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  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2008066
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory, Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This study examines the geographic evolution of employment in the Canada's federal core public administration from 1995 to 2006. Evolution of the number of employees in knowledge-based and less knowledge-based occupations and by gender is examined by province, territory and for the National Capital Region. For purpose of comparison, the trends in the general federal government are discussed.

    Release date: 2008-01-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2006039
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) this study examines the labour market experience of Canadians who hold a university diploma and who worked at least one month in a job requiring no more than a high school diploma between 1993 and 2001.

    Release date: 2006-04-06

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005258
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper uses firm-level data from the T2/LEAP to investigate whether the link between tariff changes and employment differed across firms with various productivity and leverage characteristics over the period 1988 to 1994. The results suggest that the combined effect of domestic and U.S. tariff reductions on employment was typically small, but that losses were significantly larger for firms which were less productive. For instance, firms with average productivity in 1988 responded to tariff changes by cutting employment by only 3.6% over the period 1988 to 1994, while lower productivity firms typically shed 15.1% of their workforce over the same period. This paper also indicates that firms which were more heavily in debt downsized more in response to declining domestic tariffs, suggesting that financial constrains became more binding when tariff cuts were implemented. These results suggest that firms with high productivity and low leverage were less likely than others to feel the impact of declining U.S. and domestic tariffs.

    Release date: 2005-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005259
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article summarizes findings from the research paper entitled: Tariff Reduction and Employment in Canadian Manufacturing, 1988-1994. At the end of the 1980s, Canada and the United States reached an agreement to phase out import tariffs over a 10-year period beginning January 1st, 1989. This tariff reduction scheme was a major centre-piece of the Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement (FTA). The implementation of the FTA was followed by a recession, characterized by massive job cuts in manufacturing industries, which led to suggestions that employment losses were related to the reduction of trade barriers. Research on firm output and survival (Gu, Sawchuk and Whewell, 2003; Baggs, 2004) suggests the impact of tariff changes was different across industries and across firms within industries. Using firm-level data, this study investigates the impact of reduced Canadian and U.S. tariffs on Canadian manufacturing employment. The study also asks whether the impact was heterogeneous across firms with various productivity and leverage characteristics.

    Release date: 2005-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 61-532-X19970013499
    Description:

    Issues affecting the transportation industry impact on the day to day concerns of Canadians. Changes in policy affecting transportation and trade have altered the landscape for the primary mode of commodity transport, trucking. Economic factors typically affecting the demand for trucking services are - the volume of production of goods for domestic and foreign consumption and exports and imports, interest rates and the value of the Canadian dollar. The supply of truck transport in turn is affected by the price of inputs, namely labour (drivers and helpers) and capital (straight trucks, road tractors and semi- and full-trailers). These variables are key determinants of the day to day activities of the industry.

    Release date: 1998-02-02

  • Articles and reports: 61-532-X19970013500
    Description:

    "If you've got it, a truck brought it." When you stop to think about it, an increasing number of the things we use are transported to market for at least part of the way, by truck. The trucking industry is becoming increasingly important to the transportation sector of the Canadian economy. This growing importance can be attributed to several factors including the deregulation of transportation, the surge in trade with the United States and the evolving structure of the industry itself. It is within this context that concern for labour issues, including a driver shortage, has been voiced. The demands on drivers have increased, driver training is inadequate and as a result, there is a perceived shortage of qualified drivers. This study examines employment in the trucking industry from 1988 to 1994 by looking at various sources of employment data at Statistics Canada.

    Release date: 1998-02-02
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Analysis (6)

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  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2008066
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory, Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This study examines the geographic evolution of employment in the Canada's federal core public administration from 1995 to 2006. Evolution of the number of employees in knowledge-based and less knowledge-based occupations and by gender is examined by province, territory and for the National Capital Region. For purpose of comparison, the trends in the general federal government are discussed.

    Release date: 2008-01-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2006039
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) this study examines the labour market experience of Canadians who hold a university diploma and who worked at least one month in a job requiring no more than a high school diploma between 1993 and 2001.

    Release date: 2006-04-06

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005258
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper uses firm-level data from the T2/LEAP to investigate whether the link between tariff changes and employment differed across firms with various productivity and leverage characteristics over the period 1988 to 1994. The results suggest that the combined effect of domestic and U.S. tariff reductions on employment was typically small, but that losses were significantly larger for firms which were less productive. For instance, firms with average productivity in 1988 responded to tariff changes by cutting employment by only 3.6% over the period 1988 to 1994, while lower productivity firms typically shed 15.1% of their workforce over the same period. This paper also indicates that firms which were more heavily in debt downsized more in response to declining domestic tariffs, suggesting that financial constrains became more binding when tariff cuts were implemented. These results suggest that firms with high productivity and low leverage were less likely than others to feel the impact of declining U.S. and domestic tariffs.

    Release date: 2005-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005259
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article summarizes findings from the research paper entitled: Tariff Reduction and Employment in Canadian Manufacturing, 1988-1994. At the end of the 1980s, Canada and the United States reached an agreement to phase out import tariffs over a 10-year period beginning January 1st, 1989. This tariff reduction scheme was a major centre-piece of the Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement (FTA). The implementation of the FTA was followed by a recession, characterized by massive job cuts in manufacturing industries, which led to suggestions that employment losses were related to the reduction of trade barriers. Research on firm output and survival (Gu, Sawchuk and Whewell, 2003; Baggs, 2004) suggests the impact of tariff changes was different across industries and across firms within industries. Using firm-level data, this study investigates the impact of reduced Canadian and U.S. tariffs on Canadian manufacturing employment. The study also asks whether the impact was heterogeneous across firms with various productivity and leverage characteristics.

    Release date: 2005-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 61-532-X19970013499
    Description:

    Issues affecting the transportation industry impact on the day to day concerns of Canadians. Changes in policy affecting transportation and trade have altered the landscape for the primary mode of commodity transport, trucking. Economic factors typically affecting the demand for trucking services are - the volume of production of goods for domestic and foreign consumption and exports and imports, interest rates and the value of the Canadian dollar. The supply of truck transport in turn is affected by the price of inputs, namely labour (drivers and helpers) and capital (straight trucks, road tractors and semi- and full-trailers). These variables are key determinants of the day to day activities of the industry.

    Release date: 1998-02-02

  • Articles and reports: 61-532-X19970013500
    Description:

    "If you've got it, a truck brought it." When you stop to think about it, an increasing number of the things we use are transported to market for at least part of the way, by truck. The trucking industry is becoming increasingly important to the transportation sector of the Canadian economy. This growing importance can be attributed to several factors including the deregulation of transportation, the surge in trade with the United States and the evolving structure of the industry itself. It is within this context that concern for labour issues, including a driver shortage, has been voiced. The demands on drivers have increased, driver training is inadequate and as a result, there is a perceived shortage of qualified drivers. This study examines employment in the trucking industry from 1988 to 1994 by looking at various sources of employment data at Statistics Canada.

    Release date: 1998-02-02
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