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All (28) (0 to 10 of 28 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2015366
    Description:

    Canada and the United States have recently experienced an increase in the regional dispersion of entering immigrants. American research suggests that a mixture of economic push factors (away from states like California) and pull factors (toward states with growth of low-wage jobs), as well as changing government policies and regulations contributed to the development of the ‘New Gateways.’ Very few studies have been conducted to determine why the regional dispersion of entering immigrants occurred in Canada. This paper assesses the relative importance of immigrant selection programs and immigrant source regions in accounting for changes in the regional dispersion of entering immigrants during the 2000s.

    Release date: 2015-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X200400010665
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In this article, the authors analyze the migration flows of Canadians between 2001 and 2006 using the 2006 Census data. First, the major internal migration movements are described at various geographic levels. The results can show certain phenomena that have marked the 2001-2006 intercensal period, such as the overall decline in mobility, the attraction exercised by Alberta, the urban expansion and the outflow of young people from rural areas. Second, various migrant characteristics are examined using a multivariate statistical model including several types of destination. The results help better understand the socio-demographic characteristics associated with mobility status, such as age, marital status, education, family structure or immigrant status.

    Release date: 2008-07-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200701210464
    Geography: Geographical region of Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines whether cross-border shopping has taken flight with the loonie. It finds that measured by the number of trips to the US, the average spent per trip or even online purchases, the recent increase in cross-border shopping has been minimal, especially outside of Ontario. More notable is the drop in US visitors to Canada. Meanwhile, overseas travel in and out of Canada continues to grow rapidly.

    Release date: 2007-12-13

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2005005
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This bulletin examines the number and characteristics of travellers to rural Canada in 2002 in order to develop an initial understanding.

    Release date: 2005-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005254
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examines changes in the geographic concentration of Canada's major immigrant groups, with respect to their initial destination and subsequent redistribution during the past two decades. At the same time, it examines the role of pre-existing immigrant communities in determining immigrants' locational choices. The results show a large rise in concentration levels at the initial destination among major immigrant groups throughout the 1970s and 1980s; this subsided in the following decade. Redistribution after immigration was generally small-scale, and had inconsistent effects on changing concentration at initial destinations among immigrant groups and across arrival cohorts within an immigrant group. Even for immigrant and refugee groups whose initial settlement was strongly influenced by government intervention, redistribution only partly altered general geographic distribution. Finally, this study finds that the size of the pre-existing immigrant community is not a significant factor in immigrant locational choice when location fixed effects are accounted for.

    Release date: 2005-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005255
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article summarizes findings from the research paper entitled: The Initial Destinations and Redistribution of Canada's Major Immigrant Groups: Changes over the Past Two Decades. In 1981, about 58% of immigrants who had come to Canada in the previous 10 years lived in Toronto, Vancouver, and Montréal; by 2001, this had increased to 74% (Statistics Canada 2003), triggering debate on the merits of a more 'balanced geographic distribution of immigrants' (Citizenship and Immigration Canada-CIC 2001). Policies aimed at directing immigrants away from major gateway cities in many western countries have focused on the choice of initial destination, and little effort has been made to affect subsequent mobility. But such policies will work only if other, non-gateway regions, can keep immigrants or maintain balanced in- and out-migration. To this end, this study examines how Canada's major immigrant groups arriving over the past two decades have altered their geographic concentration through time, comparing immigrants arriving in the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s, in the concentration levels of their initial destinations, and in their subsequent geographic dispersal. It pays attention to the dispersal pattern of groups whose initial settlements were influenced by government policies and questions the role of pre-existing immigrant communities in geographic distribution.

    Release date: 2005-06-29

  • 51C0008
    Description:

    Number of aircraft movements which took place at Canadian airports by time and date of arrival and departure, airport of origin or destination of aircraft, aircraft size and type, type of service, air carrier and runway used.

    Release date: 2005-04-01

  • Articles and reports: 91F0015M2004006
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The paper assesses and compares new and old methodologies for official estimates of migration within and among provinces and territories for the period 1996/97 to 2000/01.

    Release date: 2004-06-17

  • Journals and periodicals: 54F0001X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Canada's major container ports have competed successfully against their U.S. counterparts for overseas container traffic. However, the ocean container shipping industry is undergoing changes that will impact on their relationships with ports and competition among ports for container traffic has been fierce. This paper explores how Canadian ports might fare in this increasingly competitive environment, based on their natural and man-made attributes, their competitive stance and their potential to meet the evolving ocean container industry.

