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All (7)

All (7) ((7 results))

  • Stats in brief: 98-200-X2016006
    Description:

    This article in the Census in Brief series describes the family situations of children living in a lone-parent family, in a stepfamily or without their biological or adoptive parents. This document also highlights a few differences by the age of the children and by province and territory.

    Release date: 2017-08-02

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X201600114615
    Description:

    This chapter of the Report on the Demographic Situation in Canada shows recent trends related to international immigration in Canada.

    Release date: 2016-07-05

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201200211697
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Many parents take time off work to care for a child after birth or adoption. Whether or not parents take leave and the duration of that leave may be influenced by characteristics such as parental employment or child and maternal health factors.

    This article examines children's experiences of parent-reported leave after their birth or adoption. In addition, associations between leave and parent employment and child and maternal health factors are analyzed using data from the 2010 Survey of Young Canadians.

    Release date: 2012-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X201100111526
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article on international migration will provide an overview of the current demographic situation regarding immigration to Canada analyzed within a historical and international context, where possible. In addition, the category of admission of immigrants to Canada, primarily during the 2008 and 2009 period, with reference to preliminary 2010 data, as well as place of birth, provincial or territorial destination within Canada of immigrants, and a brief section on international adoption will be discussed.

    Release date: 2011-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X2008001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and the 2006 Census, this paper examines the topics of family, community, and child care of Aboriginal (off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit) children under six years of age. The paper explores issues such as family characteristics (size of families, age of parents, living with grandparents, persons involved in raising young Aboriginal children, Aboriginal children living in low-income economic families), feelings about community, cultural activities and child care arrangements. It is designed as a starting point to understanding the social and living conditions in which young Aboriginal children are learning and growing. The report is divided into three parts: First Nations children living off reserve, Métis children, and Inuit children.

    Release date: 2008-10-29

  • Table: 89-625-X
    Description:

    Cycle 20 of the General Social Survey (GSS) is the fourth cycle to collect detailed information on family life in Canada. The previous GSS cycles that collected family data were Cycles 5, 10 and 15. Topics include demographic characteristics such as age, sex, and marital status; family origin of parents; departure from the parental home; marriages of respondent; common-law unions of respondent; fertility and family intentions; birth and adoption; child custody; financial support agreement or arrangement for children and ex-spouse/partner; social networks; work-family balance and family functioning; work history and maternity and paternity leave. The GSS also gathered data on the respondent's main activity and other socio-demographic characteristics. The target population for Cycle 20 of the GSS is all persons 15 years of age and older in Canada, excluding residents of the Yukon, Northwest Territories, and Nunavut, and full-time residents of institutions.

    Release date: 2007-08-23

  • Articles and reports: 89-625-X2007002
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Over the past few decades, important social, economic and demographic changes have transformed the lives of Canadians: the decline and control of fertility, the legalization of divorce, an increase in common-law unions, and the entry of women in huge numbers into the labour market. In turn, these transformations have been examined in order to bring to light the extent and consequences of these changes on the family environment.

    Given these changes and trends, the 2006 General Social Survey addressed the question of how young Canadian families are negotiating key transitions on the early years of family life. The nature and timing of transitions such as the establishment and advancing of a career, moving out of the parental home, marriage or common-law union, accumulating assets such as a car or house, family formation and the dissolution of a common-law union or marriage, may be changing as the Canadian economic and social context changes. In addition, the survey explores the kinds of resources young families need and use as they move through these important family transitions.

    This report focuses on two of these key transitions, analyzing first the experiences of respondents who have had, or adopted, a child between 2001 and 2006, and secondly, examining the experiences of those who have had a separation or divorce during that same period. For both transitions, the analysis provides a brief description of those who experienced the change, then explores the services and resources that were used to help families as they move through these transitions.

    Release date: 2007-06-13
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Table: 89-625-X
    Description:

    Cycle 20 of the General Social Survey (GSS) is the fourth cycle to collect detailed information on family life in Canada. The previous GSS cycles that collected family data were Cycles 5, 10 and 15. Topics include demographic characteristics such as age, sex, and marital status; family origin of parents; departure from the parental home; marriages of respondent; common-law unions of respondent; fertility and family intentions; birth and adoption; child custody; financial support agreement or arrangement for children and ex-spouse/partner; social networks; work-family balance and family functioning; work history and maternity and paternity leave. The GSS also gathered data on the respondent's main activity and other socio-demographic characteristics. The target population for Cycle 20 of the GSS is all persons 15 years of age and older in Canada, excluding residents of the Yukon, Northwest Territories, and Nunavut, and full-time residents of institutions.

    Release date: 2007-08-23
Analysis (6)

Analysis (6) ((6 results))

  • Stats in brief: 98-200-X2016006
    Description:

    This article in the Census in Brief series describes the family situations of children living in a lone-parent family, in a stepfamily or without their biological or adoptive parents. This document also highlights a few differences by the age of the children and by province and territory.

    Release date: 2017-08-02

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X201600114615
    Description:

    This chapter of the Report on the Demographic Situation in Canada shows recent trends related to international immigration in Canada.

    Release date: 2016-07-05

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201200211697
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Many parents take time off work to care for a child after birth or adoption. Whether or not parents take leave and the duration of that leave may be influenced by characteristics such as parental employment or child and maternal health factors.

    This article examines children's experiences of parent-reported leave after their birth or adoption. In addition, associations between leave and parent employment and child and maternal health factors are analyzed using data from the 2010 Survey of Young Canadians.

    Release date: 2012-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X201100111526
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article on international migration will provide an overview of the current demographic situation regarding immigration to Canada analyzed within a historical and international context, where possible. In addition, the category of admission of immigrants to Canada, primarily during the 2008 and 2009 period, with reference to preliminary 2010 data, as well as place of birth, provincial or territorial destination within Canada of immigrants, and a brief section on international adoption will be discussed.

    Release date: 2011-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X2008001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and the 2006 Census, this paper examines the topics of family, community, and child care of Aboriginal (off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit) children under six years of age. The paper explores issues such as family characteristics (size of families, age of parents, living with grandparents, persons involved in raising young Aboriginal children, Aboriginal children living in low-income economic families), feelings about community, cultural activities and child care arrangements. It is designed as a starting point to understanding the social and living conditions in which young Aboriginal children are learning and growing. The report is divided into three parts: First Nations children living off reserve, Métis children, and Inuit children.

    Release date: 2008-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 89-625-X2007002
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Over the past few decades, important social, economic and demographic changes have transformed the lives of Canadians: the decline and control of fertility, the legalization of divorce, an increase in common-law unions, and the entry of women in huge numbers into the labour market. In turn, these transformations have been examined in order to bring to light the extent and consequences of these changes on the family environment.

    Given these changes and trends, the 2006 General Social Survey addressed the question of how young Canadian families are negotiating key transitions on the early years of family life. The nature and timing of transitions such as the establishment and advancing of a career, moving out of the parental home, marriage or common-law union, accumulating assets such as a car or house, family formation and the dissolution of a common-law union or marriage, may be changing as the Canadian economic and social context changes. In addition, the survey explores the kinds of resources young families need and use as they move through these important family transitions.

    This report focuses on two of these key transitions, analyzing first the experiences of respondents who have had, or adopted, a child between 2001 and 2006, and secondly, examining the experiences of those who have had a separation or divorce during that same period. For both transitions, the analysis provides a brief description of those who experienced the change, then explores the services and resources that were used to help families as they move through these transitions.

    Release date: 2007-06-13
Reference (0)

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