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All (10)

All (10) ((10 results))

  • Table: 10-10-0006-01
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Monthly
    Description:

    This table contains 102 series, with data starting from 2013, and some select series starting from 2016. This table contains data described by the following dimensions (Not all combinations are available): Geography (1 item: Canada), Components (51 items: Total, funds advanced, residential mortgages, insured; Variable rate, insured; Fixed rate, insured, less than 1 year; Fixed rate, insured, from 1 to less than 3 years; ...), and Unit of measure (2 items: Dollars; Interest rate). For additional clarification on the component dimension, please visit the OSFI website for the Report on New and Existing Lending.

    Release date: 2024-05-14

  • Table: 10-10-0006-02
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Monthly
    Description:

    This table contains 51 series, with data starting from 2013, and some select series starting from 2016. This table contains data described by the following dimensions (Not all combinations are available): Geography (1 item: Canada), Components (51 items: Total, funds advanced, residential mortgages, insured; Variable rate, insured; Fixed rate, insured, less than 1 year; Fixed rate, insured, from 1 to less than 3 years; ...), and Unit of measure (1 item: Dollars). For additional clarification on the component dimension, please visit the OSFI website for the Report on New and Existing Lending.

    Release date: 2024-05-14

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202300900001
    Description: Credit is a key element to modern economic life in Canada and immigrants may be at greater risk of lacking access to credit markets since credit information is, for the most part, not shared across international borders. Using data from the Survey of Financial Security, this paper studies the extent to which immigrants to Canada have access to credit and whether they are credit invisible. A person is credit invisible if they do not have a sufficient credit history for a credit reporting agency to be able to calculate a credit score or sufficient information to calculate the most accurate credit scores.
    Release date: 2023-09-27

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202300700002
    Description: According to the 2018 General Social Survey (GSS) data on caregiving in Canada, one in four Canadians aged 15 and older have provided some form of care for people with a long-term health condition, a disability or problems related to aging. The main objective of this study is to use nationwide administrative data to spotlight Canadian families caring for family members (including extended family members) who have severe and prolonged impairments in physical or mental functions. More specifically, this study documents the prevalence of families claiming the Canada caregiver credit (CCC) among all tax-filing families and breaks down the results by several essential family characteristics.
    Release date: 2023-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X202000100004
    Description:

    In the past, the Bank of Canada (the Bank) and Statistics Canada both produced aggregate measures of borrowing, or credit, for sectors of the Canadian economy. The Statistics Canada measures were on a quarterly basis as part of the National Balance Sheet Accounts (NBSA) whereas the Bank of Canada published monthly statistics. While both estimates are drawn from the same data sources and paint a similar picture of the indebtedness of Canadian households and non-financial businesses, some reconcilable differences existed in the aggregate measures. Starting in December 2020 Statistics Canada will be producing monthly estimates that will be integrated into the larger NBSA framework. This will provide users with a single and consistent set of monthly estimates that align with the internationally recognized national accounting principles detailed in the United Nations System of National Accounts This guide will serve as a review of the historical differences between each organization's credit aggregates, the conceptual and statistical changes that will occur as a result of the integration of monthly estimates within the NBSA, and a detailed overview of the methods that will be employed to estimate the outstanding credit debt of households and non-financial private corporations by lending sector.

    Release date: 2020-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201800154971
    Description:

    The Bank of Canada (the Bank) and Statistics Canada both produce aggregate measures of borrowing, or credit, for sectors of the Canadian economy. The Statistics Canada measures are part of the National Balance Sheet Accounts (NBSA), which cover the entire economy and directly align with the internationally recognized national accounting principles detailed in the United Nations System of National Accounts. The Bank’s data are presented based on the issuer of credit, i.e., the holder of the financial assets, and do not display liabilities. Both measures are constructed primarily from records of Canadian financial institutions and provide thorough coverage of lending by those institutions. They show a similar picture of the indebtedness of Canadian non-financial businesses, currently and in the past. However, the use of differing classification systems, methodologies and definitions result in some reconcilable differences in the aggregate measures. Therefore, the Bank and Statistics Canada conducted a joint study to understand and identify key differences between their respective measures of business credit loans, including non-mortgage business loans, non-residential mortgages and commercial paper.

    Release date: 2018-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201800154949
    Description:

    The Bank of Canada and Statistics Canada both produce aggregate measures of borrowing, or credit, for sectors of the Canadian economy. The Statistics Canada measures are part of the National Balance Sheet Accounts (NBSA), which cover the entire economy and directly align with the internationally recognized national accounting principles detailed in the United Nations System of National Accounts. They are available by sector as currently defined in the Canadian System of Macroeconomic Accounts. The NBSA are created using a balance sheet approach, which involves presenting the assets and liabilities for all instruments and sectors of the economy. In other words, for each instrument all holders of financial assets must have corresponding counterparties who hold the financial liabilities, and as such, the sum of these are equal in the aggregate. The Bank of Canada’s data are presented based on the issuer of credit, i.e., the holder of the financial assets, and do not display liabilities.

    Release date: 2018-03-15

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201500614219
    Description:

    This article describes new quarterly estimates of household sector debt payments (mortgage and non-mortgage), including both interest and principal components, from 1990 to the present.

    Release date: 2015-09-01

  • 9. Payday loans Archived
    Articles and reports: 75-001-X200710413185
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Payday loans are part of the growing alternative consumer credit market in Canada. These loans are for relatively small amounts ($100 to $1,000) and are short-term, with repayment usually made on or before the next payday. Although the convenience of payday loans makes them attractive, concerns have been raised about questionable practices within the industry, including high borrowing costs, insufficient disclosure of contract terms, and unfair collection practices. Who uses payday loans and why?

    Release date: 2007-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2005036
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Burkart and Ellingsen (2004) develop a model of trade credit and bank credit rationing which predicts that trade credit will be used by medium-wealth and low-wealth firms to help ease bank credit rationing. This paper tests this and other predictions of the Burkart and Ellingsen model using a large sample of more than 28,000 Canadian firms. The author uses an endogenous method to divide the firms into the appropriate wealth categories rather than arbitrarily selecting firms likely to be credit-rationed. The data support the main predictions of the model quite well. The author finds that medium-wealth firms substitute trade credit for bank credit consistent with using it to alleviate bank credit rationing. The low-wealth firms use trade credit but it is positively linked to bank credit, suggesting those firms are constrained in both bank credit and trade credit markets, and so cannot use trade credit to adjust as much to negative shocks. The findings also suggest that there are very few unconstrained, high-wealth Canadian firms. The author also finds low-wealth, declining and distressed firms supply proportionally more trade credit than firms with healthier balance sheets.

    Release date: 2005-11-04
Data (2)

Data (2) ((2 results))

  • Table: 10-10-0006-01
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Monthly
    Description:

    This table contains 102 series, with data starting from 2013, and some select series starting from 2016. This table contains data described by the following dimensions (Not all combinations are available): Geography (1 item: Canada), Components (51 items: Total, funds advanced, residential mortgages, insured; Variable rate, insured; Fixed rate, insured, less than 1 year; Fixed rate, insured, from 1 to less than 3 years; ...), and Unit of measure (2 items: Dollars; Interest rate). For additional clarification on the component dimension, please visit the OSFI website for the Report on New and Existing Lending.

    Release date: 2024-05-14

  • Table: 10-10-0006-02
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Monthly
    Description:

    This table contains 51 series, with data starting from 2013, and some select series starting from 2016. This table contains data described by the following dimensions (Not all combinations are available): Geography (1 item: Canada), Components (51 items: Total, funds advanced, residential mortgages, insured; Variable rate, insured; Fixed rate, insured, less than 1 year; Fixed rate, insured, from 1 to less than 3 years; ...), and Unit of measure (1 item: Dollars). For additional clarification on the component dimension, please visit the OSFI website for the Report on New and Existing Lending.

    Release date: 2024-05-14
Analysis (8)

Analysis (8) ((8 results))

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202300900001
    Description: Credit is a key element to modern economic life in Canada and immigrants may be at greater risk of lacking access to credit markets since credit information is, for the most part, not shared across international borders. Using data from the Survey of Financial Security, this paper studies the extent to which immigrants to Canada have access to credit and whether they are credit invisible. A person is credit invisible if they do not have a sufficient credit history for a credit reporting agency to be able to calculate a credit score or sufficient information to calculate the most accurate credit scores.
    Release date: 2023-09-27

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202300700002
    Description: According to the 2018 General Social Survey (GSS) data on caregiving in Canada, one in four Canadians aged 15 and older have provided some form of care for people with a long-term health condition, a disability or problems related to aging. The main objective of this study is to use nationwide administrative data to spotlight Canadian families caring for family members (including extended family members) who have severe and prolonged impairments in physical or mental functions. More specifically, this study documents the prevalence of families claiming the Canada caregiver credit (CCC) among all tax-filing families and breaks down the results by several essential family characteristics.
    Release date: 2023-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X202000100004
    Description:

    In the past, the Bank of Canada (the Bank) and Statistics Canada both produced aggregate measures of borrowing, or credit, for sectors of the Canadian economy. The Statistics Canada measures were on a quarterly basis as part of the National Balance Sheet Accounts (NBSA) whereas the Bank of Canada published monthly statistics. While both estimates are drawn from the same data sources and paint a similar picture of the indebtedness of Canadian households and non-financial businesses, some reconcilable differences existed in the aggregate measures. Starting in December 2020 Statistics Canada will be producing monthly estimates that will be integrated into the larger NBSA framework. This will provide users with a single and consistent set of monthly estimates that align with the internationally recognized national accounting principles detailed in the United Nations System of National Accounts This guide will serve as a review of the historical differences between each organization's credit aggregates, the conceptual and statistical changes that will occur as a result of the integration of monthly estimates within the NBSA, and a detailed overview of the methods that will be employed to estimate the outstanding credit debt of households and non-financial private corporations by lending sector.

    Release date: 2020-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201800154971
    Description:

    The Bank of Canada (the Bank) and Statistics Canada both produce aggregate measures of borrowing, or credit, for sectors of the Canadian economy. The Statistics Canada measures are part of the National Balance Sheet Accounts (NBSA), which cover the entire economy and directly align with the internationally recognized national accounting principles detailed in the United Nations System of National Accounts. The Bank’s data are presented based on the issuer of credit, i.e., the holder of the financial assets, and do not display liabilities. Both measures are constructed primarily from records of Canadian financial institutions and provide thorough coverage of lending by those institutions. They show a similar picture of the indebtedness of Canadian non-financial businesses, currently and in the past. However, the use of differing classification systems, methodologies and definitions result in some reconcilable differences in the aggregate measures. Therefore, the Bank and Statistics Canada conducted a joint study to understand and identify key differences between their respective measures of business credit loans, including non-mortgage business loans, non-residential mortgages and commercial paper.

    Release date: 2018-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201800154949
    Description:

    The Bank of Canada and Statistics Canada both produce aggregate measures of borrowing, or credit, for sectors of the Canadian economy. The Statistics Canada measures are part of the National Balance Sheet Accounts (NBSA), which cover the entire economy and directly align with the internationally recognized national accounting principles detailed in the United Nations System of National Accounts. They are available by sector as currently defined in the Canadian System of Macroeconomic Accounts. The NBSA are created using a balance sheet approach, which involves presenting the assets and liabilities for all instruments and sectors of the economy. In other words, for each instrument all holders of financial assets must have corresponding counterparties who hold the financial liabilities, and as such, the sum of these are equal in the aggregate. The Bank of Canada’s data are presented based on the issuer of credit, i.e., the holder of the financial assets, and do not display liabilities.

    Release date: 2018-03-15

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201500614219
    Description:

    This article describes new quarterly estimates of household sector debt payments (mortgage and non-mortgage), including both interest and principal components, from 1990 to the present.

    Release date: 2015-09-01

  • 7. Payday loans Archived
    Articles and reports: 75-001-X200710413185
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Payday loans are part of the growing alternative consumer credit market in Canada. These loans are for relatively small amounts ($100 to $1,000) and are short-term, with repayment usually made on or before the next payday. Although the convenience of payday loans makes them attractive, concerns have been raised about questionable practices within the industry, including high borrowing costs, insufficient disclosure of contract terms, and unfair collection practices. Who uses payday loans and why?

    Release date: 2007-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2005036
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Burkart and Ellingsen (2004) develop a model of trade credit and bank credit rationing which predicts that trade credit will be used by medium-wealth and low-wealth firms to help ease bank credit rationing. This paper tests this and other predictions of the Burkart and Ellingsen model using a large sample of more than 28,000 Canadian firms. The author uses an endogenous method to divide the firms into the appropriate wealth categories rather than arbitrarily selecting firms likely to be credit-rationed. The data support the main predictions of the model quite well. The author finds that medium-wealth firms substitute trade credit for bank credit consistent with using it to alleviate bank credit rationing. The low-wealth firms use trade credit but it is positively linked to bank credit, suggesting those firms are constrained in both bank credit and trade credit markets, and so cannot use trade credit to adjust as much to negative shocks. The findings also suggest that there are very few unconstrained, high-wealth Canadian firms. The author also finds low-wealth, declining and distressed firms supply proportionally more trade credit than firms with healthier balance sheets.

    Release date: 2005-11-04
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