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All (11) (0 to 10 of 11 results)

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X19980087984
    Description:

    This release provides data on the Research and development activities of the private nonprofit sector.

    Release date: 1998-11-30

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1995002
    Description:

    This paper is the second of a two-part series on business services and their role in the Canadian economy. It provides a detailed industrial and geographical profile of employment, illustrates its composition and major characteristics and analyzes its sources of growth by type, gender, occupation, education and other features.

    Business services is a dynamic sector with impressive employment growth, considerably higher than the economy average. Growth has been particularly strong in self-employment, part-time and female employment. Much of the growth in employment originates in the computer services industry. The proportion of managerial and professional positions has been growing relative to clerical ones. Employment is heavily concentrated in urban centres. Individuals employed in these industries are better educated and better paid than the average worker.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1998016
    Description:

    This article looks at the rapid growth of the architectural, engineering and other scientific and technical services (AES) industry and, when possible, its three sub-industries, from 1982 to 1994. Industry growth, employment and remuneration patterns are compared to those in the overall Canadian economy. The article also examines characteristics of the AES industry's workforce, particularly the employees' education qualifications, occupations and demographic characteristics.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1998128
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    We provide recent evidence on job characteristics by firm size in Canada. Using a variety of household surveys, we assemble a wide set of facts on wages, fringe benefits and work schedules in small and large firms. We show that the wage gap between small and large firms has reamined fairly stable over the past decade. After controlling for observable worker characteristics and industry-specific effects, large firms pay 15-20% more than small firms. Pension plan coverage remains at least four times higher in large firms than in small firms. While the gap in pension coverage between small and large firms has not increased over time for men, there is some evidence that it has increased for women. We assess the extent to which work schedules vary between small and large firms. Our results indicate that compared to workers in large firms, employees of small firms work at least as many weekly hours. Furthermore, they are more likely to work more than five days per week. This implies that the firm size wage premium cannot be explained by a longer workweek in large firms. As long as workers prefer working during the day, the greater frequency of shift work in large, goods-producing companies is one dimension along which work schedules are less desirable in large firms. According to the theory of compensating differentials, the size-wage differential may partially reflect the willingness of large firms to compensate workers for shift work. We test this hypothesis and conclude that shift work has virtually no effect on the firm size wage premium. Our results emphasize the need to look at several dimensions of work to assess how job quality varies between small and large firms.

    Release date: 1998-11-13

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1998019
    Description:

    This paper demonstrates the extent to which jobs are simultaneously created and eliminated in service industries. This job reallocation tends to be higher in knowledge- and information-intensive industries such as business services. However, job reallocation patterns are not necessarily similar across all dynamic industries. This is largely because of differences between various industries': markets; regulatory environments; and abilities to absorb displaced workers into the production of new goods and services. The study further illustrates that high job reallocation causes significant movement of workers between firms and industries, and that this has important implications for training and knowledge flows in the economy.

    Release date: 1998-10-28

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X1997014
    Description:

    Statistics Canada is engaged in a project "Information System for Science and Technology" which purpose is to develop useful indicators of activity and a framework to tie them together into a coherent picture of science and technology (S&T) in Canada. The Working papers series is used to publish results of the different initiatives conducted within this project. The produced data are related to the activities, linkages and outcomes of S&T. Several key areas are covered such as: innovation, technology diffusion, human resources in S&T and interrelations between different actors involved in S&T. This series also presents important data tabulations taken from regular surveys on R&D and S&T and made possible because of the existing Project.

    Release date: 1998-09-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19980033944
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Labour Force Survey data show that most of the recent decline in labour force participation is attributable to the upswing in school attendance and the trend toward earlier retirement.

    Release date: 1998-09-09

  • Table: 16F0003X
    Description:

    This report presents results of the Waste Management Industry Survey, 1995, which gathered information on the financial characteristics and waste management activities undertaken in the business sector.

    Release date: 1998-07-23

  • Table: 56-001-X19980025195
    Description:

    Total broadcasting revenue of the private sector was $2,574.9 million compared to $2,391.6 million in 1996, an increase of 7.7%. Total expenses for private stations which include departmental, depreciation and interest expenses increased 3.4% to $2,337.4 million from $2,261.0 million in 1996.

    Release date: 1998-07-14

  • Articles and reports: 61-532-X19970013499
    Description:

    Issues affecting the transportation industry impact on the day to day concerns of Canadians. Changes in policy affecting transportation and trade have altered the landscape for the primary mode of commodity transport, trucking. Economic factors typically affecting the demand for trucking services are - the volume of production of goods for domestic and foreign consumption and exports and imports, interest rates and the value of the Canadian dollar. The supply of truck transport in turn is affected by the price of inputs, namely labour (drivers and helpers) and capital (straight trucks, road tractors and semi- and full-trailers). These variables are key determinants of the day to day activities of the industry.

    Release date: 1998-02-02
Data (2)

Data (2) ((2 results))

  • Table: 16F0003X
    Description:

    This report presents results of the Waste Management Industry Survey, 1995, which gathered information on the financial characteristics and waste management activities undertaken in the business sector.

