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All (11) (0 to 10 of 11 results)

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2009002
    Description:

    This working paper highlights a variety of aspects of innovation in the Canadian manufacturing sector, including incidence and types of innovation, novelty of innovation, innovation activities, sources of information contributing to innovation, cooperation with innovation partners, impacts of innovation, obstacles to innovation, use of government programs, intellectual property protection, and suppliers to innovative manufacturing plants.

    Release date: 2009-08-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005258
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper uses firm-level data from the T2/LEAP to investigate whether the link between tariff changes and employment differed across firms with various productivity and leverage characteristics over the period 1988 to 1994. The results suggest that the combined effect of domestic and U.S. tariff reductions on employment was typically small, but that losses were significantly larger for firms which were less productive. For instance, firms with average productivity in 1988 responded to tariff changes by cutting employment by only 3.6% over the period 1988 to 1994, while lower productivity firms typically shed 15.1% of their workforce over the same period. This paper also indicates that firms which were more heavily in debt downsized more in response to declining domestic tariffs, suggesting that financial constrains became more binding when tariff cuts were implemented. These results suggest that firms with high productivity and low leverage were less likely than others to feel the impact of declining U.S. and domestic tariffs.

    Release date: 2005-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005259
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article summarizes findings from the research paper entitled: Tariff Reduction and Employment in Canadian Manufacturing, 1988-1994. At the end of the 1980s, Canada and the United States reached an agreement to phase out import tariffs over a 10-year period beginning January 1st, 1989. This tariff reduction scheme was a major centre-piece of the Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement (FTA). The implementation of the FTA was followed by a recession, characterized by massive job cuts in manufacturing industries, which led to suggestions that employment losses were related to the reduction of trade barriers. Research on firm output and survival (Gu, Sawchuk and Whewell, 2003; Baggs, 2004) suggests the impact of tariff changes was different across industries and across firms within industries. Using firm-level data, this study investigates the impact of reduced Canadian and U.S. tariffs on Canadian manufacturing employment. The study also asks whether the impact was heterogeneous across firms with various productivity and leverage characteristics.

    Release date: 2005-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2005034
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines head office employment in the Canadian manufacturing sector. It focuses on the characteristics that are related to the creation of a head office and the amount of employment in that head office. Among the characteristics investigated are firm size, number of plants, industrial diversity, geographical location, industry and nationality. The paper finds that foreign-owned firms are more likely to create a head office and to create more employment in their head offices than are domestic-controlled firms, after controlling for firm characteristics. It also finds that head office creation and employment levels are associated with a firm's level of complexity (e.g., its size) and how it organises its production geographically.

    Release date: 2005-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2004022
    Description:

    This working paper examines whether the innovative characteristics of small manufacturing firms that show high growth are significantly different from those of other types of small manufacturing firms. Two groups of small firms are analysed: those with 20 to 49 employees and those with 50 to 99 employees in 1997.

    The data analysed in this paper are from the Survey of Innovation 1999, which surveyed manufacturing provincial enterprises with at least 20 employees and at least $250,000 in revenues. Data from the Survey of Innovation 1999 has been linked to the Annual Survey of Manufactures for 1997 and 1999, and the growth of firms was determined based on this data. Eight different indicators of the innovative characteristics of small firms are presented.

    Release date: 2004-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2002003
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines small producers in the Canadian and U.S. manufacturing sectors in terms of output and employment from the early 1970s to the late 1990s.

    Release date: 2002-05-23

  • 7. Coal Mining Archived
    Table: 26-206-X
    Description:

    The report presents data on the number of mines, employment, payroll, the cost of fuel including electricity, materials and supplies, production, disposition, exports and imports, and the supply and demand of coal by province. It also includes a bibliography. as well as selected non-mining inputs by type; selected non-mining outputs; coal mines; industry value by type of revenues; marketing expenses by type.

    Release date: 2002-03-25

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2001013
    Description:

    The Survey of Innovation 1999 was conducted in the fall of 1999. It surveyed manufacturing and was the first innovation survey of selected natural resource industries. This is the second in a series of working papers that will examine the results from the Survey of Innovation 1999. This second paper examines innovative manufacturing firms at the provincial level. It includes descriptive statistics and statistical tables for selected questions from the survey.

    Release date: 2001-09-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2000122
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines how several factors contribute to innovative activity in the Canadian manufacturing sector. First, it investigates the extent to which intellectual property right protection stimulates innovation. Second, it examines the contribution that R&D makes to innovation. Third, it considers the importance of various competencies in the area of marketing, human resource, technology and production to the innovation process. Fourth, it examines the extent to which a larger firm size and less competition serve to stimulate competition-the so-called Schumpeterian hypothesis. Fifth, the effect of the nationality of a firm on innovation is also investigated. Finally, the paper examines the effect of an industry's environment on a firm's ability to innovate.

