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  • Public use microdata: 81M0011X
    Description:

    This survey was designed to determine such factors as: the extent to which graduates of postsecondary programs had been successful in obtaining employment since graduation; the relationship between the graduates' programs of study and the employment subsequently obtained; the graduates' job and career satisfaction; the rates of under-employment and unemployment; the type of employment obtained related to career expectations and qualification requirements; and the influence of postsecondary education on occupational achievement. The information is directed towards policy makers, researchers, educators, employers and young adults-interested in postsecondary education and the transition from school to work of trade/vocational, college and university graduates.

    Release date: 2015-01-12

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008069
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    "Doctorate Education in Canada: Findings from the Survey of Earned Doctorates, 2005/2006" is the third paper in a series of reports written by the Learning Policy Directorate of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC) and the Centre for Education Statistics of Statistics Canada. Each report presents an overview of doctoral education covering annual data from the Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED) from each of the three years of the survey's existence (2003/2004, 2004/2005 and 2005/2006).

    The Survey of Earned Doctorates is a key source of information regarding the training of doctoral graduates in Canada. It provides information on the pathways of these highly qualified graduates through the education system and sheds light into the expectations of graduates as they transition into employment and postdoctoral education.

    In this 2005/2006 report, special attention has been given to the foreign born among the doctoral graduates. Foreign-born graduates represent more than one in every five graduates in the 2005/2006 academic year, and over half of all doctoral graduates living in Canada in 2006. Canada's immigration policy, with its emphasis on educational attainment, ensures that the foreign born will continue to account for a large proportion of Canada's doctorate degree holders. Furthermore, attracting foreign-born talent to Canada will be important if Canada is to increase the number of doctoral degree holders, since growth in the graduates from Canadian institutions has been minimal. One of the key challenges will be to retain graduates, both foreign-born and Canadian-born, in Canada upon the completion of their degree.

    Also unique to this third report, is the ability to discuss trends over the three years of survey data.

    Release date: 2008-10-17

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008065
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report presents findings from the 2004/2005 Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED). The survey was administered to all students graduating from a doctoral program at a Canadian University. The 2004/2005 SED is the second edition of the annual survey.

    In the 2004/2005 academic year there were approximately 4,000 new doctoral graduates, adding to the stock of highly specialized human capital in Canada. Over three quarters of Canada's PhD graduates are completing their studies in a science or engineering field, with the most popular field of study being biological sciences. Although PhD graduates accounted for roughly 0.4% of the population, Canada lags behind many other OECD countries in this regard.

    Most graduates were finding success upon completion of their degrees as a large majority of graduates (73%) had firm plans to be working or continuing their studies by the time of graduation. The proportion of students who graduated without any graduate student debt decreased from the year before to reach 59%. Over three quarters of the graduates plan to stay in Canada to either work or continue their education.

    Release date: 2008-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005263
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Previous studies investigating the role of rising tuition fees in university enrolment by socio-economic background have focused on the fee changes registered among undergraduate programs over the 1990s. Over this period, no changes in enrolment patterns were observed, possibly because the tuition fee increases were small in absolute terms and gradual. This study examines the impact of a very large and sudden deregulation of tuition fees in Ontario professional programs in the late 1990s. The findings suggest that the enrolment gap between students from higher and lower socio-economic backgrounds rose substantially in Ontario, where the deregulation of professional programs was more prominent. In provinces like Quebec and British Columbia, where tuition fees remained stable, no change in the enrolment gap was registered.

    Release date: 2005-09-27

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 96-328-M2004026
    Description:

    The issue of biotechnology in agriculture has generated much debate. This activity is designed to help students better understand biological systems for producing materials and their advantages over synthetic systems.

    Release date: 2005-01-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2004233
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In Canada's federal system for economic (skilled) class immigrant selection, education is treated as if it is homogeneous and only differs in quantity. Some provinces, however, differentiate based on postsecondary field of study. This study explores the economic implications of field of study for each sex, and for two subgroups of immigrants, those educated in Canada and those educated elsewhere .

    Field of study is not observed to explain much of the earnings difference between immigrants and the Canadian born, though it is relatively more important for males than females in doing so. Interestingly, while there are a few exceptions, a general pattern is observed whereby the differences between high- and low-earning fields are not as large for immigrants as for the Canadian born. Similarly, social assistance receipt has smaller variance across fields for immigrants than for the Canadian born. Nevertheless, substantial inter-field differences are observed for each immigrant group.

