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  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010118397
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This Juristat examines how Canadian crime rates compare to those in the United States. Using police-reported crime data, the analysis focuses on seven comparable offences: homicide, aggravated assault, robbery, break and enter, motor vehicle theft, theft, and arson. As well, three comparable offences were compared using charge/arrest data, including drug violations, impaired driving, and prostitution. Crime rate comparisons are presented at the national, regional, and metropolitan levels. This is a special topic Juristat of great interest to those working in the criminal justice system, as well as researchers, policy makers, and anyone who is interested in cross-national crime comparisons.

    Release date: 2001-12-18

  • Journals and periodicals: 56-506-X
    Description:

    Information and communications technologies in Canada is designed to profile the growth and development of the Canadian information and communications technologies (ICT) sector. The publication provides a statistical overview of the ICT sector on the basis of key economic variables, including production, employment, international trade, revenue and research and development expenditures.

    Statistics Canada's first quantification of the ICT sector appeared in the compendium publication entitled Networked Canada: beyond the information highway, catalogue no. 56-504-XIE. This publication updates these estimates with the most recent data, while providing improved industrial coverage and in-depth analysis of Canada's ICT sector.

    Many different data sources have been used throughout the project, and while all efforts have been made to maximize the amount of data available, it has not been possible in all instances to consistently report for all ICT industries and all relevant variables. The conversion to the new North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) has largely contributed to these difficulties, and it is expected that a greater range of data will be available once all of the survey programs begin reporting on the basis of this new industry classification.

    Release date: 2001-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001178
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The school performance of the children of immigrants in the Canadian school system is analyzed using data from the first three waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY). School performance is measured in terms of ability at reading, writing, mathematics and overall aptitude. The parents' and teachers' assessments of the children's performances are used, as are the results of formal testing. On average, children of immigrants generally do at least as well as the children of the Canadian-born along each dimension of school performance. The children of immigrant parents whose first language is either English or French have especially high outcomes. The children of other immigrant parents have lower performance in reading, writing and composition but their performance in mathematics is comparable to that of the children of Canadian-born parents. It is also found that with more years in the Canadian education system, the performance of these children in reading, writing and mathematics improves and is equal to or greater than the performance of the children of Canadian-born parents by age thirteen in virtually all areas of performance.

    Release date: 2001-11-14

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010098395
    Geography: Province or territory, Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    The 2000 police-reported statistics indicate that the overall crime rate in Canada decreased for the ninth consecutive year and is at its lowest point since 1978. In addition, data from studies such as the 1999 General Social Survey (GSS) suggest that many Canadians perceive crime as having stabilized over the past five years and feel less fearful of being a victim of crime in their neighbourhoods. Despite these positive indicators, the violent crime rate increased by 3% in 2000, the first increase in seven years. This report examines trends and characteristics for the most serious violent crime – homicide.

    Release date: 2001-10-31

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2001003
    Description:

    This document provides a detailed description of the methodology of the Survey of Household Spending. Topics covered include: target population; sample design; data collection; data processing; weighting and estimation; estimation of sampling error; and data suppression and confidentiality.

    Release date: 2001-10-15

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0026M2001003
    Description:

    Initial results from the Survey of Financial Security (SFS), which provides information on the net worth of Canadians, were released on March 15 2001, in The daily. The survey collected information on the value of the financial and non-financial assets owned by each family unit and on the amount of their debt.

    Statistics Canada is currently refining this initial estimate of net worth by adding to it an estimate of the value of benefits accrued in employer pension plans. This is an important addition to any asset and debt survey as, for many family units, it is likely to be one of the largest assets. With the aging of the population, information on pension accumulations is greatly needed to better understand the financial situation of those nearing retirement. These updated estimates of the Survey of Financial Security will be released in late fall 2001.

    The process for estimating the value of employer pension plan benefits is a complex one. This document describes the methodology for estimating that value, for the following groups: a) persons who belonged to an RPP at the time of the survey (referred to as current plan members); b) persons who had previously belonged to an RPP and either left the money in the plan or transferred it to a new plan; c) persons who are receiving RPP benefits.

