Keyword search

Filter results by

Search Help
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Type

2 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Year of publication

1 facets displayed. 1 facets selected.

Geography

1 facets displayed. 1 facets selected.
Sort Help
entries

Results

All (28)

All (28) (0 to 10 of 28 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2008311
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the variability of workers' earnings in Canada over the 1982-to-2000 period by a graphical descriptive approach using the Longitudinal Administrative Data base file. Following Gottschalk and Moffitt (1994), we decompose the total variance of workers' earnings into a 'permanent' or long-run component between workers and a 'transitory' or year-to-year earnings instability component over time for given workers. The decomposition is applied to a five-year moving window. Several results are found. First, the general rise in total earnings variance over the period reflects quite different patterns of change for its separate components. Long-run earnings inequality has generally increased over the period, while year-to-year earnings instability has pretty steadily decreased. Changes in the total earnings variability have been driven primarily by changes in long-run earnings inequality. Second, the patterns of change in the two variance components showed substantial differences between men and women. Since the early 1990s, long-run earnings inequality continued to rise for men, but it markedly decreased for women. Since the late 1980s, earnings instability fell quite steadily for women, but it showed a more cyclical pattern for men. Third, the patterns across ages of the two variance components are almost opposite. Long-run earnings inequality generally rises with age, so it is markedly highest among older-age workers. Earnings instability, in contrast, generally declines with age, so it is markedly highest among entry-age workers.

    Release date: 2008-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2007008
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In this bulletin, we document the rural-urban differences in population age structure in terms of: the share of the total population that is senior; the rate of aging of the population in terms of two measures: the growth in the share of the population that is senior and the growth in the number of seniors; the number of communities that are aging by each of these measures; and selected characteristics of the aging communities as compared to communities that are not aging.

    Release date: 2008-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2008016
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Internet's rapid and profound entry into our lives quite understandably makes people wonder how, both individually and collectively, we have been affected by it. When major shifts in technology use occur, utopian and dystopian views of their impact on society often abound, reflecting their disruptiveness and people's concerns. Given its complex uses, the Internet, both as a technology and as an environment, has had both beneficial and deleterious effects. Above all, though, it has had transformative effects.

    Are Canadians becoming more isolated, more reclusive and less integrated in their communities as they use the Internet? Or, are they becoming more participatory and more integrated in their communities? In addition, do these communities still resemble traditional communities, or are they becoming more like social networks than cohesive groups?

    To address these questions, this article organizes, analyzes and presents existing Canadian evidence. It uses survey results and research amassed by Statistics Canada and the Connected Lives project in Toronto to explore the role of the Internet in social engagement and the opportunities it represents for Canadians to be active citizens. It finds that Internet users are at least as socially engaged as non-users. They have large networks and frequent interactions with friends and family, although they tend to spend somewhat less in-person time and, of course, more time online. An appreciable number of Internet users are civically and politically engaged, using the Internet to find out about opportunities and make contact with others.

    Release date: 2008-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800210729
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article is adapted from the initial analytical report on the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS). The ACS was designed to provide a picture of the early development of Aboriginal children under age 6 and the social and living conditions in which they are learning and growing. The focus of this article is the family, community and traditional cultural activities of First Nations children living off reserve, Métis children, and Inuit children.

    Release date: 2008-11-26

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2007007
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This bulletin updates and summarizes information on the structure and trends for the rural population of Canada, using three major definitions of rural Canada: the "census rural" definition, the "rural and small town" definition and the OECD "predominantly rural region" definition. Each definition illustrates a specific aspect of rural Canada. This analysis is entirely based on data from the Census of Population from 1981 to 2006 (Statistics Canada, 2007).

    Release date: 2008-11-04

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800210689
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data from the 2007 General Social Survey, this article investigates new national level data on caregiving. It is well established that family and friends provide care to ailing seniors. Focusing on caregivers aged 45 and over, the article examines whether family and friend care differs by the type of health problem the senior has (be it physical or mental), or whether the care was provided to a senior living in a private household or care facility. We also look at who provides care to seniors, which tasks are provided and how often, how caregivers cope, and where they turn in order to seek support. Included is a profile of the seniors 65 years and over with a long-term health problem who were receiving care from these caregivers.

