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  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114247
    Description:

    This article examines regional differences in the math and reading skills of immigrant children aged 15 based on data from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). It also examines regional differences in high-school and university completion rates among young immigrants who came to Canada before the age of 15 using National Household Survey (NHS) data. Throughout the article, comparisons are made with the children of the Canadian-born (third- or higher-generation Canadians).

    Release date: 2015-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2004233
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In Canada's federal system for economic (skilled) class immigrant selection, education is treated as if it is homogeneous and only differs in quantity. Some provinces, however, differentiate based on postsecondary field of study. This study explores the economic implications of field of study for each sex, and for two subgroups of immigrants, those educated in Canada and those educated elsewhere .

    Field of study is not observed to explain much of the earnings difference between immigrants and the Canadian born, though it is relatively more important for males than females in doing so. Interestingly, while there are a few exceptions, a general pattern is observed whereby the differences between high- and low-earning fields are not as large for immigrants as for the Canadian born. Similarly, social assistance receipt has smaller variance across fields for immigrants than for the Canadian born. Nevertheless, substantial inter-field differences are observed for each immigrant group.

    Release date: 2004-10-28

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410613121
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the problems new immigrants have when looking for a job in Canada, including non-recognition of their credentials, their education level, and their experience abroad.

    Release date: 2004-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2003196
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper uses the Statistics Canada Survey of Literacy Skills Used in Daily Activities (LSUDA) to investigate minority-white income differences and the role cognitive skills play in those patterns. Some minority groups have substantially lower (tested) levels of literacy and numeracy skills than whites and other more economically successful minorities and, in the case of certain male groups, these differences play a significant role in explaining the observed income patterns. The ethnic-white income gaps are, however, much smaller for women, and the literacy and numeracy variables do not have much of a role to play in explaining those differences. Various policy implications are discussed.

    Release date: 2003-01-24

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001178
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The school performance of the children of immigrants in the Canadian school system is analyzed using data from the first three waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY). School performance is measured in terms of ability at reading, writing, mathematics and overall aptitude. The parents' and teachers' assessments of the children's performances are used, as are the results of formal testing. On average, children of immigrants generally do at least as well as the children of the Canadian-born along each dimension of school performance. The children of immigrant parents whose first language is either English or French have especially high outcomes. The children of other immigrant parents have lower performance in reading, writing and composition but their performance in mathematics is comparable to that of the children of Canadian-born parents. It is also found that with more years in the Canadian education system, the performance of these children in reading, writing and mathematics improves and is equal to or greater than the performance of the children of Canadian-born parents by age thirteen in virtually all areas of performance.

    Release date: 2001-11-14

  • Public use microdata: 89M0018X
    Description:

    This is a CD-ROM product from the Ontario Adult Literacy Survey (OALS), conducted in the spring of 1998 with the goal of providing information on: the ability of Ontario immigrants to use either English or French in their daily activities; and on their self-perceived literacy skills, training needs and barriers to training.

    In order to cover the majority of Ontario immigrants, the Census Metropolitan Areas (CMAs) of Toronto, Hamilton, Ottawa, Kitchener, London and St. Catharines were included in the sample. With these 6 CMAs, about 83% of Ontario immigrants were included in the sample frame. This sample of 7,107 dwellings covered the population of Ontario immigrants in general as well as specifically targetting immigrants with a mother tongue of Italian, Chinese, Portuguese, Polish, and Spanish and immigrants born in the Caribbean Islands with a mother tongue of English.

    Each interview was approximately 1.5 hours in duration and consisted of a half-hour questionnaire, asking demographic and literacy-related questions as well as a one-hour literacy test. This literacy test was derived from that used in the 1994 International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS) and covered the domains of document and quantitative literacy. An overall response rate to the survey of 76% was achieved, resulting in 4,648 respondents.

