data are available while Appendix 2 contains a glossary of terms that relate to the APS. Answers to some frequently asked questions are provided in Appendix 3. Links to the 2006 APS questionnaires are found in Appendix 4.

    Release date: 2009-01-16

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 91F0015M2008010
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The objective of this study is to examine the feasibility of using provincial and territorial health care files of new registrants as an independent measure of preliminary inter-provincial and inter-territorial migration. The study aims at measuring the conceptual and quantifiable differences between this data source and our present source of the Canada Revenue Agency's Canadian Child Tax Benefit.

    Criteria were established to assess the quality and appropriateness of these provincial/territorial health care records as a proxy for our migration estimates: coverage, consistency, timeliness, reliability, level of detail, uniformity and accuracy.

    Based on the present analysis, the paper finds that these data do not ameliorate the estimates and would not be suitable at this time as a measure of inter-provincial/territorial migration. These Medicare data though are an important independent data source that can be used for quality evaluation.

    Release date: 2009-01-13
Date modified: