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All (13) (0 to 10 of 13 results)

  • Stats in brief: 89-20-00022018001
    Description:

    This article presents the history of statistical law in Canada.

    Release date: 2018-12-21

  • Public use microdata: 81M0011X
    Description:

    This survey was designed to determine such factors as: the extent to which graduates of postsecondary programs had been successful in obtaining employment since graduation; the relationship between the graduates' programs of study and the employment subsequently obtained; the graduates' job and career satisfaction; the rates of under-employment and unemployment; the type of employment obtained related to career expectations and qualification requirements; and the influence of postsecondary education on occupational achievement. The information is directed towards policy makers, researchers, educators, employers and young adults-interested in postsecondary education and the transition from school to work of trade/vocational, college and university graduates.

    Release date: 2015-01-12

  • Table: 85F0015X
    Description:

    The Legal Aid Survey provides information on revenues, expenditures, personnel, and caseload (e.g., applications for legal aid services) associated with the delivery of legal aid in the 13 provinces and territories in Canada in 2011/2012. Data were collected through a survey questionnaire sent to the 13 legal aid plans in Canada, from provincial and territorial departments responsible for justice matters, and from Justice Canada.

    Release date: 2013-03-07

  • Public use microdata: 89M0017X
    Description:

    The public use microdata file from the 2010 Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating is now available. This file contains information collected from nearly 15,000 respondents aged 15 and over residing in private households in the provinces.The public use microdata file provides provincial-level information about the ways in which Canadians donate money and in-kind gifts to charitable and nonprofit organizations; volunteer their time to these organizations; provide help directly to others. Socio-demographic, income and labour force data are also included on the file.

    Release date: 2012-05-04

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008069
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    "Doctorate Education in Canada: Findings from the Survey of Earned Doctorates, 2005/2006" is the third paper in a series of reports written by the Learning Policy Directorate of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC) and the Centre for Education Statistics of Statistics Canada. Each report presents an overview of doctoral education covering annual data from the Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED) from each of the three years of the survey's existence (2003/2004, 2004/2005 and 2005/2006).

    The Survey of Earned Doctorates is a key source of information regarding the training of doctoral graduates in Canada. It provides information on the pathways of these highly qualified graduates through the education system and sheds light into the expectations of graduates as they transition into employment and postdoctoral education.

    In this 2005/2006 report, special attention has been given to the foreign born among the doctoral graduates. Foreign-born graduates represent more than one in every five graduates in the 2005/2006 academic year, and over half of all doctoral graduates living in Canada in 2006. Canada's immigration policy, with its emphasis on educational attainment, ensures that the foreign born will continue to account for a large proportion of Canada's doctorate degree holders. Furthermore, attracting foreign-born talent to Canada will be important if Canada is to increase the number of doctoral degree holders, since growth in the graduates from Canadian institutions has been minimal. One of the key challenges will be to retain graduates, both foreign-born and Canadian-born, in Canada upon the completion of their degree.

    Also unique to this third report, is the ability to discuss trends over the three years of survey data.

    Release date: 2008-10-17

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20060019183
    Description:

    This article reports on a recent study that draws on data from the 1995 and 2000 classes of the National Graduates Survey (NGS) to examine the impact of recent sharp increases in university tuition fees for professional programs on the participation in those programs of students from different socioeconomic backgrounds. Family socioeconomic background is measured by information on parental education, which is highly correlated with family income, and is thus indicative of ability to pay for their children's postsecondary education.

    Release date: 2006-04-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2004233
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In Canada's federal system for economic (skilled) class immigrant selection, education is treated as if it is homogeneous and only differs in quantity. Some provinces, however, differentiate based on postsecondary field of study. This study explores the economic implications of field of study for each sex, and for two subgroups of immigrants, those educated in Canada and those educated elsewhere .

    Field of study is not observed to explain much of the earnings difference between immigrants and the Canadian born, though it is relatively more important for males than females in doing so. Interestingly, while there are a few exceptions, a general pattern is observed whereby the differences between high- and low-earning fields are not as large for immigrants as for the Canadian born. Similarly, social assistance receipt has smaller variance across fields for immigrants than for the Canadian born. Nevertheless, substantial inter-field differences are observed for each immigrant group.

    Release date: 2004-10-28

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20040037018
    Description:

    The past decade has seen rising costs associated with postsecondary education. Drawing on data from the Postsecondary Education Participation Survey, conducted in February and March 2002, this article examines: trends in tuition fees; annual expenditures of students in college or university for tuition, living costs and other expenses; and sources of financing relied on by students to cover costs for the 2001-2002 academic year.

    Release date: 2004-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002164
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper reports the results of an empirical analysis of the early career outcomes of recent Canadian Bachelor's level graduates by discipline based on three waves of the National Graduates Surveys, which comprise large, representative databases of individuals who successfully completed their programmes at Canadian universities in 1982, 1986, and 1990, with information gathered during interviews conducted two and five years after graduation for each group of graduates (1984/87, 1988/92, 1990/95).

