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All (29) (0 to 10 of 29 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2015046
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article provides an overview of the life satisfaction expressed by individuals in census metropolitan areas and economic regions across Canada. The results are based on data from the Canadian Community Health Survey and the General Social Survey. The extent to which specific economic and social factors explain variations in life satisfaction across communities and regions is beyond the scope of this article.

    Release date: 2015-04-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2014042
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series presents estimates of census metropolitan area gross domestic product (GDP) from 2001 to 2009. It examines the level of metropolitan area GDP, the contribution of metropolitan areas to national GDP, and how GDP per capita varies across metropolitan areas.

    Release date: 2014-11-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2012027
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A growing literature has found a positive association between human capital and long-run employment growth across cities. These studies have increased interest in understanding the location choices of university degree-holders, a group often used as a proxy measure of human capital. Based on data from the 2001 Canadian Census of Population, this paper investigates determinants of the location choices of degree- and non-degree-holders. With a multinomial logit model, it tests a series of hypotheses about the differential effects of thick labor markets and amenities on the location choice of these groups across metropolitan and non-metropolitan areas in Canada.

    Release date: 2012-08-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2012023
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the process by which migrants experience gains in earnings subsequent to migration and, in particular, the advantage that migrants obtain from moving to large, dynamic metropolitan labour markets, using Toronto as a benchmark. There are two potentially distinct patterns to gains in earnings associated with migration. The first is a step upwards in which workers realize immediate gains in earnings subsequent to migration. The second is accelerated gains in earnings subsequent to migration. Immediate gains are associated with obtaining a position in a more productive firm and/or a better match between worker skills and abilities and job tasks. Accelerated gains in earnings are associated processes that take time, such as learning or job switching as workers and firms seek out better matches. Evaluated here is the expectation that the economies of large metropolitan areas provide workers with an initial productive advantage stemming from a one-time improvement in worker productivity and/or a dynamic that accelerates gains in earnings over time through the potentially entwined processes of learning and matching. A variety of datasets and methodologies, including propensity score matching, are used to evaluate patterns of income gains associated with migration to Toronto.

    Release date: 2012-05-03

  • Geographic files and documentation: 16-001-M2010011
    Description:

    This technical paper outlines the methodology used to delineate boundaries for Canada's settlements.

    Release date: 2010-02-02

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2010020
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using 2001 Census data, this paper investigates the extent to which the urban-rural gap in the earnings of employed workers is associated with human capital composition and agglomeration economies. Both factors have been theoretically and empirically linked to urban-rural earnings differences. Agglomeration economies-the productivity enhancing effects of the geographic concentration of workers and firms-may underlie these differences as they may be stronger in larger urban centres. But human capital composition may also drive the urban-rural earnings gap if workers with higher levels of education and/or experience are more prevalent in cities. The analysis finds that up to one-half of urban-rural earnings differences are related to human capital composition. It also demonstrates that agglomeration economies related to city size are associated with earnings levels, but their influence is significantly reduced by the inclusion of controls for human capital.

    Release date: 2010-01-25

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2008012
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This research paper focuses on the spatial analysis of crime and neighbourhood characteristics in Saskatoon. Analysis is based on police-reported crime data from the 2001 Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey and the 2001 Census of Population.

    Release date: 2008-07-03

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2008011
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This research paper explores the spatial distribution of youth crime and various social, economic and physical neighbourhood characteristics on the Island of Montréal. Analysis is based on police-reported crime data from the 2001 Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey, the 2001 Census of Population, and the Communauté métropolitaine de Montréal land-use data.

    Release date: 2008-06-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800110574
    Geography: Geographical region of Canada
    Description:

    In order to celebrate Québec City's 400th birthday, this article is about the city's evolution, but also about the circumstances revolving around the censuses from the early beginnings up until now. The article looks at the census' history and at the data that emerged from it over the past four centuries.

    Release date: 2008-06-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2008019
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    University degree holders in large cities are more prevalent and are growing at a more rapid pace than in smaller cities and rural areas. This relatively high rate of growth stems from net migratory flows and/or higher rates of degree attainment in cities. Using data from the 1996 and 2001 Censuses, this paper tests the relative importance of these two sources of human capital growth by decomposing degree-holder growth across cities into net migratory flows (domestic and foreign) and in situ growth: that is, growth resulting from higher rates of degree attainment among the resident populations of cities. We find that both sources are important, with in situ growth being the more dominant force. Hence, it is less the ability of cities to attract human capital than their ability to generate it that underlies the high rates of degree attainment we observe across city populations.

    Release date: 2008-06-02
Data (5)

Data (5) ((5 results))

  • Table: 62-554-X
    Description:

    The Family food expenditure in Canada publication provides detailed and summary information on food expenditure by household. Food items purchased from stores and meals bought from restaurants are presented separately. Summary food items purchased from stores include: fresh and frozen meat and poultry; fish; dairy products - milk, cheese; eggs; bakery and cereal products - bread, cookies, cakes; pasta products; breakfast cereal; fresh fruit; other prepared fruit; fresh vegetables; other prepared vegetables; condiments; sugar; coffee and tea; fats and oils; other prepared foods - soups, potato chips; and non-alcoholic beverages. Also, total food purchased from stores is shown by type of store - supermarkets, food specialty stores, convenience stores and other stores. Meals purchased from restaurants are presented as follows: breakfasts, lunches, dinners and between-meals food. Food expenditures are profiled by size and type of household and other household characteristics. Discussions of food purchasing patterns over the years, who goes grocery shopping, who eats out and who buys diary products are included. Information about household income is presented by income group and income quintile.

    Summary and detailed information for the provinces (excluding the North West Territories and the Yukon Territory), selected metropolitan areas (including Whitehorse and Yellowknife) and size of area of residence is presented. Detailed expenditure information and cross-classified tables for all levels of geography are available upon request.

    Release date: 2003-02-21

  • Table: 51-204-X19980005213
    Description:

    Text Table 2.1 shows the change in the relationship between passenger counts and population for the ten most-frequented Canadian cities over the years 1973, 1993 and 1998.

    Release date: 2000-10-05

  • Table: 51-204-X19980005215
    Description:

    In this paper, the proportion of passengers flying within Canada that reach their destination on a direct flight is measured in order to assess the service that is offered by the carriers.

    Release date: 2000-10-05

  • Table: 62-010-X
    Description:

    The publication highlights current and historical statistics on consumer prices and related price indexes. A comparative index contains retail price differentials for 11 major cities by selected groups of consumer goods and services.

    Release date: 1999-08-03

  • Table: 51-204-X19970004473
    Description:

    An estimated 12.3 million passengers travelled on scheduled flights in Canada in 1997. Overall travel within Canada on scheduled and chartered flights combined, totalled 14.2 million in 1997.

    Release date: 1999-04-13
Analysis (23)

Analysis (23) (0 to 10 of 23 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2015046
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article provides an overview of the life satisfaction expressed by individuals in census metropolitan areas and economic regions across Canada. The results are based on data from the Canadian Community Health Survey and the General Social Survey. The extent to which specific economic and social factors explain variations in life satisfaction across communities and regions is beyond the scope of this article.

    Release date: 2015-04-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2014042
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series presents estimates of census metropolitan area gross domestic product (GDP) from 2001 to 2009. It examines the level of metropolitan area GDP, the contribution of metropolitan areas to national GDP, and how GDP per capita varies across metropolitan areas.

    Release date: 2014-11-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2012027
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A growing literature has found a positive association between human capital and long-run employment growth across cities. These studies have increased interest in understanding the location choices of university degree-holders, a group often used as a proxy measure of human capital. Based on data from the 2001 Canadian Census of Population, this paper investigates determinants of the location choices of degree- and non-degree-holders. With a multinomial logit model, it tests a series of hypotheses about the differential effects of thick labor markets and amenities on the location choice of these groups across metropolitan and non-metropolitan areas in Canada.

    Release date: 2012-08-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2012023
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the process by which migrants experience gains in earnings subsequent to migration and, in particular, the advantage that migrants obtain from moving to large, dynamic metropolitan labour markets, using Toronto as a benchmark. There are two potentially distinct patterns to gains in earnings associated with migration. The first is a step upwards in which workers realize immediate gains in earnings subsequent to migration. The second is accelerated gains in earnings subsequent to migration. Immediate gains are associated with obtaining a position in a more productive firm and/or a better match between worker skills and abilities and job tasks. Accelerated gains in earnings are associated processes that take time, such as learning or job switching as workers and firms seek out better matches. Evaluated here is the expectation that the economies of large metropolitan areas provide workers with an initial productive advantage stemming from a one-time improvement in worker productivity and/or a dynamic that accelerates gains in earnings over time through the potentially entwined processes of learning and matching. A variety of datasets and methodologies, including propensity score matching, are used to evaluate patterns of income gains associated with migration to Toronto.

    Release date: 2012-05-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2010020
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using 2001 Census data, this paper investigates the extent to which the urban-rural gap in the earnings of employed workers is associated with human capital composition and agglomeration economies. Both factors have been theoretically and empirically linked to urban-rural earnings differences. Agglomeration economies-the productivity enhancing effects of the geographic concentration of workers and firms-may underlie these differences as they may be stronger in larger urban centres. But human capital composition may also drive the urban-rural earnings gap if workers with higher levels of education and/or experience are more prevalent in cities. The analysis finds that up to one-half of urban-rural earnings differences are related to human capital composition. It also demonstrates that agglomeration economies related to city size are associated with earnings levels, but their influence is significantly reduced by the inclusion of controls for human capital.

    Release date: 2010-01-25

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2008012
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This research paper focuses on the spatial analysis of crime and neighbourhood characteristics in Saskatoon. Analysis is based on police-reported crime data from the 2001 Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey and the 2001 Census of Population.

    Release date: 2008-07-03

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2008011
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This research paper explores the spatial distribution of youth crime and various social, economic and physical neighbourhood characteristics on the Island of Montréal. Analysis is based on police-reported crime data from the 2001 Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey, the 2001 Census of Population, and the Communauté métropolitaine de Montréal land-use data.

    Release date: 2008-06-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800110574
    Geography: Geographical region of Canada
    Description:

    In order to celebrate Québec City's 400th birthday, this article is about the city's evolution, but also about the circumstances revolving around the censuses from the early beginnings up until now. The article looks at the census' history and at the data that emerged from it over the past four centuries.

    Release date: 2008-06-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2008019
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    University degree holders in large cities are more prevalent and are growing at a more rapid pace than in smaller cities and rural areas. This relatively high rate of growth stems from net migratory flows and/or higher rates of degree attainment in cities. Using data from the 1996 and 2001 Censuses, this paper tests the relative importance of these two sources of human capital growth by decomposing degree-holder growth across cities into net migratory flows (domestic and foreign) and in situ growth: that is, growth resulting from higher rates of degree attainment among the resident populations of cities. We find that both sources are important, with in situ growth being the more dominant force. Hence, it is less the ability of cities to attract human capital than their ability to generate it that underlies the high rates of degree attainment we observe across city populations.

    Release date: 2008-06-02

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2008018
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the presence of knowledge spillovers that affect the adoption of advanced technologies in the Canadian manufacturing sector. It examines whether plants that adopt advanced technologies are more likely to do so when there are other nearby plants that do so within a model of technology adoption.

    Release date: 2008-02-05
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

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