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  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X19990004852
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Fifteen years ago in this series, A. Romaniuc published a comprehensive study of how fertility in Canada had evolved over the century. It described the phenomenal increase of fertility in the postwar period, resulting in the baby boom. With the largest cohorts ever known in Canada, the baby boomers, by their numbers alone, will have left their mark on Canada's social, economic and political structure throughout their life cycle.

    Release date: 1999-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X19990004853
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    At the beginning of this century, a Canadian male could expect to live an average of 47 years and a Canadian female, 50 years. At that time, barely 38% of males and 44% of females reached the respectable age of 65 years. They could then expect to live for roughly another decade.

    Release date: 1999-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X19990004854
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    As the century draws to a close, there are many topics of interest involving Canada's aboriginal peoples: self-government, land claims, the environment, the criminal justice system, urbanization, the labour market, education, etc. However, one topic receives little attention but could have a major impact on how the others will develop: the demographic growth of aboriginal populations.

    Release date: 1999-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1999138
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In this paper, we assemble data from several household surveys to document how pension coverage of young and older workers has evolved in Canada between the mid-1980s and the mid-1990s. Our main findings are the following. First, both administrative data from the Pension Plans in Canada (PPIC) database and data from household surveys show an increase in RPP coverage for women. In contrast, while PPIC data show a decrease in coverage for men, household surveys indicate no downward trend for males. Second, sample aggregates hide interesting differences within the population. We find that the pension coverage of young workers (aged 25-34) has declined relative to older workers (aged 35-54). Young males have experienced a decline in coverage while RPP coverage has remained fairly stable for older men. In contrast, pension coverage has remained fairly constant for young women but has risen substantially for older women. Third, the decline in unionism and shifts towards industries with low-coverage explain most of the decrease in coverage observed among young men. Fourth, the growth in older women's coverage appears to be the result of their greater propensity to be employed in highly paid/highly covered occupations.

    Release date: 1999-12-22

  • Journals and periodicals: 88-518-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The food-processing industry benefits from a wide a range of new advanced technologies. Technological advances include computer-based information and control systems, as well as sophisticated processing and packaging methods that enhance product quality, improve food safety and reduce costs. Continuous quality improvement and benchmarking are examples of related business practices.

    This study examines the use of advanced technologies in the food-processing industry. It focuses not just on the incidence and intensity of use of these new technologies but also on the way technology relates to overall firm strategy. It also examines how technology use is affected by selected industry structural characteristics and how the adoption of technologies affects the performance of firms. It considers as well how the environment influences technological change. The nature and structure of the industry are shown to condition the competitive environment, the business strategies that are pursued, product characteristics and the role of technology.

    Firms make strategic choices in light of technological opportunities and the risks and opportunities provided by their competitive environments. They implement strategies through appropriate business practices and activities, including the development of core competencies in the areas of marketing, production and human resources, as well as technology. Firms that differ in size and nationality choose to pursue different technological strategies. This study focuses on how these differences are reflected in the different use of technology for large and small establishments, for foreign and domestic plants and for plants in different industries.

    Release date: 1999-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1999105
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper outlines the growth in advanced technology use that has taken place over the last decade in Canadian manufacturing establishments. It presents the percentage of plants that use any one of the advanced technologies studied and how this has changed between 1989 and 1998. It also investigates how growth rates in the 1990s have varied across different technologies in specific functional areas, such as design and engineering, fabrication, communications, and integration and control. In an attempt to discover how changes in technology use are related to certain plant characteristics, the paper then investigates whether the growth in technology use varies across plants that differ by size, nationality and industry. Multivariate analysis is used to investigate the joint effects of plant size, foreign ownership and industry on the incidence of technology adoption and how these effects have changed over the last decade.

    Release date: 1999-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990128306
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This Juristat examines how much is being spent to operate the justice system in Canada and how many people are working in the system. Trends in spending and personnel are discussed for policing, courts, legal aid, criminal prosecutions, and corrections. Data for the report come from several sources, including the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics' resource, expenditure and personnel surveys, Statistics Canada's Financial Management System, and Justice Canada. Depending on the source, the data cover the period up to 1996/97 or 1997/98.

    Release date: 1999-12-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990034785
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines the family circumstances of 8- to 11-year-old youngsters to assess the link between behaviour and certain family characteristics.

    Release date: 1999-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990034786
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article provides information about Internet usage by Canadian households at the end of the 20th century.

    Release date: 1999-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990034787
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article looks at those Canadians who moved either to provide care to someone with a long-term health problem or to be looked after by someone else.

    Release date: 1999-12-09
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Table: 13-215-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This annual publication presents detailed tabulations on income of two-spouse families. It highlights families where both spouses work for pay by exploring their income and related characteristics and comparing them with other two-spouse families where only one spouse, or neither spouse, receives earnings from employment.

    Release date: 1999-09-10
Analysis (179)

Analysis (179) (0 to 10 of 179 results)

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X19990004852
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Fifteen years ago in this series, A. Romaniuc published a comprehensive study of how fertility in Canada had evolved over the century. It described the phenomenal increase of fertility in the postwar period, resulting in the baby boom. With the largest cohorts ever known in Canada, the baby boomers, by their numbers alone, will have left their mark on Canada's social, economic and political structure throughout their life cycle.

    Release date: 1999-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X19990004853
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    At the beginning of this century, a Canadian male could expect to live an average of 47 years and a Canadian female, 50 years. At that time, barely 38% of males and 44% of females reached the respectable age of 65 years. They could then expect to live for roughly another decade.