    Release date: 2004-10-28

  • Table: 95F0424X2001002
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: census metropolitan areas, tracted census agglomerations and census tracts.

    This table is part of the topic "Education in Canada: Major Fields of Study," which presents 2001 Census data on the predominant discipline or area of learning or training of a person's highest postsecondary degree, certificate or diploma. These data can be used to help understand the make-up of the labour force, for example, whether Canada has an abundance or a lack of skilled human resources in a particular area.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    Release date: 2003-03-11

  • Table: 95F0424X2001003
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories and federal electoral districts (1996 Representation order).

    This table is part of the topic "Education in Canada: Major Fields of Study," which presents 2001 Census data on the predominant discipline or area of learning or training of a person's highest postsecondary degree, certificate or diploma. These data can be used to help understand the make-up of the labour force, for example, whether Canada has an abundance or a lack of skilled human resources in a particular area.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    Release date: 2003-03-11

  • Table: 95F0424X2001004
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories, census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations.

    This table is part of the topic "Education in Canada: Major Fields of Study," which presents 2001 Census data on the predominant discipline or area of learning or training of a person's highest postsecondary degree, certificate or diploma. These data can be used to help understand the make-up of the labour force, for example, whether Canada has an abundance or a lack of skilled human resources in a particular area.

    This table can also be found in the Topic Bundle: Education in Canada: Major Fields of Study, 2001 Census, Catalogue No. 97F0018XCB2001000.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, refer to Catalogue no. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 95F0424XIE2001004.

    Release date: 2003-03-11

  • Table: 95F0424X2001006
    Description:

    This table shows 2001 Census data for the following levels of geography: Canada, provinces, territories, census divisions and census subdivisions.

    This table is part of the topic "Education in Canada: Major Fields of Study," which presents 2001 Census data on the predominant discipline or area of learning or training of a person's highest postsecondary degree, certificate or diploma. These data can be used to help understand the make-up of the labour force, for example, whether Canada has an abundance or a lack of skilled human resources in a particular area.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    Release date: 2003-03-11
Data (12)

Data (12) (0 to 10 of 12 results)

Analysis (23)

Analysis (23) (0 to 10 of 23 results)

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008069
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    "Doctorate Education in Canada: Findings from the Survey of Earned Doctorates, 2005/2006" is the third paper in a series of reports written by the Learning Policy Directorate of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC) and the Centre for Education Statistics of Statistics Canada. Each report presents an overview of doctoral education covering annual data from the Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED) from each of the three years of the survey's existence (2003/2004, 2004/2005 and 2005/2006).

    The Survey of Earned Doctorates is a key source of information regarding the training of doctoral graduates in Canada. It provides information on the pathways of these highly qualified graduates through the education system and sheds light into the expectations of graduates as they transition into employment and postdoctoral education.

    In this 2005/2006 report, special attention has been given to the foreign born among the doctoral graduates. Foreign-born graduates represent more than one in every five graduates in the 2005/2006 academic year, and over half of all doctoral graduates living in Canada in 2006. Canada's immigration policy, with its emphasis on educational attainment, ensures that the foreign born will continue to account for a large proportion of Canada's doctorate degree holders. Furthermore, attracting foreign-born talent to Canada will be important if Canada is to increase the number of doctoral degree holders, since growth in the graduates from Canadian institutions has been minimal. One of the key challenges will be to retain graduates, both foreign-born and Canadian-born, in Canada upon the completion of their degree.

    Also unique to this third report, is the ability to discuss trends over the three years of survey data.

    Release date: 2008-10-17

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008065
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report presents findings from the 2004/2005 Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED). The survey was administered to all students graduating from a doctoral program at a Canadian University. The 2004/2005 SED is the second edition of the annual survey.

    In the 2004/2005 academic year there were approximately 4,000 new doctoral graduates, adding to the stock of highly specialized human capital in Canada. Over three quarters of Canada's PhD graduates are completing their studies in a science or engineering field, with the most popular field of study being biological sciences. Although PhD graduates accounted for roughly 0.4% of the population, Canada lags behind many other OECD countries in this regard.

    Most graduates were finding success upon completion of their degrees as a large majority of graduates (73%) had firm plans to be working or continuing their studies by the time of graduation. The proportion of students who graduated without any graduate student debt decreased from the year before to reach 59%. Over three quarters of the graduates plan to stay in Canada to either work or continue their education.

    Release date: 2008-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005263
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Previous studies investigating the role of rising tuition fees in university enrolment by socio-economic background have focused on the fee changes registered among undergraduate programs over the 1990s. Over this period, no changes in enrolment patterns were observed, possibly because the tuition fee increases were small in absolute terms and gradual. This study examines the impact of a very large and sudden deregulation of tuition fees in Ontario professional programs in the late 1990s. The findings suggest that the enrolment gap between students from higher and lower socio-economic backgrounds rose substantially in Ontario, where the deregulation of professional programs was more prominent. In provinces like Quebec and British Columbia, where tuition fees remained stable, no change in the enrolment gap was registered.

    Release date: 2005-09-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2004233
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In Canada's federal system for economic (skilled) class immigrant selection, education is treated as if it is homogeneous and only differs in quantity. Some provinces, however, differentiate based on postsecondary field of study. This study explores the economic implications of field of study for each sex, and for two subgroups of immigrants, those educated in Canada and those educated elsewhere .

    Field of study is not observed to explain much of the earnings difference between immigrants and the Canadian born, though it is relatively more important for males than females in doing so. Interestingly, while there are a few exceptions, a general pattern is observed whereby the differences between high- and low-earning fields are not as large for immigrants as for the Canadian born. Similarly, social assistance receipt has smaller variance across fields for immigrants than for the Canadian born. Nevertheless, substantial inter-field differences are observed for each immigrant group.

    Release date: 2004-10-28

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2003003
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report provides a description of the labour-market outcomes experienced by 1995 postsecondary graduates, by gender and by field of specialization.

    Release date: 2003-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002164
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper reports the results of an empirical analysis of the early career outcomes of recent Canadian Bachelor's level graduates by discipline based on three waves of the National Graduates Surveys, which comprise large, representative databases of individuals who successfully completed their programmes at Canadian universities in 1982, 1986, and 1990, with information gathered during interviews conducted two and five years after graduation for each group of graduates (1984/87, 1988/92, 1990/95).

    The outcomes analysed, all broken down by sex and discipline, include: the distribution of graduates by field and the percentage of female graduates; the percentage of graduates who subsequently completed another educational programme; the overall evaluation of the choice of major (would they choose it again?); unemployment rates, the percentage of workers in part-time jobs, in temporary jobs, self-employed; the job-education skill and credentials matches; earnings levels and rates of growth; and job satisfaction (earnings, overall).

    Many of the outcomes conform to expectations, typically reflecting the different orientations of the various disciplines with respect to direct career preparedness, with the professions and other applied disciplines generally characterised by lower unemployment rates, closer skill and qualification matches, higher earnings, and so on. On the other hand, while the "applied" fields also tend to perform well in terms of the "softer", more subjective measures regarding job satisfaction and the overall evaluation of the chosen programme (would the graduate choose the same major again?), the findings also indicate that graduates' assessments of their post-graduation experiences and overall evaluations of the programmes from which they graduated are based on more than simply adding up standard measures of labour market "success", with the job satisfaction scores and - perhaps most interestingly - the overall programme evaluations often departing from what the objective measures (unemployment rates, earnings levels, etc.) might have predicted. Some implications of the findings are discussed and avenues for future research are suggested.

    Release date: 2002-03-21

  • 7. Time to skill Archived
    Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020016150
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Given that science and technology skills are a high priority for maintaining Canada's competitive advantage in the new economy, the obvious question is: Where do S&T skills come from and how does Canada compare with other countries? Read the findings from a recent Statistics Canada study that examines the ins and outs of the science stream, starting in Grade 4 through to the workforce.

    Release date: 2002-02-15

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20000025526
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article studies the links among academic achievement, children's views of themselves, and adults' support during the transition to early adolescence. It uses the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY).

    Release date: 2001-03-01

  • 9. Stateward bound Archived
    Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990044912
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article describes a group of Canadian postsecondary graduates who relocated to the United States.

    Release date: 2000-03-16

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X1999009
    Description:

    This working paper presents the estimation procedures used to calculate the research and development (R&D) expenditures in the higher education sector for the year 1979-80 to 1997-98.

    Release date: 1999-12-24
Reference (2)

Reference (2) ((2 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 96-328-M2004026
    Description:

    The issue of biotechnology in agriculture has generated much debate. This activity is designed to help students better understand biological systems for producing materials and their advantages over synthetic systems.

    Release date: 2005-01-28

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M1995002
    Description:

    This paper presents the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) coding structure for the major fields of study for postsecondary graduates. It uses data collected in the 1991 Census of Population.

    Release date: 1995-12-30
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