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All (17) (0 to 10 of 17 results)

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020108429
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Adult Correctional Services Survey (ACSS) collects annual aggregate data from all jurisdictions on the delivery of adult correctional services from both the provincial, territorial and federal correctional systems. Key themes include the average daily counts of adults in custodial facilities, including remand, as well as monthly counts of probationers; and new admissions (commencements) to correctional programs of sentenced custody, probation, conditional sentences and other community-based programs. The survey also captures information on conditional releases to the community, including parole and statutory release. In addition, the survey collects information on the financial and human resources involved in the delivery of adult correctional services. While trends are presented for the key units of count, the reference period for this release is 2000-2001.

    Release date: 2002-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020098428
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    The Juristat publication, "Pilot analysis of recidivism among convicted youth and young adults, 1999/00," summarizes trends from the provincial/territorial courts across Canada that provided data to the Adult Criminal Court Survey (ACCS) and the Youth Court Survey (YCS). This report attempts to gauge the prevalence of recidivism in young adults by examining the conviction histories of young adults convicted in Canadian criminal courts in 1999-2000. It also examines the transition from youth to adult offending, including patterns of re-offending, differences in conviction histories by age of onset and the impact of conviction history on court sentencing.

    Release date: 2002-10-23

  • Articles and reports: 21-601-M2002057
    Description:

    This study provides a financial profile of Canadian food industry corporations that were acquired during the period 1996 to 1998.

    Release date: 2002-10-16

  • Table: 85-226-X
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This publication presents data on young offender admissions to custody and community services, with breakdowns by custody (remand, secure, open) and probation, and key case characteristics, such as age, sex, Aboriginal/non-Aboriginal status and most serious offence. In addition, it includes data pertaining to releases from remand, secure custody and open custody, by sex and time served. These breakdowns are presented at the national and provincial/territorial levels.

    Data presented in this publication are drawn from two primary sources: 1) The Youth Custody and Community Services (YCCS) Survey. The objective of this survey is to collect and analyse information on the application of dispositions under the Young Offenders Act from provincial and territorial agencies responsible for youth corrections and programs. 2) The Youth Key Indicator Report (YKIR). This survey measures the average counts of youth in custody (remand, secure and open) and on probation. The YKIR describes average daily counts (caseload), which measure the volume of offenders held in custody or on probation on an average day at month-end. This information also provides an examination of youth incarceration and probation rates in Canada.

    Release date: 2002-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20010016266
    Description:

    This paper discusses in detail issues dealing with the technical aspects of designing and conducting surveys. It is intended for an audience of survey methodologists.

    The key measure of Census quality is the level of response achieved. In recent censuses around the world, this level has been in the high nineties percentage range. This was also true of the 1991 Census in Britain (98%). However, what was particularly noticeable about this Census was the differential response rate and the difficulty in effectively measuring this rate. The United Kingdom set up the One Number Census program in order to research and develop a more effective methodology to measure and account for under-enumeration in the 2001 Census. The key element in this process is the Census Coverage Survey - a significantly larger and redesigned post-enumeration survey.

    This paper describes the planning and design of the Census Coverage Survey with particular emphasis on the implementation of the proposed field methodology. It also provides a high-level overview of the success of this survey.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20010016274
    Description:

    This paper discusses in detail issues dealing with the technical aspects of designing and conducting surveys. It is intended for an audience of survey methodologists.

    Since the late 1950s, the probability surveys in the manufacturing sector within the Manufacturing and Construction Division (MCD) had been almost exclusively selected by using Poisson sampling with unit probabilities assigned proportionate to some measure of size. Poisson sampling has the advantage of simplistic variance calculations. Its disadvantage is that the sample size is a random variable, thus adding an additional (and usually positive) component of variance to the survey estimates. In the 1998 survey year, MCD initiated the use of the modified Tillé sampling procedure in some of its surveys. This sampling procedure is used when there is unequal probability of selection and the sample size is fixed. This paper briefly describes this modified procedure and some of its features, and for a variety of dissimilar surveys, itcontrasts variance results obtained using the Tillé procedure to those resulting from the earlier Poisson procedure.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20010016281
    Description:

    This paper discusses in detail issues dealing with the technical aspects of designing and conducting surveys. It is intended for an audience of survey methodologists.

    Methodology for estimating the sampling error of the non-seasonally adjusted estimate of level of the Index of Production (IoP) has previously been developed using Taylor linearization and parametric bootstrap methods, with both producing comparable results. From the study, it was considered that the parametric bootstrap approach would be more practical to implement. This paper describes the methodology that is being developed to estimate the sampling error of the non-seasonally adjusted IoP change using the parametric bootstrap method, along with the data that are needed from the contributing surveys, the assumptions made, and the practical problems encountered during development.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20010016301
    Description:

    This paper discusses in detail issues dealing with the technical aspects of designing and conducting surveys. It is intended for an audience of survey methodologists.