    This methodology was proposed by Hubert Frenken and Michael Cohen. The former has many years of experience with Statistics Canada working with data on employer pension plans; the latter is a principal with the actuarial consulting firm William M. Mercer. Earlier this year, Statistics Canada carried out a public consultation on the proposed methodology. This report includes updates made as a result of feedback received from data users.

    Release date: 2001-09-05

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010078393
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Research studies have found a connection between spousal violence and separation, particularly for women. Using data from the 1999 General Social Survey, the 1993 Violence Against Women Survey, the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey and the Homicide Survey, this Juristat investigates the prevalence, nature and severity of violence that occurs following the breakdown of a marital union.

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20000005748
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Several different analyses have considered the impact of family and demographic change on the economic conditions affecting children (Dooley, 1988, 1991; McQuillan, 1992; Picot and Myles, 1996). The present study updates this reserach to 1997, while shifting the emphasis to families with very young children.

    Release date: 2001-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2000003
    Description:

    In the spring of 1999, the Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division of Statistics Canada (SIEID) decided to review the methods it uses to estimate Higher Education R&D Expenditures (HERD) and Health Gross Expenditures on R&D (Health GERD). The manner in which research is performed and funded in Canadian universities and research hospitals has evolved in recent years, and current methodologies may not take these changes into account. By improving HERD, the health GERD estimates will also benefit. It may be possible to improve them yet again by building upon recent work at Statistics Canada on biotechnology R&D in Canadian Industry.

    In September 1999, an initial study and its recommendations generated a positive reaction from a group of professionals in the university and health research fields. SIEID then created a Working Group and hired a facilitator to examine current estimation methods, to recommend revisions where appropriate, and to produce a framework for an improved program in this area. This document is the final report written by the facilitator, Mireille Brochu.

    Release date: 2001-05-23

  • Thematic map: 16F0025X
    Description:

    This Statistics Canada publication is a collection of five annotated maps and graphs that describe the geographic distribution of manure in Canada by river basin. The amount of manure produced is estimated along with some of the major substances found in manure: (i) nitrogen, (ii) phosphorus, (iii) total coliform bacteria and (iv) fecal coliform bacteria.

    The maps and figures presented in this report indicate that there are geographic areas in Canada characterized by higher levels of total livestock manure and related production of nitrogen, phosphorus and bacteria. Areas that repeatedly showed the highest levels were found in central and southern Alberta, southern Manitoba, southern Ontario, southeastern Quebec, parts of Prince Edward Island, the west Fraser River area in southern British Columbia and an area near Wolfville and Kentville, Nova Scotia.

    Release date: 2001-02-22
Data (2)

Data (2) ((2 results))

  • Thematic map: 16F0025X
    Description:

    This Statistics Canada publication is a collection of five annotated maps and graphs that describe the geographic distribution of manure in Canada by river basin. The amount of manure produced is estimated along with some of the major substances found in manure: (i) nitrogen, (ii) phosphorus, (iii) total coliform bacteria and (iv) fecal coliform bacteria.

    The maps and figures presented in this report indicate that there are geographic areas in Canada characterized by higher levels of total livestock manure and related production of nitrogen, phosphorus and bacteria. Areas that repeatedly showed the highest levels were found in central and southern Alberta, southern Manitoba, southern Ontario, southeastern Quebec, parts of Prince Edward Island, the west Fraser River area in southern British Columbia and an area near Wolfville and Kentville, Nova Scotia.

    Release date: 2001-02-22

  • Table: 63-236-X
    Description:

    This publication presents data on revenue and expense items from wholesalers and retailers by trade group and by province. There are 16 retail trade groups and 11 wholesale trade groups. Profiles of the retail trade groups are provided for each individual province/territory and are comprised of: number of locations, total operating revenues, cost of goods sold, gross margin and employee earnings and benefits. At the national level for each retail trade group are the following performance indicators: sales to inventory, cost of goods sold to inventory, gross margin and profit margin. Also provided at the national level are total operating revenues, number of locations for independent and for chain stores, the number of retail businesses by trade and total operating revenue by SIC (4 digit when possible).