    Release date: 2008-10-21

  • 7. Matter of Fact Archived
    Journals and periodicals: 89-630-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Matter of Fact is an analytic series highlighting what the General Social Survey (GSS) has contributed to understanding Canadian society over the last 20 years.

    The 20 years of GSS data is an opportunity to look back over our years of data and ask: What have we learned about Canadian society over those 20 years?

    This series will include short, focused, single-theme analysis documents. Over the course of the series analysis will include topics on: How satisfied are Canadians with their life in general? What is the relationship between education, work and retirement? What motivates people to retire or to continue working? How do people prepare for retirement? How is the Internet changing the way Canadians live? How are Canadians using their time? What do Canadian families look like? How have they changed in recent years? How are Canadians engaged with their families, neighbours, communities and coworkers? Which Canadians are caring for others? What is the impact of care-giving on people's work, families, leisure time and health? What are the victimization rates for Canadians, and who is most at risk of victimization? How have housing trends changed over the past 20 years? And how have religious practices changed over the past 20 years?

    Release date: 2008-09-25

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X200800310679
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article presents rates of participation in organized extracurricular activities by Canadian children and youth aged 6 to 17 years, and examines how these rates vary by socio-demographic and socio-economic characteristics. The data are from cycle 4 of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (2000/2001).

    Release date: 2008-09-17

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2007006
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This bulletin presents baseline data on the pattern and size of rural commuting flows in 2001 and provides a better understanding of how rural communities are affected by both urban-bound commuters and rural-bound commuters. It also shows that Canada's Census Metropolitan Areas and Census Agglomerations (larger urban centres), which are delineated on the basis of commuting flows, essentially constitute self-contained labour markets.

    Release date: 2008-09-17

  • Articles and reports: 89-630-X200800110673
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Teenagers are not sitting in front of the television all day, but they are keeping busy at other activities! The General Social Survey (GSS) collected time use data in 1986, 1992, 1998 and 2005. Time-use data examines time use over a 24 hour period on a diary day. The analysis in this fact sheet looks at time use by participation rate (number of people reporting an activity) and by the number of minutes spent on an activity. The data show that teenagers aged 15 to 19 were spending less time in front of the television but were spending more time working at a paid job and using the Internet in 2005.

    Release date: 2008-09-11
Data (0)

Data (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Analysis (28)

Analysis (28) (0 to 10 of 28 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2008311
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the variability of workers' earnings in Canada over the 1982-to-2000 period by a graphical descriptive approach using the Longitudinal Administrative Data base file. Following Gottschalk and Moffitt (1994), we decompose the total variance of workers' earnings into a 'permanent' or long-run component between workers and a 'transitory' or year-to-year earnings instability component over time for given workers. The decomposition is applied to a five-year moving window. Several results are found. First, the general rise in total earnings variance over the period reflects quite different patterns of change for its separate components. Long-run earnings inequality has generally increased over the period, while year-to-year earnings instability has pretty steadily decreased. Changes in the total earnings variability have been driven primarily by changes in long-run earnings inequality. Second, the patterns of change in the two variance components showed substantial differences between men and women. Since the early 1990s, long-run earnings inequality continued to rise for men, but it markedly decreased for women. Since the late 1980s, earnings instability fell quite steadily for women, but it showed a more cyclical pattern for men. Third, the patterns across ages of the two variance components are almost opposite. Long-run earnings inequality generally rises with age, so it is markedly highest among older-age workers. Earnings instability, in contrast, generally declines with age, so it is markedly highest among entry-age workers.

    Release date: 2008-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2007008
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In this bulletin, we document the rural-urban differences in population age structure in terms of: the share of the total population that is senior; the rate of aging of the population in terms of two measures: the growth in the share of the population that is senior and the growth in the number of seniors; the number of communities that are aging by each of these measures; and selected characteristics of the aging communities as compared to communities that are not aging.

    Release date: 2008-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2008016
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Internet's rapid and profound entry into our lives quite understandably makes people wonder how, both individually and collectively, we have been affected by it. When major shifts in technology use occur, utopian and dystopian views of their impact on society often abound, reflecting their disruptiveness and people's concerns. Given its complex uses, the Internet, both as a technology and as an environment, has had both beneficial and deleterious effects. Above all, though, it has had transformative effects.

    Are Canadians becoming more isolated, more reclusive and less integrated in their communities as they use the Internet? Or, are they becoming more participatory and more integrated in their communities? In addition, do these communities still resemble traditional communities, or are they becoming more like social networks than cohesive groups?

    To address these questions, this article organizes, analyzes and presents existing Canadian evidence. It uses survey results and research amassed by Statistics Canada and the Connected Lives project in Toronto to explore the role of the Internet in social engagement and the opportunities it represents for Canadians to be active citizens. It finds that Internet users are at least as socially engaged as non-users. They have large networks and frequent interactions with friends and family, although they tend to spend somewhat less in-person time and, of course, more time online. An appreciable number of Internet users are civically and politically engaged, using the Internet to find out about opportunities and make contact with others.

    Release date: 2008-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800210729
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article is adapted from the initial analytical report on the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS). The ACS was designed to provide a picture of the early development of Aboriginal children under age 6 and the social and living conditions in which they are learning and growing. The focus of this article is the family, community and traditional cultural activities of First Nations children living off reserve, Métis children, and Inuit children.

    Release date: 2008-11-26

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2007007
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This bulletin updates and summarizes information on the structure and trends for the rural population of Canada, using three major definitions of rural Canada: the "census rural" definition, the "rural and small town" definition and the OECD "predominantly rural region" definition. Each definition illustrates a specific aspect of rural Canada. This analysis is entirely based on data from the Census of Population from 1981 to 2006 (Statistics Canada, 2007).

    Release date: 2008-11-04

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800210689
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data from the 2007 General Social Survey, this article investigates new national level data on caregiving. It is well established that family and friends provide care to ailing seniors. Focusing on caregivers aged 45 and over, the article examines whether family and friend care differs by the type of health problem the senior has (be it physical or mental), or whether the care was provided to a senior living in a private household or care facility. We also look at who provides care to seniors, which tasks are provided and how often, how caregivers cope, and where they turn in order to seek support. Included is a profile of the seniors 65 years and over with a long-term health problem who were receiving care from these caregivers.

    Release date: 2008-10-21

  • 7. Matter of Fact Archived
    Journals and periodicals: 89-630-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Matter of Fact is an analytic series highlighting what the General Social Survey (GSS) has contributed to understanding Canadian society over the last 20 years.

    The 20 years of GSS data is an opportunity to look back over our years of data and ask: What have we learned about Canadian society over those 20 years?

    This series will include short, focused, single-theme analysis documents. Over the course of the series analysis will include topics on: How satisfied are Canadians with their life in general? What is the relationship between education, work and retirement? What motivates people to retire or to continue working? How do people prepare for retirement? How is the Internet changing the way Canadians live? How are Canadians using their time? What do Canadian families look like? How have they changed in recent years? How are Canadians engaged with their families, neighbours, communities and coworkers? Which Canadians are caring for others? What is the impact of care-giving on people's work, families, leisure time and health? What are the victimization rates for Canadians, and who is most at risk of victimization? How have housing trends changed over the past 20 years? And how have religious practices changed over the past 20 years?

    Release date: 2008-09-25

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X200800310679
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article presents rates of participation in organized extracurricular activities by Canadian children and youth aged 6 to 17 years, and examines how these rates vary by socio-demographic and socio-economic characteristics. The data are from cycle 4 of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (2000/2001).

    Release date: 2008-09-17

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2007006
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This bulletin presents baseline data on the pattern and size of rural commuting flows in 2001 and provides a better understanding of how rural communities are affected by both urban-bound commuters and rural-bound commuters. It also shows that Canada's Census Metropolitan Areas and Census Agglomerations (larger urban centres), which are delineated on the basis of commuting flows, essentially constitute self-contained labour markets.

    Release date: 2008-09-17

  • Articles and reports: 89-630-X200800110673
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Teenagers are not sitting in front of the television all day, but they are keeping busy at other activities! The General Social Survey (GSS) collected time use data in 1986, 1992, 1998 and 2005. Time-use data examines time use over a 24 hour period on a diary day. The analysis in this fact sheet looks at time use by participation rate (number of people reporting an activity) and by the number of minutes spent on an activity. The data show that teenagers aged 15 to 19 were spending less time in front of the television but were spending more time working at a paid job and using the Internet in 2005.

    Release date: 2008-09-11
Reference (0)

Reference (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Date modified: