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All (26)

All (26) (0 to 10 of 26 results)

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202300700003
    Description: Before the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, rapid advances in automation and artificial intelligence were often featured in discussions around the changing nature of work. The concern, which is still present today, centred around the possibility that machines and robots could perform certain tasks more efficiently than humans. The purpose of this study is to update the trends in the changing nature of work with new data covering the pandemic period (up to and including 2022).
    Release date: 2023-07-26

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2021055
    Description:

    A triple-protected job is one that has no predetermined end date, faces a low risk of automation, and is resilient to pandemics. This infographic presents characteristics of dual-earner couples that make them more or less likely to have both partners hold triple-protected jobs.

    Release date: 2021-06-23

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100100004
    Description:

    In recent years, technological advancements in artificial intelligence and machine learning have broadened the realm of tasks that have the potential to be accomplished through automation technology. Consequently, these developments have raised questions about the future of work. Debate on this issue has focused primarily on the risk of job loss attributable to automation, with less attention given to how automation may change the nature of workers’ jobs. This study employs a task-based approach that shifts the focus from job replacement to changes in the nature of Canadians’ work. This approach views occupations as a set of tasks, allowing researchers to assess the effects of automation in the context of changes in occupational tasks.

    Release date: 2021-01-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2020024
    Description:

    Recent improvements in robotics have rekindled ancient fears about the impact of robotics on humankind. Unfortunately, existing data seldom distinguishes robots from other types of automation, so research into their impact so far has been difficult. This article introduces research from a new Statistics Canada dataset, Robots!, on the impact of robots at the firm-level. The article examines the impact of robot investment on firm performance and employment at the enterprise level.

    Release date: 2020-11-02

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2020025
    Description:

    Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, advances in artificial intelligence and robotics raised concerns that automation might lead to relatively high unemployment rates in the coming years. This Economic Insights article examines the degree to which Canadians’ views about the impact of automation on net job creation in 1989 materialized three decades later.

    Release date: 2020-11-02

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020015
    Description:

    Recent advances in artificial intelligence and machine-learning technologies have fuelled fears of potential job losses among some workers. While the net impact of new technology on total jobs can be negative, positive or neutral, some workers may be more affected than others depending on how easily robots and algorithms can replace them, or how easily their skills complement the new technology. In the case of women and men, it is not clear who is likely to be most affected. This study estimates the risk of job transformation as a result of automation technology faced by women and men.

    Release date: 2020-09-24

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100033
    Description:

    Over the past few decades, computer technology has gradually changed workplaces, leading to a reduction of routine and manual job tasks, and an increase in non-routine, cognitive tasks. More recent developments in artificial intelligence and machine learning could be even more far-reaching, as they are designed to execute tasks that were traditionally considered non-automatable.

    Release date: 2020-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020011
    Description:

    The recent development of several artificial intelligence applications—such as driverless vehicles, robo-writers and computer-aided medical diagnostics—has led to concerns about the role of human workers in the future workforce. The COVID-19 pandemic has added to these concerns, as businesses may turn to new artificial intelligence technologies to perform work activities not traditionally regarded as automatable, such as social tasks. While previous studies have estimated the share of Canadian workers at high risk of automation-related job transformation, this study is the first to examine in great detail the automation risks faced by different groups of workers.

    Release date: 2020-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020003
    Description:

    From the early 2000s to the mid-2010s, the number of employees in manufacturing fell by roughly half a million in Canada. During that period, the percentage of Canadian men aged 21 to 55 employed mainly full time for at least 48 weeks in a given year fell by 5 percentage points, from 63.6% in 2000 to 58.6% in 2015. This study investigates whether the two trends are connected, i.e., whether the decline in manufacturing employment caused a decline in employment rates and wages among men.

    Release date: 2020-01-15

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201800154965
    Description:

    Information and communications technologies (ICT) play an important role in facilitating trade in services. The reduction in costs of ICT, technological advances and computerization of work have enabled services to increasingly be traded. Many services can now be instantaneously delivered online to businesses and consumers around the world.

    Release date: 2018-10-19
Data (2)

Data (2) ((2 results))

  • Thematic map: 95-634-X201700154903
    Description:

    This second set of thematic maps, based on the 2016 Census of Agriculture data, present the following theme: land use, land tenure and management practices. It includes maps about land use, land tenure, agricultural practices, land inputs, technologies used on the operation and renewable energy production on the operation.

    Release date: 2018-01-25

  • Public use microdata: 12M0014X
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This report presents a brief overview of the information collected in Cycle 14 of the General Social Survey (GSS). Cycle 14 is the first cycle to collect detailed information on access to and use of information communication technology in Canada. Topics include general use of technology and computers, technology in the workplace, development of computer skills, frequency of Internet and E-mail use, non-users and security and information on the Internet. The target population of the GSS is all individuals aged 15 and over living in a private household in one of the ten provinces.

    Release date: 2001-06-29
Analysis (22)

Analysis (22) (0 to 10 of 22 results)

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202300700003
    Description: Before the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, rapid advances in automation and artificial intelligence were often featured in discussions around the changing nature of work. The concern, which is still present today, centred around the possibility that machines and robots could perform certain tasks more efficiently than humans. The purpose of this study is to update the trends in the changing nature of work with new data covering the pandemic period (up to and including 2022).
    Release date: 2023-07-26

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2021055
    Description:

    A triple-protected job is one that has no predetermined end date, faces a low risk of automation, and is resilient to pandemics. This infographic presents characteristics of dual-earner couples that make them more or less likely to have both partners hold triple-protected jobs.