    The Integrated Metadatabase is a corporate repository of information for each of Statistics Canada's surveys. The information stored in the Integrated Metadatabase includes a description of data sources and methodology, definitions of concepts and variables measured, and indicators of data quality. It provides an effective vehicle for communicating data quality to data users. Its coverage of Statistics Canada's data holdings is exhaustive, the provided information on data quality complies with the Policy on Informing Users of Data Quality and Methodology, and it is presented in a consistent and systematic fashion.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002185
    Geography: Canada, Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This paper examines whether long-run labour market outcomes depend on residential environment among adults who grew up in subsidized housing in Toronto. The housing program in Toronto provides a full spectrum of neighbourhood quality types to measure outcome differences, and offers a real-life example of large scale neighbourhood quality reform. A primary advantage with this approach is that, conditional on participation in public housing, residential choice is substantially limited. Families that applied for public housing could not specify which project they wished to be housed in and were constrained to what was offered based on availability at the time they applied and by family size. Unlike previous housing mobility experiments, the availability of administrative tax records are used to measure both short and long run outcomes. The results indicate almost no difference in educational attainment, adult earnings, income, and social assistance participation between children from different public housing types. Average outcomes, estimated wage distributions, and outcome correlations among unrelated project neighbours show no significant neighbourhood impact. In contrast, family differences seem to matter a great deal.

    Release date: 2002-06-03

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002189
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Understanding the importance of the dynamic entry process in the Canadian economy involves measuring size of entry. The main purpose of this paper is to summarize the information we have on the amount of entry in Canada.

    The paper also fulfils another purpose. Some studies have focused on cross-country comparisons (Geroski and Schwalbach 1991; OECD 2001). Interpretation of the results of these studies is difficult unless methodological issues regarding how entry is measured are addressed. Without an understanding of the extent to which different databases produce different results, international comparisons are difficult to evaluate. Cross-country comparisons that are derived from extremely different data sources may be misleading because of the lack of comparability.

    Since there is more than one reliable database that can be used to estimate entry in Canada, this paper asks how measured entry rates vary across different Canadian databases. By examining the difference in entry rates produced by these databases, we provide an estimate of the range or confidence interval that should be used in evaluating whether there are real differences in measured entry rates across countries. We also offer guidance as to the questions that should be asked about the databases used by researchers who conduct international studies. Finally, we make suggestions as to areas of comparison on which international studies should focus.

    Release date: 2002-05-29
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Table: 85-226-X
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This publication presents data on young offender admissions to custody and community services, with breakdowns by custody (remand, secure, open) and probation, and key case characteristics, such as age, sex, Aboriginal/non-Aboriginal status and most serious offence. In addition, it includes data pertaining to releases from remand, secure custody and open custody, by sex and time served. These breakdowns are presented at the national and provincial/territorial levels.

    Data presented in this publication are drawn from two primary sources: 1) The Youth Custody and Community Services (YCCS) Survey. The objective of this survey is to collect and analyse information on the application of dispositions under the Young Offenders Act from provincial and territorial agencies responsible for youth corrections and programs. 2) The Youth Key Indicator Report (YKIR). This survey measures the average counts of youth in custody (remand, secure and open) and on probation. The YKIR describes average daily counts (caseload), which measure the volume of offenders held in custody or on probation on an average day at month-end. This information also provides an examination of youth incarceration and probation rates in Canada.

    Release date: 2002-10-09
Analysis (16)

Analysis (16) (0 to 10 of 16 results)

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020108429
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Adult Correctional Services Survey (ACSS) collects annual aggregate data from all jurisdictions on the delivery of adult correctional services from both the provincial, territorial and federal correctional systems. Key themes include the average daily counts of adults in custodial facilities, including remand, as well as monthly counts of probationers; and new admissions (commencements) to correctional programs of sentenced custody, probation, conditional sentences and other community-based programs. The survey also captures information on conditional releases to the community, including parole and statutory release. In addition, the survey collects information on the financial and human resources involved in the delivery of adult correctional services. While trends are presented for the key units of count, the reference period for this release is 2000-2001.

    Release date: 2002-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020098428
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    The Juristat publication, "Pilot analysis of recidivism among convicted youth and young adults, 1999/00," summarizes trends from the provincial/territorial courts across Canada that provided data to the Adult Criminal Court Survey (ACCS) and the Youth Court Survey (YCS). This report attempts to gauge the prevalence of recidivism in young adults by examining the conviction histories of young adults convicted in Canadian criminal courts in 1999-2000. It also examines the transition from youth to adult offending, including patterns of re-offending, differences in conviction histories by age of onset and the impact of conviction history on court sentencing.

    Release date: 2002-10-23

  • Articles and reports: 21-601-M2002057
    Description:

    This study provides a financial profile of Canadian food industry corporations that were acquired during the period 1996 to 1998.

    Release date: 2002-10-16

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20010016266
    Description:

    This paper discusses in detail issues dealing with the technical aspects of designing and conducting surveys. It is intended for an audience of survey methodologists.

    The key measure of Census quality is the level of response achieved. In recent censuses around the world, this level has been in the high nineties percentage range. This was also true of the 1991 Census in Britain (98%). However, what was particularly noticeable about this Census was the differential response rate and the difficulty in effectively measuring this rate. The United Kingdom set up the One Number Census program in order to research and develop a more effective methodology to measure and account for under-enumeration in the 2001 Census. The key element in this process is the Census Coverage Survey - a significantly larger and redesigned post-enumeration survey.