    Release date: 1998-07-23

  • Table: 56-001-X19980025195
    Description:

    Total broadcasting revenue of the private sector was $2,574.9 million compared to $2,391.6 million in 1996, an increase of 7.7%. Total expenses for private stations which include departmental, depreciation and interest expenses increased 3.4% to $2,337.4 million from $2,261.0 million in 1996.

    Release date: 1998-07-14
Analysis (9)

Analysis (9) ((9 results))

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X19980087984
    Description:

    This release provides data on the Research and development activities of the private nonprofit sector.

    Release date: 1998-11-30

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1995002
    Description:

    This paper is the second of a two-part series on business services and their role in the Canadian economy. It provides a detailed industrial and geographical profile of employment, illustrates its composition and major characteristics and analyzes its sources of growth by type, gender, occupation, education and other features.

    Business services is a dynamic sector with impressive employment growth, considerably higher than the economy average. Growth has been particularly strong in self-employment, part-time and female employment. Much of the growth in employment originates in the computer services industry. The proportion of managerial and professional positions has been growing relative to clerical ones. Employment is heavily concentrated in urban centres. Individuals employed in these industries are better educated and better paid than the average worker.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1998016
    Description:

    This article looks at the rapid growth of the architectural, engineering and other scientific and technical services (AES) industry and, when possible, its three sub-industries, from 1982 to 1994. Industry growth, employment and remuneration patterns are compared to those in the overall Canadian economy. The article also examines characteristics of the AES industry's workforce, particularly the employees' education qualifications, occupations and demographic characteristics.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1998128
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    We provide recent evidence on job characteristics by firm size in Canada. Using a variety of household surveys, we assemble a wide set of facts on wages, fringe benefits and work schedules in small and large firms. We show that the wage gap between small and large firms has reamined fairly stable over the past decade. After controlling for observable worker characteristics and industry-specific effects, large firms pay 15-20% more than small firms. Pension plan coverage remains at least four times higher in large firms than in small firms. While the gap in pension coverage between small and large firms has not increased over time for men, there is some evidence that it has increased for women. We assess the extent to which work schedules vary between small and large firms. Our results indicate that compared to workers in large firms, employees of small firms work at least as many weekly hours. Furthermore, they are more likely to work more than five days per week. This implies that the firm size wage premium cannot be explained by a longer workweek in large firms. As long as workers prefer working during the day, the greater frequency of shift work in large, goods-producing companies is one dimension along which work schedules are less desirable in large firms. According to the theory of compensating differentials, the size-wage differential may partially reflect the willingness of large firms to compensate workers for shift work. We test this hypothesis and conclude that shift work has virtually no effect on the firm size wage premium. Our results emphasize the need to look at several dimensions of work to assess how job quality varies between small and large firms.

    Release date: 1998-11-13

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1998019
    Description:

    This paper demonstrates the extent to which jobs are simultaneously created and eliminated in service industries. This job reallocation tends to be higher in knowledge- and information-intensive industries such as business services. However, job reallocation patterns are not necessarily similar across all dynamic industries. This is largely because of differences between various industries': markets; regulatory environments; and abilities to absorb displaced workers into the production of new goods and services. The study further illustrates that high job reallocation causes significant movement of workers between firms and industries, and that this has important implications for training and knowledge flows in the economy.

    Release date: 1998-10-28

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X1997014
    Description:

    Statistics Canada is engaged in a project "Information System for Science and Technology" which purpose is to develop useful indicators of activity and a framework to tie them together into a coherent picture of science and technology (S&T) in Canada. The Working papers series is used to publish results of the different initiatives conducted within this project. The produced data are related to the activities, linkages and outcomes of S&T. Several key areas are covered such as: innovation, technology diffusion, human resources in S&T and interrelations between different actors involved in S&T. This series also presents important data tabulations taken from regular surveys on R&D and S&T and made possible because of the existing Project.

    Release date: 1998-09-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19980033944
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Labour Force Survey data show that most of the recent decline in labour force participation is attributable to the upswing in school attendance and the trend toward earlier retirement.

    Release date: 1998-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 61-532-X19970013499
    Description:

    Issues affecting the transportation industry impact on the day to day concerns of Canadians. Changes in policy affecting transportation and trade have altered the landscape for the primary mode of commodity transport, trucking. Economic factors typically affecting the demand for trucking services are - the volume of production of goods for domestic and foreign consumption and exports and imports, interest rates and the value of the Canadian dollar. The supply of truck transport in turn is affected by the price of inputs, namely labour (drivers and helpers) and capital (straight trucks, road tractors and semi- and full-trailers). These variables are key determinants of the day to day activities of the industry.

    Release date: 1998-02-02

  • Articles and reports: 61-532-X19970013500
    Description:

    "If you've got it, a truck brought it." When you stop to think about it, an increasing number of the things we use are transported to market for at least part of the way, by truck. The trucking industry is becoming increasingly important to the transportation sector of the Canadian economy. This growing importance can be attributed to several factors including the deregulation of transportation, the surge in trade with the United States and the evolving structure of the industry itself. It is within this context that concern for labour issues, including a driver shortage, has been voiced. The demands on drivers have increased, driver training is inadequate and as a result, there is a perceived shortage of qualified drivers. This study examines employment in the trucking industry from 1988 to 1994 by looking at various sources of employment data at Statistics Canada.

    Release date: 1998-02-02
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