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All (19) (0 to 10 of 19 results)

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X201900100001
    Description:

    This article examines the economic profile of Agaricus and specialty mushrooms producers in Canada, over the last decade. This analysis assesses the mushroom production and marketing sector using qualitative values, production volumes, farm gate sales values, prices and export data.

    Release date: 2019-05-23

  • Articles and reports: 96-325-X201400111921
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Horticulture is a type of agriculture that encompasses a wide range of crop production. Fruit, vegetable, ornamental and medicinal plant culture all fall under the umbrella of horticulture. There are two broad categories of crops within horticulture: edible and non-edible crops.

    Edible horticulture crops, such as fruits, vegetables and nuts, are products grown for human food that are either consumed fresh or processed into value-added products, such as frozen foods, preserves and wine. Although they are not biologically classified as plants, mushrooms are considered to be an edible product of horticulture. Medicinal plants which are grown for teas and supplements such as ginseng are also considered to be edible horticultural products.

    Non-edible horticulture crops are not used as food but are rather produced for other purposes. For instance, cut flowers, bedding plants, shrubs, trees, and perennials are grown as ornamental plants to enhance the appearance of homes, offices, gardens and public spaces. Sod farming is another type of non-edible horticulture which produces established turf for lawns, parks and sports fields.

    Release date: 2014-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X200900210942
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article highlights the key agricultural events in 2008.

    Release date: 2009-11-10

  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X200900310927
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Water is essential for crop production, whether it is provided by rain or irrigation. Although relatively few farms in Canada irrigate, this use of water can represent a significant portion of water use in some areas of the country. This article presents information on the use of irrigation in 2007.

    Release date: 2009-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 96-325-X200700010775
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    What could be better than a home-made cherry pie coming fresh out of the oven, with the wonderful smell of rich cherries and bright red juice. Historically there have been two main types of cherries; sweet cherries which we eat fresh from the tree and farmers markets in the summer, and sour cherries, which we find in a variety of processed forms. Sour cherries are aptly named for their sour flavour compared to the regular sweet cherries. Canadian plant breeders have been working to produce a third type of cherry, one that combines the best traits of both sweet and sour cherries.

    Release date: 2009-04-03

  • Articles and reports: 96-325-X200700010778
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    With its vibrant yellow flowers, a canola field is a beautiful sight. And its colour is a clue to its family history mustard. Canola refers to a particular group of rapeseed varieties, a species of the much larger mustard family that includes, besides mustard, turnips, cauliflower, cabbage and broccoli. While these plants have been bred for their roots (turnips), leaves (cabbage) or immature flower heads (cauliflower and broccoli), the rapeseed branch of the family was bred to maximize production of the high-oil seeds that are used to produce vegetable oil.

    Release date: 2009-04-03

  • Articles and reports: 96-325-X200700010646
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Food is as much a necessity as the air we breathe and the water we drink. But do we know where our food comes from, and what it takes to get it into our kitchens? The question of where our food is grown or processed is coming under increased scrutiny, not just in Canada but in other countries, including our trading partners. Concerns underlying this increased focus include discussions of energy consumption required for food transport, environmental concerns, product safety, food security and food costs. The article, Fork in the Road, takes a look at the trade in food and shows how Canadians can find out what foods are being produced in their local area.

    Release date: 2008-07-25

  • Articles and reports: 96-325-X200700010576
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Description:

    Sugar beets, significantly established in Canada in the first half of the 20th century, continue to sweeten things for farmers in Ontario and Alberta, according to Census of Agriculture data. Although Canada's sugar beet area in 2006, at 19,488 hectares, is only half the 1951 peak, the crop continues to thrive in Alberta, and has made a comeback in Ontario, a province where it had not been significant for decades.

    Release date: 2008-05-23

  • Articles and reports: 21-601-M2007087
    Description:

    This paper describes the efforts and results of Statistics Canada to produce comparable agricultural water use estimates at the national, provincial and sub-sub-drainage area level for reference year 2001.

    Release date: 2007-11-13

  • Articles and reports: 96-325-X200700010369
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Until the mid-1970s, soybeans were restricted by climate primarily to southern Ontario. Intensive breeding programs have since opened up more widespread growing possibilities for this incredibly versatile crop in Canada: The 1.2 million hectares of soybeans reported on the Census of Agriculture in 2006 marked a near eightfold increase in area since 1976, the year the ground-breaking varieties that perform well in Canada's shorter growing season were introduced.

    Release date: 2007-10-26
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Analysis (19)

Analysis (19) (0 to 10 of 19 results)

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X201900100001
    Description:

    This article examines the economic profile of Agaricus and specialty mushrooms producers in Canada, over the last decade. This analysis assesses the mushroom production and marketing sector using qualitative values, production volumes, farm gate sales values, prices and export data.

    Release date: 2019-05-23

  • Articles and reports: 96-325-X201400111921
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Horticulture is a type of agriculture that encompasses a wide range of crop production. Fruit, vegetable, ornamental and medicinal plant culture all fall under the umbrella of horticulture. There are two broad categories of crops within horticulture: edible and non-edible crops.

    Edible horticulture crops, such as fruits, vegetables and nuts, are products grown for human food that are either consumed fresh or processed into value-added products, such as frozen foods, preserves and wine. Although they are not biologically classified as plants, mushrooms are considered to be an edible product of horticulture. Medicinal plants which are grown for teas and supplements such as ginseng are also considered to be edible horticultural products.

    Non-edible horticulture crops are not used as food but are rather produced for other purposes. For instance, cut flowers, bedding plants, shrubs, trees, and perennials are grown as ornamental plants to enhance the appearance of homes, offices, gardens and public spaces. Sod farming is another type of non-edible horticulture which produces established turf for lawns, parks and sports fields.

    Release date: 2014-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X200900210942
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article highlights the key agricultural events in 2008.

    Release date: 2009-11-10

  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X200900310927
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Water is essential for crop production, whether it is provided by rain or irrigation. Although relatively few farms in Canada irrigate, this use of water can represent a significant portion of water use in some areas of the country. This article presents information on the use of irrigation in 2007.

    Release date: 2009-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 96-325-X200700010775
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    What could be better than a home-made cherry pie coming fresh out of the oven, with the wonderful smell of rich cherries and bright red juice. Historically there have been two main types of cherries; sweet cherries which we eat fresh from the tree and farmers markets in the summer, and sour cherries, which we find in a variety of processed forms. Sour cherries are aptly named for their sour flavour compared to the regular sweet cherries. Canadian plant breeders have been working to produce a third type of cherry, one that combines the best traits of both sweet and sour cherries.

    Release date: 2009-04-03

  • Articles and reports: 96-325-X200700010778
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    With its vibrant yellow flowers, a canola field is a beautiful sight. And its colour is a clue to its family history mustard. Canola refers to a particular group of rapeseed varieties, a species of the much larger mustard family that includes, besides mustard, turnips, cauliflower, cabbage and broccoli. While these plants have been bred for their roots (turnips), leaves (cabbage) or immature flower heads (cauliflower and broccoli), the rapeseed branch of the family was bred to maximize production of the high-oil seeds that are used to produce vegetable oil.

    Release date: 2009-04-03

  • Articles and reports: 96-325-X200700010646
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Food is as much a necessity as the air we breathe and the water we drink. But do we know where our food comes from, and what it takes to get it into our kitchens? The question of where our food is grown or processed is coming under increased scrutiny, not just in Canada but in other countries, including our trading partners. Concerns underlying this increased focus include discussions of energy consumption required for food transport, environmental concerns, product safety, food security and food costs. The article, Fork in the Road, takes a look at the trade in food and shows how Canadians can find out what foods are being produced in their local area.

    Release date: 2008-07-25

  • Articles and reports: 96-325-X200700010576
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory
    Description:

    Sugar beets, significantly established in Canada in the first half of the 20th century, continue to sweeten things for farmers in Ontario and Alberta, according to Census of Agriculture data. Although Canada's sugar beet area in 2006, at 19,488 hectares, is only half the 1951 peak, the crop continues to thrive in Alberta, and has made a comeback in Ontario, a province where it had not been significant for decades.

    Release date: 2008-05-23

  • Articles and reports: 21-601-M2007087
    Description:

    This paper describes the efforts and results of Statistics Canada to produce comparable agricultural water use estimates at the national, provincial and sub-sub-drainage area level for reference year 2001.

    Release date: 2007-11-13

  • Articles and reports: 96-325-X200700010369
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Until the mid-1970s, soybeans were restricted by climate primarily to southern Ontario. Intensive breeding programs have since opened up more widespread growing possibilities for this incredibly versatile crop in Canada: The 1.2 million hectares of soybeans reported on the Census of Agriculture in 2006 marked a near eightfold increase in area since 1976, the year the ground-breaking varieties that perform well in Canada's shorter growing season were introduced.

    Release date: 2007-10-26
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