    The outcomes analysed, all broken down by sex and discipline, include: the distribution of graduates by field and the percentage of female graduates; the percentage of graduates who subsequently completed another educational programme; the overall evaluation of the choice of major (would they choose it again?); unemployment rates, the percentage of workers in part-time jobs, in temporary jobs, self-employed; the job-education skill and credentials matches; earnings levels and rates of growth; and job satisfaction (earnings, overall).

    Many of the outcomes conform to expectations, typically reflecting the different orientations of the various disciplines with respect to direct career preparedness, with the professions and other applied disciplines generally characterised by lower unemployment rates, closer skill and qualification matches, higher earnings, and so on. On the other hand, while the "applied" fields also tend to perform well in terms of the "softer", more subjective measures regarding job satisfaction and the overall evaluation of the chosen programme (would the graduate choose the same major again?), the findings also indicate that graduates' assessments of their post-graduation experiences and overall evaluations of the programmes from which they graduated are based on more than simply adding up standard measures of labour market "success", with the job satisfaction scores and - perhaps most interestingly - the overall programme evaluations often departing from what the objective measures (unemployment rates, earnings levels, etc.) might have predicted. Some implications of the findings are discussed and avenues for future research are suggested.

    Release date: 2002-03-21

  • 10. Time to skillArchived
    Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020016150
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Given that science and technology skills are a high priority for maintaining Canada's competitive advantage in the new economy, the obvious question is: Where do S&T skills come from and how does Canada compare with other countries? Read the findings from a recent Statistics Canada study that examines the ins and outs of the science stream, starting in Grade 4 through to the workforce.

    Release date: 2002-02-15
Data (3)

Data (3) ((3 results))

  • Public use microdata: 81M0011X
    Description:

    This survey was designed to determine such factors as: the extent to which graduates of postsecondary programs had been successful in obtaining employment since graduation; the relationship between the graduates' programs of study and the employment subsequently obtained; the graduates' job and career satisfaction; the rates of under-employment and unemployment; the type of employment obtained related to career expectations and qualification requirements; and the influence of postsecondary education on occupational achievement. The information is directed towards policy makers, researchers, educators, employers and young adults-interested in postsecondary education and the transition from school to work of trade/vocational, college and university graduates.

    Release date: 2015-01-12

  • Table: 85F0015X
    Description:

    The Legal Aid Survey provides information on revenues, expenditures, personnel, and caseload (e.g., applications for legal aid services) associated with the delivery of legal aid in the 13 provinces and territories in Canada in 2011/2012. Data were collected through a survey questionnaire sent to the 13 legal aid plans in Canada, from provincial and territorial departments responsible for justice matters, and from Justice Canada.

    Release date: 2013-03-07

  • Public use microdata: 89M0017X
    Description:

    The public use microdata file from the 2010 Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating is now available. This file contains information collected from nearly 15,000 respondents aged 15 and over residing in private households in the provinces.The public use microdata file provides provincial-level information about the ways in which Canadians donate money and in-kind gifts to charitable and nonprofit organizations; volunteer their time to these organizations; provide help directly to others. Socio-demographic, income and labour force data are also included on the file.

    Release date: 2012-05-04
Analysis (10)

Analysis (10) ((10 results))

  • Stats in brief: 89-20-00022018001
    Description:

    This article presents the history of statistical law in Canada.

    Release date: 2018-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008069
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    "Doctorate Education in Canada: Findings from the Survey of Earned Doctorates, 2005/2006" is the third paper in a series of reports written by the Learning Policy Directorate of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC) and the Centre for Education Statistics of Statistics Canada. Each report presents an overview of doctoral education covering annual data from the Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED) from each of the three years of the survey's existence (2003/2004, 2004/2005 and 2005/2006).

    The Survey of Earned Doctorates is a key source of information regarding the training of doctoral graduates in Canada. It provides information on the pathways of these highly qualified graduates through the education system and sheds light into the expectations of graduates as they transition into employment and postdoctoral education.

    In this 2005/2006 report, special attention has been given to the foreign born among the doctoral graduates. Foreign-born graduates represent more than one in every five graduates in the 2005/2006 academic year, and over half of all doctoral graduates living in Canada in 2006. Canada's immigration policy, with its emphasis on educational attainment, ensures that the foreign born will continue to account for a large proportion of Canada's doctorate degree holders. Furthermore, attracting foreign-born talent to Canada will be important if Canada is to increase the number of doctoral degree holders, since growth in the graduates from Canadian institutions has been minimal. One of the key challenges will be to retain graduates, both foreign-born and Canadian-born, in Canada upon the completion of their degree.

    Also unique to this third report, is the ability to discuss trends over the three years of survey data.

    Release date: 2008-10-17

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20060019183
    Description:

    This article reports on a recent study that draws on data from the 1995 and 2000 classes of the National Graduates Survey (NGS) to examine the impact of recent sharp increases in university tuition fees for professional programs on the participation in those programs of students from different socioeconomic backgrounds. Family socioeconomic background is measured by information on parental education, which is highly correlated with family income, and is thus indicative of ability to pay for their children's postsecondary education.

