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All (8)

All (8) ((8 results))

  • Table: 51-004-X
    Description:

    This bulletin presents the most up-to-date available information extracted from all of the Aviation Statistics Centre's surveys. Regular features include releases on principal statistics for Canada's major air carriers, airport data, fare basis statistics and traffic data for Canada's most important markets.

    Release date: 2019-06-13

  • Table: 51-004-X2015001
    Description:

    This publication provides quarterly information on operational and financial variables related to the scheduled and charter operations of all Canadian-licensed air carriers classified into reporting levels I and II. Operational data (passengers, passenger-kilometres, goods carried, goods tonne-kilometres, etc.) and financial data (operating revenues, operating expenses, employment expenses) are presented. This publication also includes data highlights and some financial performance indicators and productivity measures.

    Release date: 2015-02-18

  • Table: 51-004-X2014001
    Description:

    This publication provides quarterly information on operational and financial variables related to the scheduled and charter operations of all Canadian-licensed air carriers classified into reporting levels I and II. Operational data (passengers, passenger-kilometres, goods carried, goods tonne-kilometres, etc.) and financial data (operating revenues, operating expenses, employment expenses) are presented. This publication also includes data highlights and some financial performance indicators and productivity measures.

    Release date: 2014-02-07

  • Table: 50-002-X20030018636
    Description:

    To provide users with a complete picture of the financial and operational activities associated with Small For-hire Motor Carriers of Freight and Owner Operators in Canada.

    Release date: 2003-09-26

  • Table: 50-002-X20020018633
    Description:

    To provide users with a complete picture of the financial and operational activities associated with Small For-hire Motor Carriers of Freight in Canada.

    Release date: 2002-06-05

  • Table: 53F0002X
    Description:

    Nearly 50,000 or one in five (22%) Canadian truck drivers on the road in 1998 were independent truckers or "owner-operators". However, similar to other forms of self-employment, the net-earnings and socio-economic characteristics of owner-operators have often been ignored by researchers for reasons of analytical convenience or data limitations. New data products recently released by Statistics Canada such as the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) have the potential to fill much of this gap. The 1997 SLID cross-sectional micro-data files offer a limited but meaningful insight into the work patterns of the owner-operator population, complementing and validating well-established business surveys such as the annual Small for-hire carrier and Owner-operator Survey (SFO). The purpose of this study, through a multivariate analysis of the 1997 SLID and the 1997 SFO survey, was to compare the work patterns and backgrounds of owner-operators to company drivers (paid truck drivers employed by carriers). The study found that while drivers may choose to be self-employed to gain independence, owner-operators tend to work longer hours to meet fixed and variable costs, in return for lower after-tax earnings and a greater likelihood of high work-life stress. The analysis also found that the odds of self-employment among truckers were highest among drivers over 40 years of age with no post-secondary training.

    Release date: 2000-06-07

  • Articles and reports: 61-532-X19970013499
    Description:

    Issues affecting the transportation industry impact on the day to day concerns of Canadians. Changes in policy affecting transportation and trade have altered the landscape for the primary mode of commodity transport, trucking. Economic factors typically affecting the demand for trucking services are - the volume of production of goods for domestic and foreign consumption and exports and imports, interest rates and the value of the Canadian dollar. The supply of truck transport in turn is affected by the price of inputs, namely labour (drivers and helpers) and capital (straight trucks, road tractors and semi- and full-trailers). These variables are key determinants of the day to day activities of the industry.

    Release date: 1998-02-02

  • Articles and reports: 61-532-X19970013500
    Description:

    "If you've got it, a truck brought it." When you stop to think about it, an increasing number of the things we use are transported to market for at least part of the way, by truck. The trucking industry is becoming increasingly important to the transportation sector of the Canadian economy. This growing importance can be attributed to several factors including the deregulation of transportation, the surge in trade with the United States and the evolving structure of the industry itself. It is within this context that concern for labour issues, including a driver shortage, has been voiced. The demands on drivers have increased, driver training is inadequate and as a result, there is a perceived shortage of qualified drivers. This study examines employment in the trucking industry from 1988 to 1994 by looking at various sources of employment data at Statistics Canada.

    Release date: 1998-02-02
Data (6)

Data (6) ((6 results))

  • Table: 51-004-X
    Description:

    This bulletin presents the most up-to-date available information extracted from all of the Aviation Statistics Centre's surveys. Regular features include releases on principal statistics for Canada's major air carriers, airport data, fare basis statistics and traffic data for Canada's most important markets.

    Release date: 2019-06-13

  • Table: 51-004-X2015001
    Description:

    This publication provides quarterly information on operational and financial variables related to the scheduled and charter operations of all Canadian-licensed air carriers classified into reporting levels I and II. Operational data (passengers, passenger-kilometres, goods carried, goods tonne-kilometres, etc.) and financial data (operating revenues, operating expenses, employment expenses) are presented. This publication also includes data highlights and some financial performance indicators and productivity measures.

    Release date: 2015-02-18

  • Table: 51-004-X2014001
    Description:

    This publication provides quarterly information on operational and financial variables related to the scheduled and charter operations of all Canadian-licensed air carriers classified into reporting levels I and II. Operational data (passengers, passenger-kilometres, goods carried, goods tonne-kilometres, etc.) and financial data (operating revenues, operating expenses, employment expenses) are presented. This publication also includes data highlights and some financial performance indicators and productivity measures.

    Release date: 2014-02-07

  • Table: 50-002-X20030018636
    Description:

    To provide users with a complete picture of the financial and operational activities associated with Small For-hire Motor Carriers of Freight and Owner Operators in Canada.

    Release date: 2003-09-26

  • Table: 50-002-X20020018633
    Description:

    To provide users with a complete picture of the financial and operational activities associated with Small For-hire Motor Carriers of Freight in Canada.

    Release date: 2002-06-05

  • Table: 53F0002X
    Description:

    Nearly 50,000 or one in five (22%) Canadian truck drivers on the road in 1998 were independent truckers or "owner-operators". However, similar to other forms of self-employment, the net-earnings and socio-economic characteristics of owner-operators have often been ignored by researchers for reasons of analytical convenience or data limitations. New data products recently released by Statistics Canada such as the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) have the potential to fill much of this gap. The 1997 SLID cross-sectional micro-data files offer a limited but meaningful insight into the work patterns of the owner-operator population, complementing and validating well-established business surveys such as the annual Small for-hire carrier and Owner-operator Survey (SFO). The purpose of this study, through a multivariate analysis of the 1997 SLID and the 1997 SFO survey, was to compare the work patterns and backgrounds of owner-operators to company drivers (paid truck drivers employed by carriers). The study found that while drivers may choose to be self-employed to gain independence, owner-operators tend to work longer hours to meet fixed and variable costs, in return for lower after-tax earnings and a greater likelihood of high work-life stress. The analysis also found that the odds of self-employment among truckers were highest among drivers over 40 years of age with no post-secondary training.

    Release date: 2000-06-07
Analysis (3)

Analysis (3) ((3 results))

  • Table: 51-004-X
    Description:

    This bulletin presents the most up-to-date available information extracted from all of the Aviation Statistics Centre's surveys. Regular features include releases on principal statistics for Canada's major air carriers, airport data, fare basis statistics and traffic data for Canada's most important markets.

    Release date: 2019-06-13

  • Articles and reports: 61-532-X19970013499
    Description:

    Issues affecting the transportation industry impact on the day to day concerns of Canadians. Changes in policy affecting transportation and trade have altered the landscape for the primary mode of commodity transport, trucking. Economic factors typically affecting the demand for trucking services are - the volume of production of goods for domestic and foreign consumption and exports and imports, interest rates and the value of the Canadian dollar. The supply of truck transport in turn is affected by the price of inputs, namely labour (drivers and helpers) and capital (straight trucks, road tractors and semi- and full-trailers). These variables are key determinants of the day to day activities of the industry.

    Release date: 1998-02-02

  • Articles and reports: 61-532-X19970013500
    Description:

    "If you've got it, a truck brought it." When you stop to think about it, an increasing number of the things we use are transported to market for at least part of the way, by truck. The trucking industry is becoming increasingly important to the transportation sector of the Canadian economy. This growing importance can be attributed to several factors including the deregulation of transportation, the surge in trade with the United States and the evolving structure of the industry itself. It is within this context that concern for labour issues, including a driver shortage, has been voiced. The demands on drivers have increased, driver training is inadequate and as a result, there is a perceived shortage of qualified drivers. This study examines employment in the trucking industry from 1988 to 1994 by looking at various sources of employment data at Statistics Canada.

    Release date: 1998-02-02
Reference (0)

Reference (0) (0 results)

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