    This paper describes the planning and design of the Census Coverage Survey with particular emphasis on the implementation of the proposed field methodology. It also provides a high-level overview of the success of this survey.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20010016274
    Description:

    This paper discusses in detail issues dealing with the technical aspects of designing and conducting surveys. It is intended for an audience of survey methodologists.

    Since the late 1950s, the probability surveys in the manufacturing sector within the Manufacturing and Construction Division (MCD) had been almost exclusively selected by using Poisson sampling with unit probabilities assigned proportionate to some measure of size. Poisson sampling has the advantage of simplistic variance calculations. Its disadvantage is that the sample size is a random variable, thus adding an additional (and usually positive) component of variance to the survey estimates. In the 1998 survey year, MCD initiated the use of the modified Tillé sampling procedure in some of its surveys. This sampling procedure is used when there is unequal probability of selection and the sample size is fixed. This paper briefly describes this modified procedure and some of its features, and for a variety of dissimilar surveys, itcontrasts variance results obtained using the Tillé procedure to those resulting from the earlier Poisson procedure.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20010016281
    Description:

    This paper discusses in detail issues dealing with the technical aspects of designing and conducting surveys. It is intended for an audience of survey methodologists.

    Methodology for estimating the sampling error of the non-seasonally adjusted estimate of level of the Index of Production (IoP) has previously been developed using Taylor linearization and parametric bootstrap methods, with both producing comparable results. From the study, it was considered that the parametric bootstrap approach would be more practical to implement. This paper describes the methodology that is being developed to estimate the sampling error of the non-seasonally adjusted IoP change using the parametric bootstrap method, along with the data that are needed from the contributing surveys, the assumptions made, and the practical problems encountered during development.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20010016301
    Description:

    This paper discusses in detail issues dealing with the technical aspects of designing and conducting surveys. It is intended for an audience of survey methodologists.

    The Integrated Metadatabase is a corporate repository of information for each of Statistics Canada's surveys. The information stored in the Integrated Metadatabase includes a description of data sources and methodology, definitions of concepts and variables measured, and indicators of data quality. It provides an effective vehicle for communicating data quality to data users. Its coverage of Statistics Canada's data holdings is exhaustive, the provided information on data quality complies with the Policy on Informing Users of Data Quality and Methodology, and it is presented in a consistent and systematic fashion.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002185
    Geography: Canada, Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This paper examines whether long-run labour market outcomes depend on residential environment among adults who grew up in subsidized housing in Toronto. The housing program in Toronto provides a full spectrum of neighbourhood quality types to measure outcome differences, and offers a real-life example of large scale neighbourhood quality reform. A primary advantage with this approach is that, conditional on participation in public housing, residential choice is substantially limited. Families that applied for public housing could not specify which project they wished to be housed in and were constrained to what was offered based on availability at the time they applied and by family size. Unlike previous housing mobility experiments, the availability of administrative tax records are used to measure both short and long run outcomes. The results indicate almost no difference in educational attainment, adult earnings, income, and social assistance participation between children from different public housing types. Average outcomes, estimated wage distributions, and outcome correlations among unrelated project neighbours show no significant neighbourhood impact. In contrast, family differences seem to matter a great deal.

    Release date: 2002-06-03

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002189
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Understanding the importance of the dynamic entry process in the Canadian economy involves measuring size of entry. The main purpose of this paper is to summarize the information we have on the amount of entry in Canada.

    The paper also fulfils another purpose. Some studies have focused on cross-country comparisons (Geroski and Schwalbach 1991; OECD 2001). Interpretation of the results of these studies is difficult unless methodological issues regarding how entry is measured are addressed. Without an understanding of the extent to which different databases produce different results, international comparisons are difficult to evaluate. Cross-country comparisons that are derived from extremely different data sources may be misleading because of the lack of comparability.

    Since there is more than one reliable database that can be used to estimate entry in Canada, this paper asks how measured entry rates vary across different Canadian databases. By examining the difference in entry rates produced by these databases, we provide an estimate of the range or confidence interval that should be used in evaluating whether there are real differences in measured entry rates across countries. We also offer guidance as to the questions that should be asked about the databases used by researchers who conduct international studies. Finally, we make suggestions as to areas of comparison on which international studies should focus.

    Release date: 2002-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002168
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the factors contributing to the adoption of advanced technologies in the Canadian food-processing sector. The numbers of technologies used by a plant is found to be highly correlated with expected gains in firm performance. The benefits of enhanced food safety and quality, as well as productivity improvements, are closely associated with technology use. Impediments that negatively affect technology use include software costs, problems with external financing, lack of cash flow for financing, and internal management problems. Even after accounting for the different benefits and costs associated with technology adoption, the numbers of advanced technologies that are adopted are found to be greater in larger plants, in foreign-controlled plants, in plants that engage in both primary and secondary processing, and in the dairy, fruit and vegetable and "other" food product industries.

    Release date: 2002-05-28
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