    The 11 wholesale trade groups, plus grain and petroleum products, are profiled for each individual province/territory giving: number of locations, total operating revenues, cost of goods sold, gross margin and employee earnings and benefits. Performance indicators by trade group at the national level including sales to inventory, cost of goods sold to inventory, gross margin and profit margin are provided. Total operating revenue at the national level by Standard Industrial Classification and by class of customer and trade group are also provided.

    Release date: 2001-02-05
Analysis (10)

Analysis (10) ((10 results))

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010118397
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This Juristat examines how Canadian crime rates compare to those in the United States. Using police-reported crime data, the analysis focuses on seven comparable offences: homicide, aggravated assault, robbery, break and enter, motor vehicle theft, theft, and arson. As well, three comparable offences were compared using charge/arrest data, including drug violations, impaired driving, and prostitution. Crime rate comparisons are presented at the national, regional, and metropolitan levels. This is a special topic Juristat of great interest to those working in the criminal justice system, as well as researchers, policy makers, and anyone who is interested in cross-national crime comparisons.

    Release date: 2001-12-18

  • Journals and periodicals: 56-506-X
    Description:

    Information and communications technologies in Canada is designed to profile the growth and development of the Canadian information and communications technologies (ICT) sector. The publication provides a statistical overview of the ICT sector on the basis of key economic variables, including production, employment, international trade, revenue and research and development expenditures.

    Statistics Canada's first quantification of the ICT sector appeared in the compendium publication entitled Networked Canada: beyond the information highway, catalogue no. 56-504-XIE. This publication updates these estimates with the most recent data, while providing improved industrial coverage and in-depth analysis of Canada's ICT sector.

    Many different data sources have been used throughout the project, and while all efforts have been made to maximize the amount of data available, it has not been possible in all instances to consistently report for all ICT industries and all relevant variables. The conversion to the new North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) has largely contributed to these difficulties, and it is expected that a greater range of data will be available once all of the survey programs begin reporting on the basis of this new industry classification.

    Release date: 2001-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001178
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The school performance of the children of immigrants in the Canadian school system is analyzed using data from the first three waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY). School performance is measured in terms of ability at reading, writing, mathematics and overall aptitude. The parents' and teachers' assessments of the children's performances are used, as are the results of formal testing. On average, children of immigrants generally do at least as well as the children of the Canadian-born along each dimension of school performance. The children of immigrant parents whose first language is either English or French have especially high outcomes. The children of other immigrant parents have lower performance in reading, writing and composition but their performance in mathematics is comparable to that of the children of Canadian-born parents. It is also found that with more years in the Canadian education system, the performance of these children in reading, writing and mathematics improves and is equal to or greater than the performance of the children of Canadian-born parents by age thirteen in virtually all areas of performance.

    Release date: 2001-11-14

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010098395
    Geography: Province or territory, Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    The 2000 police-reported statistics indicate that the overall crime rate in Canada decreased for the ninth consecutive year and is at its lowest point since 1978. In addition, data from studies such as the 1999 General Social Survey (GSS) suggest that many Canadians perceive crime as having stabilized over the past five years and feel less fearful of being a victim of crime in their neighbourhoods. Despite these positive indicators, the violent crime rate increased by 3% in 2000, the first increase in seven years. This report examines trends and characteristics for the most serious violent crime – homicide.

    Release date: 2001-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010078393
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Research studies have found a connection between spousal violence and separation, particularly for women. Using data from the 1999 General Social Survey, the 1993 Violence Against Women Survey, the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey and the Homicide Survey, this Juristat investigates the prevalence, nature and severity of violence that occurs following the breakdown of a marital union.

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20000005748
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Several different analyses have considered the impact of family and demographic change on the economic conditions affecting children (Dooley, 1988, 1991; McQuillan, 1992; Picot and Myles, 1996). The present study updates this reserach to 1997, while shifting the emphasis to families with very young children.

