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All (6)

All (6) ((6 results))

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211562
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article is based on the 2010 General Social Survey on Time Use. It examines how workers who report being highly stressed differ from those who report being somewhat stressed. Then it outlines the five main issues that highly stressed workers identified as their primary source of stress and compares their selected characteristics by source of stress - for instance, differences between workers who are anxious about work compared to those concerned about their finances or about a family situation.

    Release date: 2011-10-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100111366
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data from the different cycles of the General Social Survey from 2000 to 2008, this article explores the evolution of the popularity of working at home among employees and the self-employed. In particular, the characteristics of the workers most likely to work at home as well as the various reasons behind this phenomenon are studied. Perceptions about working at home and work-life balance are also discussed.

    Release date: 2010-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2008003
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using Statistics Canada's Business Register, this paper investigates the pattern of business establishments in each of the different census metropolitan and census agglomeration influenced zones across rural Canada.

    Release date: 2010-01-06

  • Table: 12F0080X
    Description:

    This publication presents a series of tabulations produced from the General Social Survey on time use of Canadians. It includes information on average amounts of time spent on various activities by sex, by age, by selected role groups.

    Release date: 2006-07-12

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20030028447
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article investigates gender dynamics in employment in Canada's culture sector. It explores various questions such as changes in female employment and characteristics of female participation in the workforce by various culture sub-sectors and activities.

    Release date: 2005-08-23

  • Articles and reports: 11F0024M20040007451
    Description:

    Our social contacts and networks influence many aspects of our lives. Both workers and employers use "social networks" in various ways. Information from personal and professional contacts may lead to a better "match" between a worker and a job than do hirings through purely formal means without access to information from personal contacts. This improved match may also lead to better job outcomes. Social networks could also been seen to be limiting or exclusive of some workers. This presentation discusses findings from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics on the use of personal and professional networks in obtaining work. Who uses social networks to find work? What types of work are obtained? Is there a relationship between the use of personal or professional contacts and job outcomes? These are questions of interest for workers, employers and professionals in human resources and employment services.

    Release date: 2004-11-25
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Table: 12F0080X
    Description:

    This publication presents a series of tabulations produced from the General Social Survey on time use of Canadians. It includes information on average amounts of time spent on various activities by sex, by age, by selected role groups.

    Release date: 2006-07-12
Analysis (5)

Analysis (5) ((5 results))

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211562
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article is based on the 2010 General Social Survey on Time Use. It examines how workers who report being highly stressed differ from those who report being somewhat stressed. Then it outlines the five main issues that highly stressed workers identified as their primary source of stress and compares their selected characteristics by source of stress - for instance, differences between workers who are anxious about work compared to those concerned about their finances or about a family situation.

    Release date: 2011-10-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100111366
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data from the different cycles of the General Social Survey from 2000 to 2008, this article explores the evolution of the popularity of working at home among employees and the self-employed. In particular, the characteristics of the workers most likely to work at home as well as the various reasons behind this phenomenon are studied. Perceptions about working at home and work-life balance are also discussed.

    Release date: 2010-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2008003
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using Statistics Canada's Business Register, this paper investigates the pattern of business establishments in each of the different census metropolitan and census agglomeration influenced zones across rural Canada.

    Release date: 2010-01-06

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20030028447
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article investigates gender dynamics in employment in Canada's culture sector. It explores various questions such as changes in female employment and characteristics of female participation in the workforce by various culture sub-sectors and activities.

    Release date: 2005-08-23

  • Articles and reports: 11F0024M20040007451
    Description:

    Our social contacts and networks influence many aspects of our lives. Both workers and employers use "social networks" in various ways. Information from personal and professional contacts may lead to a better "match" between a worker and a job than do hirings through purely formal means without access to information from personal contacts. This improved match may also lead to better job outcomes. Social networks could also been seen to be limiting or exclusive of some workers. This presentation discusses findings from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics on the use of personal and professional networks in obtaining work. Who uses social networks to find work? What types of work are obtained? Is there a relationship between the use of personal or professional contacts and job outcomes? These are questions of interest for workers, employers and professionals in human resources and employment services.

    Release date: 2004-11-25
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