    Release date: 1999-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X19990004854
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    As the century draws to a close, there are many topics of interest involving Canada's aboriginal peoples: self-government, land claims, the environment, the criminal justice system, urbanization, the labour market, education, etc. However, one topic receives little attention but could have a major impact on how the others will develop: the demographic growth of aboriginal populations.

    Release date: 1999-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1999138
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In this paper, we assemble data from several household surveys to document how pension coverage of young and older workers has evolved in Canada between the mid-1980s and the mid-1990s. Our main findings are the following. First, both administrative data from the Pension Plans in Canada (PPIC) database and data from household surveys show an increase in RPP coverage for women. In contrast, while PPIC data show a decrease in coverage for men, household surveys indicate no downward trend for males. Second, sample aggregates hide interesting differences within the population. We find that the pension coverage of young workers (aged 25-34) has declined relative to older workers (aged 35-54). Young males have experienced a decline in coverage while RPP coverage has remained fairly stable for older men. In contrast, pension coverage has remained fairly constant for young women but has risen substantially for older women. Third, the decline in unionism and shifts towards industries with low-coverage explain most of the decrease in coverage observed among young men. Fourth, the growth in older women's coverage appears to be the result of their greater propensity to be employed in highly paid/highly covered occupations.

    Release date: 1999-12-22

  • Journals and periodicals: 88-518-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The food-processing industry benefits from a wide a range of new advanced technologies. Technological advances include computer-based information and control systems, as well as sophisticated processing and packaging methods that enhance product quality, improve food safety and reduce costs. Continuous quality improvement and benchmarking are examples of related business practices.

    This study examines the use of advanced technologies in the food-processing industry. It focuses not just on the incidence and intensity of use of these new technologies but also on the way technology relates to overall firm strategy. It also examines how technology use is affected by selected industry structural characteristics and how the adoption of technologies affects the performance of firms. It considers as well how the environment influences technological change. The nature and structure of the industry are shown to condition the competitive environment, the business strategies that are pursued, product characteristics and the role of technology.

    Firms make strategic choices in light of technological opportunities and the risks and opportunities provided by their competitive environments. They implement strategies through appropriate business practices and activities, including the development of core competencies in the areas of marketing, production and human resources, as well as technology. Firms that differ in size and nationality choose to pursue different technological strategies. This study focuses on how these differences are reflected in the different use of technology for large and small establishments, for foreign and domestic plants and for plants in different industries.

    Release date: 1999-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1999105
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper outlines the growth in advanced technology use that has taken place over the last decade in Canadian manufacturing establishments. It presents the percentage of plants that use any one of the advanced technologies studied and how this has changed between 1989 and 1998. It also investigates how growth rates in the 1990s have varied across different technologies in specific functional areas, such as design and engineering, fabrication, communications, and integration and control. In an attempt to discover how changes in technology use are related to certain plant characteristics, the paper then investigates whether the growth in technology use varies across plants that differ by size, nationality and industry. Multivariate analysis is used to investigate the joint effects of plant size, foreign ownership and industry on the incidence of technology adoption and how these effects have changed over the last decade.

    Release date: 1999-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990128306
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This Juristat examines how much is being spent to operate the justice system in Canada and how many people are working in the system. Trends in spending and personnel are discussed for policing, courts, legal aid, criminal prosecutions, and corrections. Data for the report come from several sources, including the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics' resource, expenditure and personnel surveys, Statistics Canada's Financial Management System, and Justice Canada. Depending on the source, the data cover the period up to 1996/97 or 1997/98.

    Release date: 1999-12-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990034785
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines the family circumstances of 8- to 11-year-old youngsters to assess the link between behaviour and certain family characteristics.

    Release date: 1999-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990034786
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article provides information about Internet usage by Canadian households at the end of the 20th century.

    Release date: 1999-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990034787
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article looks at those Canadians who moved either to provide care to someone with a long-term health problem or to be looked after by someone else.

    Release date: 1999-12-09
Reference (2)

Reference (2) ((2 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 61F0019X19990025579
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Unified Enterprise Survey (UES) incorporates several annual business surveys into an integrated survey framework. It aims to ensure Statistics Canada receives consistent and integrated data from many types and sizes of businesses, with enough detail to produce accurate provincial statistics. This year, 17 industry surveys are included in the UES, as well as two cross-industry surveys of large enterprises.

    Release date: 1999-06-25

  • Geographic files and documentation: 92F0138M1993001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Geography Divisions of Statistics Canada and the U.S. Bureau of the Census have commenced a cooperative research program in order to foster an improved and expanded perspective on geographic areas and their relevance. One of the major objectives is to determine a common geographic area to form a geostatistical basis for cross-border research, analysis and mapping.

    This report, which represents the first stage of the research, provides a list of comparable pairs of Canadian and U.S. standard geographic areas based on current definitions. Statistics Canada and the U.S. Bureau of the Census have two basic types of standard geographic entities: legislative/administrative areas (called "legal" entities in the U.S.) and statistical areas.

    The preliminary pairing of geographic areas are based on face-value definitions only. The definitions are based on the June 4, 1991 Census of Population and Housing for Canada and the April 1, 1990 Census of Population and Housing for the U.S.A. The important aspect is the overall conceptual comparability, not the precise numerical thresholds used for delineating the areas.

    Data users should use this report as a general guide to compare the census geographic areas of Canada and the United States, and should be aware that differences in settlement patterns and population levels preclude a precise one-to-one relationship between conceptually similar areas. The geographic areas compared in this report provide a framework for further empirical research and analysis.

    Release date: 1999-03-05
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