Keyword search

Filter results by

Search Help
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Type

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Year of publication

6 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Geography

2 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.
Sort Help
entries

Results

All (10)

All (10) ((10 results))

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201501014228
    Description:

    This study presents the results of a hierarchical exact matching approach to link the 2006 Census of Population with hospital data for all provinces and territories (excluding Quebec) to the 2006/2007-to-2008/2009 Discharge Abstract Database. The purpose is to determine if the Census–DAD linkage performed similarly in different jurisdictions, and if linkage and coverage rates declined as time passed since the census.

    Release date: 2015-10-21

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201401014098
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This study compares registry and non-registry approaches to linking 2006 Census of Population data for Manitoba and Ontario to Hospital data from the Discharge Abstract Database.

    Release date: 2014-10-15

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201000211235
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study investigates health outcomes of patients who underwent hip or knee replacement surgery.

    Release date: 2010-06-16

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010972
    Description:

    Background: Evaluation of the coverage that results from linking routinely collected administrative hospital data with survey data is an important preliminary step to undertaking analyses based on the linked file. Data and methods: To evaluate the coverage of the linkage between data from cycle 1.1 of the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) and in-patient hospital data (Health Person-Oriented Information or HPOI), the number of people admitted to hospital according to HPOI was compared with the weighted estimate for CCHS respondents who were successfully linked to HPOI. Differences between HPOI and the linked and weighted CCHS estimate indicated linkage failure and/or undercoverage. Results: According to HPOI, from September 2000 through November 2001, 1,572,343 people (outside Quebec) aged 12 or older were hospitalized. Weighted estimates from the linked CCHS, adjusted for agreement to link and plausible health number, were 7.7% lower. Coverage rates were similar for males and females. Provincial rates did not differ from those for the rest of Canada, although differences were apparent for the territories. Coverage rates were significantly lower among people aged 75 or older than among those aged 12 to 74.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X200900110773
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article assesses the coverage of the linkage between data from cycle 1.1 of the Canadian Community Health Survey and inpatient hospital data.

    Release date: 2009-01-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200600110431
    Description:

    We describe statistical disclosure control methods (SDC) developed for a public release Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program (CHIRPP) micro-data file. CHIRPP is a national injury surveillance database managed by the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC). After describing CHIRPP, the paper includes a brief overview of basic SDC concepts, as an introduction to the process for selecting and developing the appropriate SDC methods for CHIRPP given its specific challenges and requirements. We then summarize some key results. The paper concludes with a discussion of the implication of this work for the health information field and closing remarks with respect to the some methodological issues for consideration.

    Release date: 2008-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200600110448
    Description:

    Approaches used to select records for tabulation of national injury hospitalization data were identified. Three of the approaches were based on the principal diagnosis in the hospital separation record; the other three required that the record contain a code for an external cause of injury. Differences within these two main groups resulted in identification of six distinct approaches. Each approach was applied to the same set of hospital separation data. The numbers and types of injury records retrieved with the six approaches are compared and implications of the findings for injury surveillance are discussed.

    Release date: 2008-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200600110449
    Description:

    Traditionally administrative hospital discharge databases have been mainly used for administrative purposes. Recently, health services researchers and population health researchers have been using the databases for a wide variety of studies; in particular health care outcomes. Tools, such as comorbidity indexes, have been developed to facilitate this analysis. Every time the coding system for diagnoses and procedures is revised or a new one is developed, these comorbidity indexes need to be updated. These updates are important in maintaining consistency when trends are examined over time.

    Release date: 2008-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-005-X20020016479
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Population Health Model (POHEM) is a policy analysis tool that helps answer "what-if" questions about the health and economic burden of specific diseases and the cost-effectiveness of administering new diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. This simulation model is particularly pertinent in an era of fiscal restraint, when new therapies are generally expensive and difficult policy decisions are being made. More important, it provides a base for a broader framework to inform policy decisions using comprehensive disease data and risk factors. Our "base case" models comprehensively estimate the lifetime costs of treating breast, lung and colorectal cancer in Canada. Our cancer models have shown the large financial burden of diagnostic work-up and initial therapy, as well as the high costs of hospitalizing those dying of cancer. Our core cancer models (lung, breast and colorectal cancer) have been used to evaluate the impact of new practice patterns. We have used these models to evaluate new chemotherapy regimens as therapeutic options for advanced lung cancer; the health and financial impact of reducing the hospital length of stay for initial breast cancer surgery; and the potential impact of population-based screening for colorectal cancer. To date, the most interesting intervention we have studied has been the use of tamoxifen to prevent breast cancer among high risk women.

    Release date: 2002-10-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20010016238
    Description:

    This paper discusses in detail issues dealing with the technical aspects of designing and conducting surveys. It is intended for an audience of survey methodologists.

    Research programs building on population-based, longitudinal administrative data and record-linkage techniques are found in England, Scotland, the United States (the Mayo Clinic), Western Australia and Canada. These systems can markedly expand both the methodological and the substantive research in health and health care.

    This paper summarizes published, Canadian data quality studies regarding registries, hospital discharges, prescription drugs, and physician claims. It makes suggestions for improving registries, facilitating record linkage and expanding research into social epidemiology. New trends in case identification and health status measurement using administrative data have also been noted. And the differing needs for data quality research in each province have been highlighted.

