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All (10) ((10 results))

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201600714644
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    Children younger than age 18 enumerated in the 2006 Census who lived in Toronto, Montreal or Vancouver were linked to published air pollution exposure land use regression models to assign exposure at the Dissemination Area level. Associations between both socioeconomic and visible minority status and exposure to ambient nitrogen dioxide among children in these three cities were examined in a series of regression models.

    Release date: 2016-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002185
    Geography: Canada, Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This paper examines whether long-run labour market outcomes depend on residential environment among adults who grew up in subsidized housing in Toronto. The housing program in Toronto provides a full spectrum of neighbourhood quality types to measure outcome differences, and offers a real-life example of large scale neighbourhood quality reform. A primary advantage with this approach is that, conditional on participation in public housing, residential choice is substantially limited. Families that applied for public housing could not specify which project they wished to be housed in and were constrained to what was offered based on availability at the time they applied and by family size. Unlike previous housing mobility experiments, the availability of administrative tax records are used to measure both short and long run outcomes. The results indicate almost no difference in educational attainment, adult earnings, income, and social assistance participation between children from different public housing types. Average outcomes, estimated wage distributions, and outcome correlations among unrelated project neighbours show no significant neighbourhood impact. In contrast, family differences seem to matter a great deal.

    Release date: 2002-06-03

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20010026090
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    The number of calls in a telephone survey is used as an indicator of how difficult an intended respondent is to reach. This permits a probabilistic division of the non-respondents into non-susceptibles (those who will always refuse to respond), and the susceptible non-respondents (those who were not available to respond) in a model of the non-response. Further, it permits stochastic estimation of the views of the latter group and an evaluation of whether the non-response is ignorable for inference about the dependent variable. These ideas are implemented on the data from a survey in Metropolitan Toronto of attitudes toward smoking in the workplace. Using a Bayesian model, the posterior distribution of the model parameters is sampled by Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods. The results reveal that the non-response is not ignorable and those who do not respond are twice as likely to favor unrestricted smoking in the workplace as are those who do.

    Release date: 2002-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010098395
    Geography: Province or territory, Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    The 2000 police-reported statistics indicate that the overall crime rate in Canada decreased for the ninth consecutive year and is at its lowest point since 1978. In addition, data from studies such as the 1999 General Social Survey (GSS) suggest that many Canadians perceive crime as having stabilized over the past five years and feel less fearful of being a victim of crime in their neighbourhoods. Despite these positive indicators, the violent crime rate increased by 3% in 2000, the first increase in seven years. This report examines trends and characteristics for the most serious violent crime – homicide.

    Release date: 2001-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20000098382
    Geography: Province or territory, Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    The most recent police-reported statistics indicate that the crime rate in Canada has decreased for the eighth consecutive year and is at its lowest point since 1979. Statistics from the United States and from many other countries show similar trends. However, data from studies such as the 1993 General Social Survey (GSS), the 1996 International Criminal Victimization Survey (ICVS), and national polls suggest that many Canadians perceive crime as increasing and fear being a victim of crime in their neighbourhoods. The most feared crimes are those of a violent nature, especially homicide – the killing of one human being by another – which tends to receive more media attention than any other criminal act. Despite this concern among Canadians about violence, the homicide rate has been declining since the mid-1970s.

    Release date: 2000-10-18

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990118305
    Geography: Province or territory, Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    The Juristat on impaired driving, released every two years, presents data on the declining trend in impaired driving at the national, provincial and census metropolitan area (CMA) levels, as well as the characteristics of persons charged with this offence. The analysis is based on police-reported statistics as well as data from the courts and corrections sectors. Other data sources include data on fatally-injured drivers, on trends in alcohol consumption, as well as information on pro-active police measures such as trends in check-stops and roadside license suspensions.

    Release date: 1999-11-17

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990108304
    Geography: Province or territory, Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    The most recent police-reported statistics indicate that the crime rate in Canada has decreased for the seventh consecutive year and is the lowest since 1979. Statistics from the United States and from many European countries show similar trends. However, data from studies such as the 1993 General Social Survey (GSS), the 1996 International Criminal Victimization Survey (ICVS), and national polls suggest that Canadians perceive crime as increasing and fear being a victim of crime in their neighbourhoods. The most feared crimes are those of a violent nature especially homicide – the killing of one human being by another - which tends to receive more media attention than any other criminal act. Despite this growing concern among Canadians about violence, the homicide rate has gradually been declining since the mid-1970s.

    Release date: 1999-10-07

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19980128231
    Geography: Province or territory, Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    Homicide – the killing of one human being by another - tends to receive more media attention than any other criminal act. Governments, criminal justice agencies and the general public have a vested interest in monitoring the nature and extent of these occurrences. Despite a growing concern among Canadians about violence, the homicide rate has gradually been declining since the mid 1970s.

    Release date: 1998-10-27

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19970098284
    Geography: Province or territory, Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    Homicide tends to receive more media attention and consequently closer public scrutiny than any other criminal act. The act itself, especially if cruel in nature or targeting defenceless members of society, promotes fear in the general public. Despite a growing concern among Canadians about threats of attack or violence, the homicide rate has gradually been declining since the mid 1970s.

    Release date: 1997-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19960118283
    Geography: Province or territory, Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    Police-reported violent crime in Canada increased steadily from the early 1970s through to the early 1990s. Homicides, in particular, tend to be widely covered in the media, especially those of a brutal nature or those targeting the more vulnerable members of society. The 1993 General Social Survey indicated a growing concern among Canadians about threats of attack or violence. Yet the homicide rate has gradually been declining since the mid 1970s.

    Release date: 1996-07-30
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Analysis (10)

Analysis (10) ((10 results))

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201600714644
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    Children younger than age 18 enumerated in the 2006 Census who lived in Toronto, Montreal or Vancouver were linked to published air pollution exposure land use regression models to assign exposure at the Dissemination Area level. Associations between both socioeconomic and visible minority status and exposure to ambient nitrogen dioxide among children in these three cities were examined in a series of regression models.

    Release date: 2016-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002185
    Geography: Canada, Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This paper examines whether long-run labour market outcomes depend on residential environment among adults who grew up in subsidized housing in Toronto. The housing program in Toronto provides a full spectrum of neighbourhood quality types to measure outcome differences, and offers a real-life example of large scale neighbourhood quality reform. A primary advantage with this approach is that, conditional on participation in public housing, residential choice is substantially limited. Families that applied for public housing could not specify which project they wished to be housed in and were constrained to what was offered based on availability at the time they applied and by family size. Unlike previous housing mobility experiments, the availability of administrative tax records are used to measure both short and long run outcomes. The results indicate almost no difference in educational attainment, adult earnings, income, and social assistance participation between children from different public housing types. Average outcomes, estimated wage distributions, and outcome correlations among unrelated project neighbours show no significant neighbourhood impact. In contrast, family differences seem to matter a great deal.

    Release date: 2002-06-03

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20010026090
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    The number of calls in a telephone survey is used as an indicator of how difficult an intended respondent is to reach. This permits a probabilistic division of the non-respondents into non-susceptibles (those who will always refuse to respond), and the susceptible non-respondents (those who were not available to respond) in a model of the non-response. Further, it permits stochastic estimation of the views of the latter group and an evaluation of whether the non-response is ignorable for inference about the dependent variable. These ideas are implemented on the data from a survey in Metropolitan Toronto of attitudes toward smoking in the workplace. Using a Bayesian model, the posterior distribution of the model parameters is sampled by Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods. The results reveal that the non-response is not ignorable and those who do not respond are twice as likely to favor unrestricted smoking in the workplace as are those who do.

    Release date: 2002-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010098395
    Geography: Province or territory, Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    The 2000 police-reported statistics indicate that the overall crime rate in Canada decreased for the ninth consecutive year and is at its lowest point since 1978. In addition, data from studies such as the 1999 General Social Survey (GSS) suggest that many Canadians perceive crime as having stabilized over the past five years and feel less fearful of being a victim of crime in their neighbourhoods. Despite these positive indicators, the violent crime rate increased by 3% in 2000, the first increase in seven years. This report examines trends and characteristics for the most serious violent crime – homicide.

    Release date: 2001-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20000098382
    Geography: Province or territory, Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    The most recent police-reported statistics indicate that the crime rate in Canada has decreased for the eighth consecutive year and is at its lowest point since 1979. Statistics from the United States and from many other countries show similar trends. However, data from studies such as the 1993 General Social Survey (GSS), the 1996 International Criminal Victimization Survey (ICVS), and national polls suggest that many Canadians perceive crime as increasing and fear being a victim of crime in their neighbourhoods. The most feared crimes are those of a violent nature, especially homicide – the killing of one human being by another – which tends to receive more media attention than any other criminal act. Despite this concern among Canadians about violence, the homicide rate has been declining since the mid-1970s.

    Release date: 2000-10-18

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990118305
    Geography: Province or territory, Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    The Juristat on impaired driving, released every two years, presents data on the declining trend in impaired driving at the national, provincial and census metropolitan area (CMA) levels, as well as the characteristics of persons charged with this offence. The analysis is based on police-reported statistics as well as data from the courts and corrections sectors. Other data sources include data on fatally-injured drivers, on trends in alcohol consumption, as well as information on pro-active police measures such as trends in check-stops and roadside license suspensions.

    Release date: 1999-11-17

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990108304
    Geography: Province or territory, Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    The most recent police-reported statistics indicate that the crime rate in Canada has decreased for the seventh consecutive year and is the lowest since 1979. Statistics from the United States and from many European countries show similar trends. However, data from studies such as the 1993 General Social Survey (GSS), the 1996 International Criminal Victimization Survey (ICVS), and national polls suggest that Canadians perceive crime as increasing and fear being a victim of crime in their neighbourhoods. The most feared crimes are those of a violent nature especially homicide – the killing of one human being by another - which tends to receive more media attention than any other criminal act. Despite this growing concern among Canadians about violence, the homicide rate has gradually been declining since the mid-1970s.

    Release date: 1999-10-07

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19980128231
    Geography: Province or territory, Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    Homicide – the killing of one human being by another - tends to receive more media attention than any other criminal act. Governments, criminal justice agencies and the general public have a vested interest in monitoring the nature and extent of these occurrences. Despite a growing concern among Canadians about violence, the homicide rate has gradually been declining since the mid 1970s.

    Release date: 1998-10-27

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19970098284
    Geography: Province or territory, Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    Homicide tends to receive more media attention and consequently closer public scrutiny than any other criminal act. The act itself, especially if cruel in nature or targeting defenceless members of society, promotes fear in the general public. Despite a growing concern among Canadians about threats of attack or violence, the homicide rate has gradually been declining since the mid 1970s.

    Release date: 1997-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19960118283
    Geography: Province or territory, Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    Police-reported violent crime in Canada increased steadily from the early 1970s through to the early 1990s. Homicides, in particular, tend to be widely covered in the media, especially those of a brutal nature or those targeting the more vulnerable members of society. The 1993 General Social Survey indicated a growing concern among Canadians about threats of attack or violence. Yet the homicide rate has gradually been declining since the mid 1970s.

    Release date: 1996-07-30
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