    Several findings are of note. First, the relationship between innovation and patent use is found to be much stronger going from innovation to patent use than from patent use to innovation. Firms that innovate take out patents; but firms and industries that make more intensive use of patents do not tend to produce more innovations. Second, while R&D is important, developing capabilities in other areas, such as technological competency and marketing, is also important. Third, size effects are significant. The largest firms tend to be more innovative. As for competition, intermediate levels of competition are the most conducive to innovation. Fourth, foreign-controlled firms are not significantly more likely to innovate than domestic-controlled firms once differences in competencies have been taken into account. Fifth, the scientific infrastructure provided by university research is a significant determinant of innovation.

    Release date: 2000-03-07

  • Journals and periodicals: 88-518-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The food-processing industry benefits from a wide a range of new advanced technologies. Technological advances include computer-based information and control systems, as well as sophisticated processing and packaging methods that enhance product quality, improve food safety and reduce costs. Continuous quality improvement and benchmarking are examples of related business practices.

    This study examines the use of advanced technologies in the food-processing industry. It focuses not just on the incidence and intensity of use of these new technologies but also on the way technology relates to overall firm strategy. It also examines how technology use is affected by selected industry structural characteristics and how the adoption of technologies affects the performance of firms. It considers as well how the environment influences technological change. The nature and structure of the industry are shown to condition the competitive environment, the business strategies that are pursued, product characteristics and the role of technology.

    Firms make strategic choices in light of technological opportunities and the risks and opportunities provided by their competitive environments. They implement strategies through appropriate business practices and activities, including the development of core competencies in the areas of marketing, production and human resources, as well as technology. Firms that differ in size and nationality choose to pursue different technological strategies. This study focuses on how these differences are reflected in the different use of technology for large and small establishments, for foreign and domestic plants and for plants in different industries.

    Release date: 1999-12-20
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • 1. Coal Mining Archived
    Table: 26-206-X
    Description:

    The report presents data on the number of mines, employment, payroll, the cost of fuel including electricity, materials and supplies, production, disposition, exports and imports, and the supply and demand of coal by province. It also includes a bibliography. as well as selected non-mining inputs by type; selected non-mining outputs; coal mines; industry value by type of revenues; marketing expenses by type.

    Release date: 2002-03-25
Analysis (10)

Analysis (10) ((10 results))

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2009002
    Description:

    This working paper highlights a variety of aspects of innovation in the Canadian manufacturing sector, including incidence and types of innovation, novelty of innovation, innovation activities, sources of information contributing to innovation, cooperation with innovation partners, impacts of innovation, obstacles to innovation, use of government programs, intellectual property protection, and suppliers to innovative manufacturing plants.

    Release date: 2009-08-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005258
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper uses firm-level data from the T2/LEAP to investigate whether the link between tariff changes and employment differed across firms with various productivity and leverage characteristics over the period 1988 to 1994. The results suggest that the combined effect of domestic and U.S. tariff reductions on employment was typically small, but that losses were significantly larger for firms which were less productive. For instance, firms with average productivity in 1988 responded to tariff changes by cutting employment by only 3.6% over the period 1988 to 1994, while lower productivity firms typically shed 15.1% of their workforce over the same period. This paper also indicates that firms which were more heavily in debt downsized more in response to declining domestic tariffs, suggesting that financial constrains became more binding when tariff cuts were implemented. These results suggest that firms with high productivity and low leverage were less likely than others to feel the impact of declining U.S. and domestic tariffs.

    Release date: 2005-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005259
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article summarizes findings from the research paper entitled: Tariff Reduction and Employment in Canadian Manufacturing, 1988-1994. At the end of the 1980s, Canada and the United States reached an agreement to phase out import tariffs over a 10-year period beginning January 1st, 1989. This tariff reduction scheme was a major centre-piece of the Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement (FTA). The implementation of the FTA was followed by a recession, characterized by massive job cuts in manufacturing industries, which led to suggestions that employment losses were related to the reduction of trade barriers. Research on firm output and survival (Gu, Sawchuk and Whewell, 2003; Baggs, 2004) suggests the impact of tariff changes was different across industries and across firms within industries. Using firm-level data, this study investigates the impact of reduced Canadian and U.S. tariffs on Canadian manufacturing employment. The study also asks whether the impact was heterogeneous across firms with various productivity and leverage characteristics.