    Release date: 2002-09-12
Data (0)

Data (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Analysis (10)

Analysis (10) ((10 results))

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201501014228
    Description:

    This study presents the results of a hierarchical exact matching approach to link the 2006 Census of Population with hospital data for all provinces and territories (excluding Quebec) to the 2006/2007-to-2008/2009 Discharge Abstract Database. The purpose is to determine if the Census–DAD linkage performed similarly in different jurisdictions, and if linkage and coverage rates declined as time passed since the census.

    Release date: 2015-10-21

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201401014098
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This study compares registry and non-registry approaches to linking 2006 Census of Population data for Manitoba and Ontario to Hospital data from the Discharge Abstract Database.

    Release date: 2014-10-15

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201000211235
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study investigates health outcomes of patients who underwent hip or knee replacement surgery.

    Release date: 2010-06-16

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010972
    Description:

    Background: Evaluation of the coverage that results from linking routinely collected administrative hospital data with survey data is an important preliminary step to undertaking analyses based on the linked file. Data and methods: To evaluate the coverage of the linkage between data from cycle 1.1 of the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) and in-patient hospital data (Health Person-Oriented Information or HPOI), the number of people admitted to hospital according to HPOI was compared with the weighted estimate for CCHS respondents who were successfully linked to HPOI. Differences between HPOI and the linked and weighted CCHS estimate indicated linkage failure and/or undercoverage. Results: According to HPOI, from September 2000 through November 2001, 1,572,343 people (outside Quebec) aged 12 or older were hospitalized. Weighted estimates from the linked CCHS, adjusted for agreement to link and plausible health number, were 7.7% lower. Coverage rates were similar for males and females. Provincial rates did not differ from those for the rest of Canada, although differences were apparent for the territories. Coverage rates were significantly lower among people aged 75 or older than among those aged 12 to 74.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X200900110773
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article assesses the coverage of the linkage between data from cycle 1.1 of the Canadian Community Health Survey and inpatient hospital data.

    Release date: 2009-01-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200600110431
    Description:

    We describe statistical disclosure control methods (SDC) developed for a public release Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program (CHIRPP) micro-data file. CHIRPP is a national injury surveillance database managed by the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC). After describing CHIRPP, the paper includes a brief overview of basic SDC concepts, as an introduction to the process for selecting and developing the appropriate SDC methods for CHIRPP given its specific challenges and requirements. We then summarize some key results. The paper concludes with a discussion of the implication of this work for the health information field and closing remarks with respect to the some methodological issues for consideration.

    Release date: 2008-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200600110448
    Description:

    Approaches used to select records for tabulation of national injury hospitalization data were identified. Three of the approaches were based on the principal diagnosis in the hospital separation record; the other three required that the record contain a code for an external cause of injury. Differences within these two main groups resulted in identification of six distinct approaches. Each approach was applied to the same set of hospital separation data. The numbers and types of injury records retrieved with the six approaches are compared and implications of the findings for injury surveillance are discussed.

    Release date: 2008-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200600110449
    Description:

    Traditionally administrative hospital discharge databases have been mainly used for administrative purposes. Recently, health services researchers and population health researchers have been using the databases for a wide variety of studies; in particular health care outcomes. Tools, such as comorbidity indexes, have been developed to facilitate this analysis. Every time the coding system for diagnoses and procedures is revised or a new one is developed, these comorbidity indexes need to be updated. These updates are important in maintaining consistency when trends are examined over time.

    Release date: 2008-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-005-X20020016479
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Population Health Model (POHEM) is a policy analysis tool that helps answer "what-if" questions about the health and economic burden of specific diseases and the cost-effectiveness of administering new diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. This simulation model is particularly pertinent in an era of fiscal restraint, when new therapies are generally expensive and difficult policy decisions are being made. More important, it provides a base for a broader framework to inform policy decisions using comprehensive disease data and risk factors. Our "base case" models comprehensively estimate the lifetime costs of treating breast, lung and colorectal cancer in Canada. Our cancer models have shown the large financial burden of diagnostic work-up and initial therapy, as well as the high costs of hospitalizing those dying of cancer. Our core cancer models (lung, breast and colorectal cancer) have been used to evaluate the impact of new practice patterns. We have used these models to evaluate new chemotherapy regimens as therapeutic options for advanced lung cancer; the health and financial impact of reducing the hospital length of stay for initial breast cancer surgery; and the potential impact of population-based screening for colorectal cancer. To date, the most interesting intervention we have studied has been the use of tamoxifen to prevent breast cancer among high risk women.

    Release date: 2002-10-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20010016238
    Description:

    This paper discusses in detail issues dealing with the technical aspects of designing and conducting surveys. It is intended for an audience of survey methodologists.

    Research programs building on population-based, longitudinal administrative data and record-linkage techniques are found in England, Scotland, the United States (the Mayo Clinic), Western Australia and Canada. These systems can markedly expand both the methodological and the substantive research in health and health care.

    This paper summarizes published, Canadian data quality studies regarding registries, hospital discharges, prescription drugs, and physician claims. It makes suggestions for improving registries, facilitating record linkage and expanding research into social epidemiology. New trends in case identification and health status measurement using administrative data have also been noted. And the differing needs for data quality research in each province have been highlighted.

    Release date: 2002-09-12
Reference (0)

Reference (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Date modified: