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  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211536
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Young adults with one or two parents who are university-educated are much more likely to have a degree themselves than those whose parents are less well-educated. This article determines whether intergenerational mobility in university education is increasing. Specifically, whether people whose parents did not complete university are themselves more likely to have finished university than nearly 25 years ago is examined, as is whether the gap between them and people whose parents completed university has narrowed over time.

    Release date: 2011-08-24

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111442
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article, First Nations, Métis and Inuit Women explores the diverse circumstances and experiences of Aboriginal women in Canada. Overall, it highlights their demographic characteristics, families, housing, language, employment, income, education, justice and health. Where possible, data on First Nations, Métis and Inuit women are compared with those of their male counterparts and with non-Aboriginal women.

    Release date: 2011-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000111123
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article uses the 2004 General Social Survey on criminal victimization to explore how men and women of the core working age population (25 to 54 years) living in Census Metropolitan Areas differ in the precautions taken to avoid victimization. The results indicate that though men and women do not differ substantially in the amount of crime they perceive around them - they do differ in the precautions taken to avoid victimization. This difference remains unchanged even when other factors like fear of crime, income, age, and victimization experiences are taken into account.

    Release date: 2010-03-08

  • 4. Matter of Fact Archived
    Journals and periodicals: 89-630-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Matter of Fact is an analytic series highlighting what the General Social Survey (GSS) has contributed to understanding Canadian society over the last 20 years.

    The 20 years of GSS data is an opportunity to look back over our years of data and ask: What have we learned about Canadian society over those 20 years?

    This series will include short, focused, single-theme analysis documents. Over the course of the series analysis will include topics on: How satisfied are Canadians with their life in general? What is the relationship between education, work and retirement? What motivates people to retire or to continue working? How do people prepare for retirement? How is the Internet changing the way Canadians live? How are Canadians using their time? What do Canadian families look like? How have they changed in recent years? How are Canadians engaged with their families, neighbours, communities and coworkers? Which Canadians are caring for others? What is the impact of care-giving on people's work, families, leisure time and health? What are the victimization rates for Canadians, and who is most at risk of victimization? How have housing trends changed over the past 20 years? And how have religious practices changed over the past 20 years?

    Release date: 2008-09-25

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2008013
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The purpose of this research paper was to examine whether the chances of experiencing fear of crime varied across Canadian urban neighbourhoods, and whether factors associated with individuals and their neighbourhoods explained this variation. In addition, the study aimed to understand how Canadians' perceptions of neighbourhood crime and disorder influenced their chances of experiencing fear. Analyses were based on data from the 2004 General Social Survey (GSS) on Victimization and the 2001 Census. Multilevel regression modelling techniques were employed in order to address the statistical complications that arise when individuals are clustered within larger units such as neighbourhoods. The results showed that while the characteristics and perceptions of individuals were most important in explaining differences in fear among urban Canadians; a statistically significant portion of the variation in fear was attributable to the neighbourhood environment.

    Release date: 2008-07-30
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  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211536
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Young adults with one or two parents who are university-educated are much more likely to have a degree themselves than those whose parents are less well-educated. This article determines whether intergenerational mobility in university education is increasing. Specifically, whether people whose parents did not complete university are themselves more likely to have finished university than nearly 25 years ago is examined, as is whether the gap between them and people whose parents completed university has narrowed over time.

    Release date: 2011-08-24

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111442
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article, First Nations, Métis and Inuit Women explores the diverse circumstances and experiences of Aboriginal women in Canada. Overall, it highlights their demographic characteristics, families, housing, language, employment, income, education, justice and health. Where possible, data on First Nations, Métis and Inuit women are compared with those of their male counterparts and with non-Aboriginal women.

    Release date: 2011-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000111123
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article uses the 2004 General Social Survey on criminal victimization to explore how men and women of the core working age population (25 to 54 years) living in Census Metropolitan Areas differ in the precautions taken to avoid victimization. The results indicate that though men and women do not differ substantially in the amount of crime they perceive around them - they do differ in the precautions taken to avoid victimization. This difference remains unchanged even when other factors like fear of crime, income, age, and victimization experiences are taken into account.

    Release date: 2010-03-08

  • 4. Matter of Fact Archived
    Journals and periodicals: 89-630-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Matter of Fact is an analytic series highlighting what the General Social Survey (GSS) has contributed to understanding Canadian society over the last 20 years.

    The 20 years of GSS data is an opportunity to look back over our years of data and ask: What have we learned about Canadian society over those 20 years?

    This series will include short, focused, single-theme analysis documents. Over the course of the series analysis will include topics on: How satisfied are Canadians with their life in general? What is the relationship between education, work and retirement? What motivates people to retire or to continue working? How do people prepare for retirement? How is the Internet changing the way Canadians live? How are Canadians using their time? What do Canadian families look like? How have they changed in recent years? How are Canadians engaged with their families, neighbours, communities and coworkers? Which Canadians are caring for others? What is the impact of care-giving on people's work, families, leisure time and health? What are the victimization rates for Canadians, and who is most at risk of victimization? How have housing trends changed over the past 20 years? And how have religious practices changed over the past 20 years?

    Release date: 2008-09-25

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2008013
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The purpose of this research paper was to examine whether the chances of experiencing fear of crime varied across Canadian urban neighbourhoods, and whether factors associated with individuals and their neighbourhoods explained this variation. In addition, the study aimed to understand how Canadians' perceptions of neighbourhood crime and disorder influenced their chances of experiencing fear. Analyses were based on data from the 2004 General Social Survey (GSS) on Victimization and the 2001 Census. Multilevel regression modelling techniques were employed in order to address the statistical complications that arise when individuals are clustered within larger units such as neighbourhoods. The results showed that while the characteristics and perceptions of individuals were most important in explaining differences in fear among urban Canadians; a statistically significant portion of the variation in fear was attributable to the neighbourhood environment.

    Release date: 2008-07-30
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