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All (31) (0 to 10 of 31 results)

  • Stats in brief: 89-652-X2016004
    Description:

    This fact sheet looks at participation in volunteer activities when employees receive various forms of support for volunteering from their employer. It also provides an overview of the distribution of the types of employer support for volunteering by various job-market-related characteristics and for certain sociodemographic characteristics recognized as being determinants of volunteering.

    Release date: 2016-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016378
    Description:

    In spite of the role that employers may play in the selection of economic immigrants, little is known about whether and how firm-level characteristics are associated with immigrants’ labour market outcomes over the longer term. As a first step towards providing relevant evidence, this study asks whether there are large gaps between the initial earnings of immigrants starting with low- or high-paying firms, and whether the initial earnings gaps narrow with increasing length of residence in Canada. It further examines whether earnings returns to human capital among immigrants are larger if they start working in high-paying firms than in low-paying firms. This paper uses data from the Canadian Employer-Employee Dynamics Database (CEEDD) developed by Statistics Canada.

    Release date: 2016-06-01

  • Public use microdata: 75M0010X
    Description:

    The cross-sectional public-use microdata file for the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) is a collection of income, labour and family variables on persons in Canada and their families. This file includes many safeguards to prevent the identification of any one person.

    Although often referred to as a single file, the SLID public-use microdata file is actually four separate files: key, person, economic family and census family.

    The person file contains identifier data, which allows a researcher to group persons into households, economic families and census families, as well as link each of these files together.

    Release date: 2014-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201200111670
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines employer support of volunteering in Canada. It focuses on volunteers who are employed, examining the different types of employer support they receive. It also looks at the number of hours volunteered by supported employees, as well as the type of activities they engage in and work-related skills they acquire through volunteering. Possible effects of employer support are explored, including how it relates to employees' perceptions that volunteering increases their chances of job success.

    Release date: 2012-05-17

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201100211493
    Description:

    According to the 2008 Access and Support to Education and Training Survey (ASETS), nearly 8 million adults between the ages of 25 and 64 took part in formal training activities or education between July 2007 and June 2008, and most of them did so for career- or job-related reasons. This article examines the participation of adult workers in formal, job-related training activities or education. The participation rates of adult workers are analyzed in relation to their demographic characteristics, occupation, employer characteristics, training objectives and learning obstacles.

    Release date: 2011-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 13F0026M2010001
    Description:

    Amidst the financial crisis and changes in the labour market, retirement savings plans are subject to greater scrutiny. The retirement income system in Canada stands on both public and private retirement savings plans. This article describes the coverage of Canadian workers by private retirement savings plans. Using cross-sectional tax data from the T1 Family File, we describe the coverage of Canadian employed tax filers aged 15 or more by employer-sponsored pension plans (EPPs) and whether or not they contributed to Registered Retirement Savings Plans (RRSPs) in 1997, 2000, 2003, 2006 and 2008. The share of employed tax filers participating in either type of plan declined from 54% in 1997 to 50% in 2008 and this is mainly driven by a decreasing share of employed tax filers contributing to a RRSP. The share of employed tax filers participating in an EPP remained fairly stable over the period.

    Release date: 2010-03-26

  • 7. Employer top-ups Archived
    Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010213243
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    To compensate for earnings lost by employees on leave, some employers provide parents with a Supplemental Unemployment Benefit (SUB), also known as a top-up. The SUB is a government initiative that employers use as a means of reducing the net earnings loss of their employees on leave. This article examines who is likely to receive a top-up and whether the benefit influences mother's return-to-work behaviour.

    Release date: 2010-03-23

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 71-221-X
    Description:

    This electronic product provides information on all Workplace and Employee Survey (WES) variables, descriptions and response categories, as well as range of values. Starting with content themes, information is accessible through a hierarchical fashion, quickly guiding data users to variables of interest.

    Release date: 2007-05-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20061129544
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Discussions related to work hours are typically driven by cross-sectional studies. Much less is known about the longitudinal perspective and the persistence of long hours or periods of underemployment. The annual hours of employees are examined over a five-year period to determine what proportion experience variable work years and how their well-being is affected.

    Release date: 2007-03-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060079272
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Despite continuing concerns that rising levels of foreign investment might lead to the hollowing-out of corporate Canada, there is little evidence that this was occurring. The number of head offices in Canada and their employment continued to rise, led by foreign-controlled firms.

    Release date: 2006-07-13
Data (2)

Data (2) ((2 results))

  • Public use microdata: 75M0010X
    Description:

    The cross-sectional public-use microdata file for the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) is a collection of income, labour and family variables on persons in Canada and their families. This file includes many safeguards to prevent the identification of any one person.

    Although often referred to as a single file, the SLID public-use microdata file is actually four separate files: key, person, economic family and census family.

    The person file contains identifier data, which allows a researcher to group persons into households, economic families and census families, as well as link each of these files together.

    Release date: 2014-07-30

  • Table: 12F0080X
    Description:

    This publication presents a series of tabulations produced from the General Social Survey on time use of Canadians. It includes information on average amounts of time spent on various activities by sex, by age, by selected role groups.

    Release date: 2006-07-12
Analysis (26)

Analysis (26) (0 to 10 of 26 results)

  • Stats in brief: 89-652-X2016004
    Description:

    This fact sheet looks at participation in volunteer activities when employees receive various forms of support for volunteering from their employer. It also provides an overview of the distribution of the types of employer support for volunteering by various job-market-related characteristics and for certain sociodemographic characteristics recognized as being determinants of volunteering.

    Release date: 2016-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016378
    Description:

    In spite of the role that employers may play in the selection of economic immigrants, little is known about whether and how firm-level characteristics are associated with immigrants’ labour market outcomes over the longer term. As a first step towards providing relevant evidence, this study asks whether there are large gaps between the initial earnings of immigrants starting with low- or high-paying firms, and whether the initial earnings gaps narrow with increasing length of residence in Canada. It further examines whether earnings returns to human capital among immigrants are larger if they start working in high-paying firms than in low-paying firms. This paper uses data from the Canadian Employer-Employee Dynamics Database (CEEDD) developed by Statistics Canada.

    Release date: 2016-06-01

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201200111670
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines employer support of volunteering in Canada. It focuses on volunteers who are employed, examining the different types of employer support they receive. It also looks at the number of hours volunteered by supported employees, as well as the type of activities they engage in and work-related skills they acquire through volunteering. Possible effects of employer support are explored, including how it relates to employees' perceptions that volunteering increases their chances of job success.

    Release date: 2012-05-17

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201100211493
    Description:

    According to the 2008 Access and Support to Education and Training Survey (ASETS), nearly 8 million adults between the ages of 25 and 64 took part in formal training activities or education between July 2007 and June 2008, and most of them did so for career- or job-related reasons. This article examines the participation of adult workers in formal, job-related training activities or education. The participation rates of adult workers are analyzed in relation to their demographic characteristics, occupation, employer characteristics, training objectives and learning obstacles.

    Release date: 2011-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 13F0026M2010001
    Description:

    Amidst the financial crisis and changes in the labour market, retirement savings plans are subject to greater scrutiny. The retirement income system in Canada stands on both public and private retirement savings plans. This article describes the coverage of Canadian workers by private retirement savings plans. Using cross-sectional tax data from the T1 Family File, we describe the coverage of Canadian employed tax filers aged 15 or more by employer-sponsored pension plans (EPPs) and whether or not they contributed to Registered Retirement Savings Plans (RRSPs) in 1997, 2000, 2003, 2006 and 2008. The share of employed tax filers participating in either type of plan declined from 54% in 1997 to 50% in 2008 and this is mainly driven by a decreasing share of employed tax filers contributing to a RRSP. The share of employed tax filers participating in an EPP remained fairly stable over the period.

    Release date: 2010-03-26

  • 6. Employer top-ups Archived
    Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010213243
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    To compensate for earnings lost by employees on leave, some employers provide parents with a Supplemental Unemployment Benefit (SUB), also known as a top-up. The SUB is a government initiative that employers use as a means of reducing the net earnings loss of their employees on leave. This article examines who is likely to receive a top-up and whether the benefit influences mother's return-to-work behaviour.

    Release date: 2010-03-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20061129544
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Discussions related to work hours are typically driven by cross-sectional studies. Much less is known about the longitudinal perspective and the persistence of long hours or periods of underemployment. The annual hours of employees are examined over a five-year period to determine what proportion experience variable work years and how their well-being is affected.

    Release date: 2007-03-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060079272
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Despite continuing concerns that rising levels of foreign investment might lead to the hollowing-out of corporate Canada, there is little evidence that this was occurring. The number of head offices in Canada and their employment continued to rise, led by foreign-controlled firms.

    Release date: 2006-07-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2006014
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper provides an analysis of trends in business sector head office employment in Canada from 1999 to 2005. It investigates changes in the number of head offices and head office employment over this period. The paper also examines the effect of foreign ownership on head office employment. It asks how much foreign-controlled firms contribute to Canadian head office employment and employment growth and what happens to head office employment when control of a firm changes from domestic to foreign. The paper also looks at the rate at which head offices enter and exit over time with a view to ascertaining whether the loss of a head office is a rare occurrence or a relatively common event. Finally, the paper presents trends in head office employment across metropolitan areas over the past six years.

    Release date: 2006-07-13

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2005033
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The private, for-profit Education Services sector plays a key role in developing the knowledge and skills of the Canadian labour force. As awareness of the importance of lifelong learning has increased, so has interest in the contribution of private, for-profit Education Services to increasing skills and knowledge, productivity, innovation and competitiveness.

    Little statistical information, from either the supply or demand side of the Educational Services sector, is available in Canada. Several federal and provincial ministries, academic researchers and industry participants have expressed a need for more comprehensive statistical information on the sector. As the national statistical agency, Statistics Canada has an interest in filling these information needs.

    This report provides an overview of the Education Services sector in Canada. Drawing on available sources of statistical information, it also looks at whether it is possible to shed light on the size and characteristics of the private, for-profit Education Services sector.

    The study was funded by the Policy Research Initiative.

    Release date: 2005-07-20
Reference (2)

Reference (2) ((2 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 71-221-X
    Description:

    This electronic product provides information on all Workplace and Employee Survey (WES) variables, descriptions and response categories, as well as range of values. Starting with content themes, information is accessible through a hierarchical fashion, quickly guiding data users to variables of interest.

    Release date: 2007-05-17

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0026M2001003
    Description:

    Initial results from the Survey of Financial Security (SFS), which provides information on the net worth of Canadians, were released on March 15 2001, in The daily. The survey collected information on the value of the financial and non-financial assets owned by each family unit and on the amount of their debt.

    Statistics Canada is currently refining this initial estimate of net worth by adding to it an estimate of the value of benefits accrued in employer pension plans. This is an important addition to any asset and debt survey as, for many family units, it is likely to be one of the largest assets. With the aging of the population, information on pension accumulations is greatly needed to better understand the financial situation of those nearing retirement. These updated estimates of the Survey of Financial Security will be released in late fall 2001.

    The process for estimating the value of employer pension plan benefits is a complex one. This document describes the methodology for estimating that value, for the following groups: a) persons who belonged to an RPP at the time of the survey (referred to as current plan members); b) persons who had previously belonged to an RPP and either left the money in the plan or transferred it to a new plan; c) persons who are receiving RPP benefits.

    This methodology was proposed by Hubert Frenken and Michael Cohen. The former has many years of experience with Statistics Canada working with data on employer pension plans; the latter is a principal with the actuarial consulting firm William M. Mercer. Earlier this year, Statistics Canada carried out a public consultation on the proposed methodology. This report includes updates made as a result of feedback received from data users.

    Release date: 2001-09-05
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