    Release date: 1999-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19960033174
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Canada has become a world leader in hosting international students. Ranked fifth in the world in 1992, Canada was behind only the United States, France, Germany and the United Kingdom in the number of international postsecondary students hosted. At all levels during the 1993-94 school year, approximately 87,000 international students were studying in Canadian universities, colleges and schools. Although their stay in Canada is usually temporary, international students often bring both cultural and financial benefits. Their presence can enrich Canadian campuses by contributing to a culturally and intellectually diverse learning environment. Also, their enrolment may generate additional revenues for educational institutions at a time when education budgets are under severe pressure. The impact of international students often extends beyond their period of study and their ties with Canada can continue long after they return to their countries.

    Release date: 1996-10-31
Data (2)

Data (2) ((2 results))

Analysis (6)

Analysis (6) ((6 results))

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114247
    Description:

    This article examines regional differences in the math and reading skills of immigrant children aged 15 based on data from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). It also examines regional differences in high-school and university completion rates among young immigrants who came to Canada before the age of 15 using National Household Survey (NHS) data. Throughout the article, comparisons are made with the children of the Canadian-born (third- or higher-generation Canadians).

    Release date: 2015-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2004233
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In Canada's federal system for economic (skilled) class immigrant selection, education is treated as if it is homogeneous and only differs in quantity. Some provinces, however, differentiate based on postsecondary field of study. This study explores the economic implications of field of study for each sex, and for two subgroups of immigrants, those educated in Canada and those educated elsewhere .

    Field of study is not observed to explain much of the earnings difference between immigrants and the Canadian born, though it is relatively more important for males than females in doing so. Interestingly, while there are a few exceptions, a general pattern is observed whereby the differences between high- and low-earning fields are not as large for immigrants as for the Canadian born. Similarly, social assistance receipt has smaller variance across fields for immigrants than for the Canadian born. Nevertheless, substantial inter-field differences are observed for each immigrant group.

    Release date: 2004-10-28

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200410613121
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the problems new immigrants have when looking for a job in Canada, including non-recognition of their credentials, their education level, and their experience abroad.

    Release date: 2004-09-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2003196
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper uses the Statistics Canada Survey of Literacy Skills Used in Daily Activities (LSUDA) to investigate minority-white income differences and the role cognitive skills play in those patterns. Some minority groups have substantially lower (tested) levels of literacy and numeracy skills than whites and other more economically successful minorities and, in the case of certain male groups, these differences play a significant role in explaining the observed income patterns. The ethnic-white income gaps are, however, much smaller for women, and the literacy and numeracy variables do not have much of a role to play in explaining those differences. Various policy implications are discussed.

    Release date: 2003-01-24

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001178
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The school performance of the children of immigrants in the Canadian school system is analyzed using data from the first three waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY). School performance is measured in terms of ability at reading, writing, mathematics and overall aptitude. The parents' and teachers' assessments of the children's performances are used, as are the results of formal testing. On average, children of immigrants generally do at least as well as the children of the Canadian-born along each dimension of school performance. The children of immigrant parents whose first language is either English or French have especially high outcomes. The children of other immigrant parents have lower performance in reading, writing and composition but their performance in mathematics is comparable to that of the children of Canadian-born parents. It is also found that with more years in the Canadian education system, the performance of these children in reading, writing and mathematics improves and is equal to or greater than the performance of the children of Canadian-born parents by age thirteen in virtually all areas of performance.

    Release date: 2001-11-14

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19960033174
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Canada has become a world leader in hosting international students. Ranked fifth in the world in 1992, Canada was behind only the United States, France, Germany and the United Kingdom in the number of international postsecondary students hosted. At all levels during the 1993-94 school year, approximately 87,000 international students were studying in Canadian universities, colleges and schools. Although their stay in Canada is usually temporary, international students often bring both cultural and financial benefits. Their presence can enrich Canadian campuses by contributing to a culturally and intellectually diverse learning environment. Also, their enrolment may generate additional revenues for educational institutions at a time when education budgets are under severe pressure. The impact of international students often extends beyond their period of study and their ties with Canada can continue long after they return to their countries.

    Release date: 1996-10-31
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