    Release date: 2006-04-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2004233
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In Canada's federal system for economic (skilled) class immigrant selection, education is treated as if it is homogeneous and only differs in quantity. Some provinces, however, differentiate based on postsecondary field of study. This study explores the economic implications of field of study for each sex, and for two subgroups of immigrants, those educated in Canada and those educated elsewhere .

    Field of study is not observed to explain much of the earnings difference between immigrants and the Canadian born, though it is relatively more important for males than females in doing so. Interestingly, while there are a few exceptions, a general pattern is observed whereby the differences between high- and low-earning fields are not as large for immigrants as for the Canadian born. Similarly, social assistance receipt has smaller variance across fields for immigrants than for the Canadian born. Nevertheless, substantial inter-field differences are observed for each immigrant group.

    Release date: 2004-10-28

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20040037018
    Description:

    The past decade has seen rising costs associated with postsecondary education. Drawing on data from the Postsecondary Education Participation Survey, conducted in February and March 2002, this article examines: trends in tuition fees; annual expenditures of students in college or university for tuition, living costs and other expenses; and sources of financing relied on by students to cover costs for the 2001-2002 academic year.

    Release date: 2004-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002164
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper reports the results of an empirical analysis of the early career outcomes of recent Canadian Bachelor's level graduates by discipline based on three waves of the National Graduates Surveys, which comprise large, representative databases of individuals who successfully completed their programmes at Canadian universities in 1982, 1986, and 1990, with information gathered during interviews conducted two and five years after graduation for each group of graduates (1984/87, 1988/92, 1990/95).

    The outcomes analysed, all broken down by sex and discipline, include: the distribution of graduates by field and the percentage of female graduates; the percentage of graduates who subsequently completed another educational programme; the overall evaluation of the choice of major (would they choose it again?); unemployment rates, the percentage of workers in part-time jobs, in temporary jobs, self-employed; the job-education skill and credentials matches; earnings levels and rates of growth; and job satisfaction (earnings, overall).

    Many of the outcomes conform to expectations, typically reflecting the different orientations of the various disciplines with respect to direct career preparedness, with the professions and other applied disciplines generally characterised by lower unemployment rates, closer skill and qualification matches, higher earnings, and so on. On the other hand, while the "applied" fields also tend to perform well in terms of the "softer", more subjective measures regarding job satisfaction and the overall evaluation of the chosen programme (would the graduate choose the same major again?), the findings also indicate that graduates' assessments of their post-graduation experiences and overall evaluations of the programmes from which they graduated are based on more than simply adding up standard measures of labour market "success", with the job satisfaction scores and - perhaps most interestingly - the overall programme evaluations often departing from what the objective measures (unemployment rates, earnings levels, etc.) might have predicted. Some implications of the findings are discussed and avenues for future research are suggested.

    Release date: 2002-03-21

  • 7. Time to skillArchived
    Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020016150
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Given that science and technology skills are a high priority for maintaining Canada's competitive advantage in the new economy, the obvious question is: Where do S&T skills come from and how does Canada compare with other countries? Read the findings from a recent Statistics Canada study that examines the ins and outs of the science stream, starting in Grade 4 through to the workforce.

    Release date: 2002-02-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19990034681
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    As governments have cut back on social and other services, an aging population's need for a strong support structure has grown. Seniors, in fact, have created both a growing market for such services and a potential source of volunteer labour to meet these needs; How involved are seniors in volunteering? What services are they providing? This study examines the volunteer activity of seniors aged 55 and over in 1997.

    Release date: 1999-09-01

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19970033623
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This paper, which examines, pathways pursued by undergraduate degree students in Ontario, is the first of a series of articles that will be developed as a result of this research. Students who entered undergraduate programs, either bachelor's or first professional programs, in Ontario from 1980 to 1984 (entry cohort) were traced from entry until the 1992-93 academic year. As a result, students had eight or more years during which they might have completed the requirements of their programs, at either the university in which they first enrolled or another Ontario university. In particular, the age of entry, program choices, completion rate and duration of study for the entry cohort are examined in this paper. As this first paper is limited to one province, some students who did not graduate may have completed their program requirements elsewhere. Nonetheless, results presented provide useful information on students's study patterns that was previously unavailable.

    Release date: 1998-03-04

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1994069
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Employment equity legislation is becoming more prevalent in Canadian labour markets, yet -- other than broad availability numbers -- the labour market experiencesof designated groups have not been well documented. Using the National Graduates Survey of 1992, this report profiles the early labour market experiences ofvisible minorities, Aboriginal peoples and persons with disabilities who graduated from Canadian universities and community colleges in 1990. In general, we find thatthe earnings of designated group members are very similar to the earnings of their classmates. However, we also find that members of these groups are more likely tobe unemployed and are less likely to participate in the labour force than others in their class.

    Release date: 1994-11-16
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