    Release date: 2001-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2000003
    Description:

    In the spring of 1999, the Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division of Statistics Canada (SIEID) decided to review the methods it uses to estimate Higher Education R&D Expenditures (HERD) and Health Gross Expenditures on R&D (Health GERD). The manner in which research is performed and funded in Canadian universities and research hospitals has evolved in recent years, and current methodologies may not take these changes into account. By improving HERD, the health GERD estimates will also benefit. It may be possible to improve them yet again by building upon recent work at Statistics Canada on biotechnology R&D in Canadian Industry.

    In September 1999, an initial study and its recommendations generated a positive reaction from a group of professionals in the university and health research fields. SIEID then created a Working Group and hired a facilitator to examine current estimation methods, to recommend revisions where appropriate, and to produce a framework for an improved program in this area. This document is the final report written by the facilitator, Mireille Brochu.

    Release date: 2001-05-23

  • Articles and reports: 15-204-X19990005493
    Description:

    This chapter looks at how exact productivity estimates are.

    Release date: 2001-02-14

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001158
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Several recent papers have cited non-linearities in the relationship between incomes of parents and their children as evidence of important intergenerational credit constraints. This paper argues that any pattern in the conditional expectation function can be justified by a properly constructed story with credit constraints. This raises questions about the validity of the approach. Quantile regressions provide an alternative test. Using data from Canadian tax files, this paper finds results contrary to the credit constraints hypothesis; the non-linearities in the regression function are driven by the low-ability (unconstrained) sons rather than high-ability (presumably constrained) sons.

    Release date: 2001-01-30

  • Journals and periodicals: 85-551-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report describes some pertinent issues of hate crime: previous findings, international comparisons, recent initiatives, current data sources, and a description of police resources. It also includes findings from the 1999 General Social Survey, which measured self-reported hate crime victimization incidents at the national level.

    Release date: 2001-01-24
Reference (3)

Reference (3) ((3 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2001003
    Description:

    This document provides a detailed description of the methodology of the Survey of Household Spending. Topics covered include: target population; sample design; data collection; data processing; weighting and estimation; estimation of sampling error; and data suppression and confidentiality.

    Release date: 2001-10-15

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0026M2001003
    Description:

    Initial results from the Survey of Financial Security (SFS), which provides information on the net worth of Canadians, were released on March 15 2001, in The daily. The survey collected information on the value of the financial and non-financial assets owned by each family unit and on the amount of their debt.

    Statistics Canada is currently refining this initial estimate of net worth by adding to it an estimate of the value of benefits accrued in employer pension plans. This is an important addition to any asset and debt survey as, for many family units, it is likely to be one of the largest assets. With the aging of the population, information on pension accumulations is greatly needed to better understand the financial situation of those nearing retirement. These updated estimates of the Survey of Financial Security will be released in late fall 2001.

    The process for estimating the value of employer pension plan benefits is a complex one. This document describes the methodology for estimating that value, for the following groups: a) persons who belonged to an RPP at the time of the survey (referred to as current plan members); b) persons who had previously belonged to an RPP and either left the money in the plan or transferred it to a new plan; c) persons who are receiving RPP benefits.

    This methodology was proposed by Hubert Frenken and Michael Cohen. The former has many years of experience with Statistics Canada working with data on employer pension plans; the latter is a principal with the actuarial consulting firm William M. Mercer. Earlier this year, Statistics Canada carried out a public consultation on the proposed methodology. This report includes updates made as a result of feedback received from data users.

    Release date: 2001-09-05

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 15F0077G
    Description:

    This publication provides a description of the data sources and methods used to compile the input-output tables at constant prices. It includes a brief description of the accounting framework, an overview of the methods used for the major components of the tables and an outline of the techniques applied to each group of goods and services. It also distinguishes between the derivation of the gross domestic product by industry for the business sector and that of the non-business sector. Finally, it discusses some of the critical contemporary issues that are being addressed at the time of writing.

    Release date: 2001-02-15
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