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All (5)

All (5) ((5 results))

  • Public use microdata: 81M0011X
    Description:

    This survey was designed to determine such factors as: the extent to which graduates of postsecondary programs had been successful in obtaining employment since graduation; the relationship between the graduates' programs of study and the employment subsequently obtained; the graduates' job and career satisfaction; the rates of under-employment and unemployment; the type of employment obtained related to career expectations and qualification requirements; and the influence of postsecondary education on occupational achievement. The information is directed towards policy makers, researchers, educators, employers and young adults-interested in postsecondary education and the transition from school to work of trade/vocational, college and university graduates.

    Release date: 2020-01-14

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114640
    Description:

    Women have become increasingly well-educated, and today their share in the Canadian labour market is larger than ever. This chapter of Women in Canada examines women’s educational experiences, with a focus on STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics and computer science) education and skills. Topics include a profile of women’s education in Canada, the skills of young girls and women, field-of-study patterns at the postsecondary level, and labour market outcomes, including earnings.

    Release date: 2016-07-06

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2007049
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using current major Statistics Canada data sources related to the education of Canadians, this publication presents some of what we currently know on educating health workers to begin to address some critical questions facing Canadians today: Does Canada have enough interested individuals with the right skills who want to work in health? Does it have the infrastructure, capacity, and effective education system to ensure an adequate supply of health workers to meet future health care demands? As such, the report is primarily comprised of information tables accompanied by some brief analysis intended to highlight broad findings that may guide the reader in interpreting the tables.

    Release date: 2007-08-13

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2003003
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report provides a description of the labour-market outcomes experienced by 1995 postsecondary graduates, by gender and by field of specialization.

    Release date: 2003-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20000025126
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    To understand the relationship between S&T skills and the labour market Statistics Canada has produced a study that provides insight into where S&T skills are deployed. As a group, the number of persons with S&T degrees, pegged at 5 million in 1996, has been growing five times faster than the number of non S&T degree holders. The highest concentrations of S&T graduates are in health (52.0% have S&T degrees), business services (38.1%), and construction (34.3%).

    Release date: 2000-06-01
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Public use microdata: 81M0011X
    Description:

    This survey was designed to determine such factors as: the extent to which graduates of postsecondary programs had been successful in obtaining employment since graduation; the relationship between the graduates' programs of study and the employment subsequently obtained; the graduates' job and career satisfaction; the rates of under-employment and unemployment; the type of employment obtained related to career expectations and qualification requirements; and the influence of postsecondary education on occupational achievement. The information is directed towards policy makers, researchers, educators, employers and young adults-interested in postsecondary education and the transition from school to work of trade/vocational, college and university graduates.

    Release date: 2020-01-14
Analysis (4)

Analysis (4) ((4 results))

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114640
    Description:

    Women have become increasingly well-educated, and today their share in the Canadian labour market is larger than ever. This chapter of Women in Canada examines women’s educational experiences, with a focus on STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics and computer science) education and skills. Topics include a profile of women’s education in Canada, the skills of young girls and women, field-of-study patterns at the postsecondary level, and labour market outcomes, including earnings.

    Release date: 2016-07-06

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2007049
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using current major Statistics Canada data sources related to the education of Canadians, this publication presents some of what we currently know on educating health workers to begin to address some critical questions facing Canadians today: Does Canada have enough interested individuals with the right skills who want to work in health? Does it have the infrastructure, capacity, and effective education system to ensure an adequate supply of health workers to meet future health care demands? As such, the report is primarily comprised of information tables accompanied by some brief analysis intended to highlight broad findings that may guide the reader in interpreting the tables.

    Release date: 2007-08-13

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2003003
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report provides a description of the labour-market outcomes experienced by 1995 postsecondary graduates, by gender and by field of specialization.

    Release date: 2003-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20000025126
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    To understand the relationship between S&T skills and the labour market Statistics Canada has produced a study that provides insight into where S&T skills are deployed. As a group, the number of persons with S&T degrees, pegged at 5 million in 1996, has been growing five times faster than the number of non S&T degree holders. The highest concentrations of S&T graduates are in health (52.0% have S&T degrees), business services (38.1%), and construction (34.3%).

    Release date: 2000-06-01
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