    The assessment includes a review of the ocean container shipping industry, the North American container market and competing ports in the United States (U.S.). This report uses data from two sources, Statistics Canada's marine international origin/destination (O/D) database and the U.S. Department of Transport Maritime Administration's (MARAD) Annual Import Export Waterborne Databank which is based on Journal of Commerce P.I.E.R.S. data.

    The keys to the success of Canadian container ports have been a combination of natural endowments, investments in intermodal facilities and competitive pricing. These factors are likely to continue into the future, however, the competition among container ports is likely to intensify as industry consolidation continues and as publicly funded U.S. intermodal terminal and corridor projects come to fruition.

    Release date: 2003-06-09

  • Table: 35-006-X
    Description:

    This publication provides detailed information on office furniture products. It contains semi-annual and year-to-date data for the current and previous year on shipments of office furniture products and their destination. The data are also disaggregated by selected wooden and metal furniture products including such commodities as: upholstered chairs, swivel seats, complete systems, systems components and furniture panels, desks, vertical and lateral filing equipment and screens.

    Release date: 2003-05-06
Data (3)

Data (3) ((3 results))

  • Table: 35-006-X
    Description:

    This publication provides detailed information on office furniture products. It contains semi-annual and year-to-date data for the current and previous year on shipments of office furniture products and their destination. The data are also disaggregated by selected wooden and metal furniture products including such commodities as: upholstered chairs, swivel seats, complete systems, systems components and furniture panels, desks, vertical and lateral filing equipment and screens.

    Release date: 2003-05-06

  • Table: 55-001-X
    Description:

    This on-line publication covers the activities of the major pipelines carrying crude oil and equivalents, liquefied petroleum gases such as propane, butane, ethane and others within and between provinces. The data are collected by province for receipts, deliveries, imports, exports and inventories.

    Release date: 2002-07-24

  • Table: 51-204-X
    Description:

    This on-line publication presents statistics and analysis on the volume of domestic air passenger traffic generated at Canadian cities and carried between pairs of Canadian points. The data may be used to indicate the relative community of interest between Canadian cities.

    Release date: 2000-10-05
Analysis (24)

Analysis (24) (20 to 30 of 24 results)

  • Articles and reports: 87-003-X20010015462
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    To better understand the changes occuring in the US market, we will first compare the main characteristics of American travellers to Canada in 1990 and 1997. Then we will compare the characteristics of family travel and non-family travel seperately in 1990 and 1997.

    Release date: 2001-01-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2000152
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    There has been for some time substantial concern regarding the loss of young people in rural communities. There is a sense that most rural communities offer few opportunities for their younger people, requiring them to leave for urban communities, most likely not to return. While there is a considerable body of research on interprovincial migration, relatively little is currently known about migration patterns in rural and urban areas in Canada.

    According to our analysis, in virtually all provinces young people 15 to 19 years of age are leaving rural areas in greater proportions than urban areas - in part to pursue post-secondary education. While there are more complex migration patterns affecting the 20-29 age group, the net result of all migration is that the Atlantic provinces - as well as Manitoba and Saskatchewan - are net losers of their rural population aged 15-29. The problem is particularly acute in Newfoundland. In the Atlantic provinces, rural areas which fare worse than the national average - in terms of net gains of youth population - do so not because they have a higher than average percentage of leavers but rather because they are unable to attract a sufficiently high proportion of individuals into their communities.

    Of all individuals who move out of their rural community, at most 25% return to this community ten years later. The implication of this result is clear: one cannot count on return migration as a means of preserving the population size of a given cohort. Rather, rural areas must rely on inflows from other (urban) areas to achieve this goal. Some rural communities achieve this; that is, they register positive net in-migration of persons aged 25-29 or older, even though they incur a net loss of younger people.

    Individuals who move out of rural areas generally experience higher earnings growth than their counterparts who stay. However, it remains an open question in which direction the causality works: is the higher earnings growth the result of the migration process itself or does it reflect the possibility that people with higher earnings growth potential are more likely to become movers?

    Release date: 2000-09-05

  • Articles and reports: 87-403-X19970014749
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article provides a thumbnail sketch of the top ten tourism regions in Canada based on the number of overnight visits. It will point out some of the similarities these regions share, as well as what makes them unique.

    Release date: 1999-11-24

  • Articles and reports: 87-403-X19970014751
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The purpose of this chapter is, first, to review some of the current long and medium term forecasts for tourism globally and within Canada. Secondly, the chapter discusses some of the Canadian tourism industries' current responses to their changing economic and social context.

    Release date: 1999-11-24
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