    Release date: 2005-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2005034
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines head office employment in the Canadian manufacturing sector. It focuses on the characteristics that are related to the creation of a head office and the amount of employment in that head office. Among the characteristics investigated are firm size, number of plants, industrial diversity, geographical location, industry and nationality. The paper finds that foreign-owned firms are more likely to create a head office and to create more employment in their head offices than are domestic-controlled firms, after controlling for firm characteristics. It also finds that head office creation and employment levels are associated with a firm's level of complexity (e.g., its size) and how it organises its production geographically.

    Release date: 2005-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2004022
    Description:

    This working paper examines whether the innovative characteristics of small manufacturing firms that show high growth are significantly different from those of other types of small manufacturing firms. Two groups of small firms are analysed: those with 20 to 49 employees and those with 50 to 99 employees in 1997.

    The data analysed in this paper are from the Survey of Innovation 1999, which surveyed manufacturing provincial enterprises with at least 20 employees and at least $250,000 in revenues. Data from the Survey of Innovation 1999 has been linked to the Annual Survey of Manufactures for 1997 and 1999, and the growth of firms was determined based on this data. Eight different indicators of the innovative characteristics of small firms are presented.

    Release date: 2004-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2002003
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines small producers in the Canadian and U.S. manufacturing sectors in terms of output and employment from the early 1970s to the late 1990s.

    Release date: 2002-05-23

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2001013
    Description:

    The Survey of Innovation 1999 was conducted in the fall of 1999. It surveyed manufacturing and was the first innovation survey of selected natural resource industries. This is the second in a series of working papers that will examine the results from the Survey of Innovation 1999. This second paper examines innovative manufacturing firms at the provincial level. It includes descriptive statistics and statistical tables for selected questions from the survey.

    Release date: 2001-09-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2000122
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines how several factors contribute to innovative activity in the Canadian manufacturing sector. First, it investigates the extent to which intellectual property right protection stimulates innovation. Second, it examines the contribution that R&D makes to innovation. Third, it considers the importance of various competencies in the area of marketing, human resource, technology and production to the innovation process. Fourth, it examines the extent to which a larger firm size and less competition serve to stimulate competition-the so-called Schumpeterian hypothesis. Fifth, the effect of the nationality of a firm on innovation is also investigated. Finally, the paper examines the effect of an industry's environment on a firm's ability to innovate.

    Several findings are of note. First, the relationship between innovation and patent use is found to be much stronger going from innovation to patent use than from patent use to innovation. Firms that innovate take out patents; but firms and industries that make more intensive use of patents do not tend to produce more innovations. Second, while R&D is important, developing capabilities in other areas, such as technological competency and marketing, is also important. Third, size effects are significant. The largest firms tend to be more innovative. As for competition, intermediate levels of competition are the most conducive to innovation. Fourth, foreign-controlled firms are not significantly more likely to innovate than domestic-controlled firms once differences in competencies have been taken into account. Fifth, the scientific infrastructure provided by university research is a significant determinant of innovation.

    Release date: 2000-03-07

  • Journals and periodicals: 88-518-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The food-processing industry benefits from a wide a range of new advanced technologies. Technological advances include computer-based information and control systems, as well as sophisticated processing and packaging methods that enhance product quality, improve food safety and reduce costs. Continuous quality improvement and benchmarking are examples of related business practices.

    This study examines the use of advanced technologies in the food-processing industry. It focuses not just on the incidence and intensity of use of these new technologies but also on the way technology relates to overall firm strategy. It also examines how technology use is affected by selected industry structural characteristics and how the adoption of technologies affects the performance of firms. It considers as well how the environment influences technological change. The nature and structure of the industry are shown to condition the competitive environment, the business strategies that are pursued, product characteristics and the role of technology.

    Firms make strategic choices in light of technological opportunities and the risks and opportunities provided by their competitive environments. They implement strategies through appropriate business practices and activities, including the development of core competencies in the areas of marketing, production and human resources, as well as technology. Firms that differ in size and nationality choose to pursue different technological strategies. This study focuses on how these differences are reflected in the different use of technology for large and small establishments, for foreign and domestic plants and for plants in different industries.

    Release date: 1999-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1998119
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examines differences in technology use in Canada as opposed to the United States as well as reasons for these differences. It examines different aspects of technology use-numbers of technologies used, types of technologies used, as well as regional, size and industry variations in their use. It then investigates differences in benefits that plant managers perceive stem from advanced technology use and differences in the factors that managers assess as impediments. While managers in both countries generally place quite similar emphases on items in the list of benefits received and problems that have impeded adoption, there are significant differences that arise because of the smaller size of the Canadian market.

    Release date: 1999-04-07
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