    Release date: 2021-06-23

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100100004
    Description:

    In recent years, technological advancements in artificial intelligence and machine learning have broadened the realm of tasks that have the potential to be accomplished through automation technology. Consequently, these developments have raised questions about the future of work. Debate on this issue has focused primarily on the risk of job loss attributable to automation, with less attention given to how automation may change the nature of workers’ jobs. This study employs a task-based approach that shifts the focus from job replacement to changes in the nature of Canadians’ work. This approach views occupations as a set of tasks, allowing researchers to assess the effects of automation in the context of changes in occupational tasks.

    Release date: 2021-01-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2020024
    Description:

    Recent improvements in robotics have rekindled ancient fears about the impact of robotics on humankind. Unfortunately, existing data seldom distinguishes robots from other types of automation, so research into their impact so far has been difficult. This article introduces research from a new Statistics Canada dataset, Robots!, on the impact of robots at the firm-level. The article examines the impact of robot investment on firm performance and employment at the enterprise level.

    Release date: 2020-11-02

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2020025
    Description:

    Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, advances in artificial intelligence and robotics raised concerns that automation might lead to relatively high unemployment rates in the coming years. This Economic Insights article examines the degree to which Canadians’ views about the impact of automation on net job creation in 1989 materialized three decades later.

    Release date: 2020-11-02

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020015
    Description:

    Recent advances in artificial intelligence and machine-learning technologies have fuelled fears of potential job losses among some workers. While the net impact of new technology on total jobs can be negative, positive or neutral, some workers may be more affected than others depending on how easily robots and algorithms can replace them, or how easily their skills complement the new technology. In the case of women and men, it is not clear who is likely to be most affected. This study estimates the risk of job transformation as a result of automation technology faced by women and men.

    Release date: 2020-09-24

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100033
    Description:

    Over the past few decades, computer technology has gradually changed workplaces, leading to a reduction of routine and manual job tasks, and an increase in non-routine, cognitive tasks. More recent developments in artificial intelligence and machine learning could be even more far-reaching, as they are designed to execute tasks that were traditionally considered non-automatable.

    Release date: 2020-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020011
    Description:

    The recent development of several artificial intelligence applications—such as driverless vehicles, robo-writers and computer-aided medical diagnostics—has led to concerns about the role of human workers in the future workforce. The COVID-19 pandemic has added to these concerns, as businesses may turn to new artificial intelligence technologies to perform work activities not traditionally regarded as automatable, such as social tasks. While previous studies have estimated the share of Canadian workers at high risk of automation-related job transformation, this study is the first to examine in great detail the automation risks faced by different groups of workers.

    Release date: 2020-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020003
    Description:

    From the early 2000s to the mid-2010s, the number of employees in manufacturing fell by roughly half a million in Canada. During that period, the percentage of Canadian men aged 21 to 55 employed mainly full time for at least 48 weeks in a given year fell by 5 percentage points, from 63.6% in 2000 to 58.6% in 2015. This study investigates whether the two trends are connected, i.e., whether the decline in manufacturing employment caused a decline in employment rates and wages among men.

    Release date: 2020-01-15

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201800154965
    Description:

    Information and communications technologies (ICT) play an important role in facilitating trade in services. The reduction in costs of ICT, technological advances and computerization of work have enabled services to increasingly be traded. Many services can now be instantaneously delivered online to businesses and consumers around the world.

    Release date: 2018-10-19
Reference (2)

Reference (2) ((2 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X20010016234
    Description:

    This paper discusses in detail issues dealing with the technical aspects of designing and conducting surveys. It is intended for an audience of survey methodologists.

    With the goal of obtaining a complete enumeration of the Canadian agricultural sector, the 2001 Census of Agriculture has been conducted using several collection methods. Challenges to the traditional drop-off and mail-back of paper questionnaires in a household-based enumeration have led to the adoption of supplemental methods using newer technologies to maintain the coverage and content of the census. Overall, this mixed-mode data collection process responds to the critical needs of the census programme at various points. This paper examines these data collection methods, several quality assessments, and the future challenges of obtaining a co-ordinated view of the methods' individual approaches to achieving data quality.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 61F0041M1998003
    Description:

    This on-line product describes the personalization of the long-form questionnaires of Canada's Annual Survey of Manufactures (ASM). Personalization was motivated by the desire to reduce respondent burden. Prior to personalization, long-form questionnaires were the same for all the establishments of a given 4-digit SIC industry. Each questionnaire contained a list comprising almost all the commodities likely to be used as inputs or produced as outputs by that industry. For the typical establishment, only a small subset of the commodities listed was applicable. Personalization involved tailoring those lists to each individual establishment, based on the previous reporting of that same establishment.

    After first defining terms and then providing some quantification of the need for personalization, the paper details a number of the prerequisites - an algorithm for commodity selection, a set of stand-alone commodity descriptions, and an automated questionnaire production system. The paper next details a number of the impacts of personalization - and does so in terms of response burden, loss of information, and automation. The paper concludes with a summary and some recommendations.

    Release date: 1998-04-03
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